Week #01; Wed, 1/03/18: Genesis 1-8

Week #1; Wed, 1/03/18: Genesis 1:1-8:22

NOTE: It appears these topics give “pause” for much deeper thought. Please boost where led to post a comment.

Genesis 1:3 and 1:14 related to “lights” on the 1st day and the 4th day (potentially duplicity of events or grandeurs of thought). LOOKS LIKE DIFFERENT LEVELS OF THE HEAVENS PERTAIN

Genesis 2:10 related to the river flowing out of Eden that divided into four (directional flow of water pertaining to today’s map). LOOKS LIKE A TRANSLATION CLARIFICATION MAY BE NEEDED ON THE FLOW OF WATER. I BELIEVE ALL FOUR RIVERS FLOW INTO THE PERSIAN GULF.

Genesis 3:1 related to Isaiah 14:14 related to “The Fall” (early arrival of Lucifer). LUCIFER APPEARS TO LURKING AROUND TO DISRUPT THE SETTING AS HE DID IN HEAVEN WHEN DEFEATED BY GABRIEL AND MICHAEL.

Genesis 4:7 related to Cain (Cain must “rule” over sin). STRIKES ME AS HOPELESS GIVEN LUCIFER IS ROAMING LOOSE FOR SOMEONE TO DEVOUR.

Genesis 6:1 related to the Nephilim and the sons of God (corruption on the earth and potential false gods leading to God’s sorrow for creating humans) IF READ AS FALSE GODS, THEN I CAN TRACK IT.

Genesis 7:2 related to “seven” pairs of all clean animals aboard the ark (for sacrifice) SEVEN PAIRS VERSUS A SINGLE PAIR WOULD APPEAR TO GIVE A SPECIAL PURPOSE TO THESE ANIMALS, PERHAPS FOR SACRIFICES ONCE LANDED

Week #02; Wed, 1/10/18: Genesis 9-17

Week #2; Wed, 1/10/18: Genesis 9:1-17:27

NOTE: It appears these topics give “pause” for much deeper thought. Please boost where led to post a comment.

Genesis 9:1 related to no restrictions on what to eat. RESTRICTIONS PROBABLY COME LATER.

Genesis 10:5 versus 11:1 on one or more languages used. PERHAPS ONLY THE PEOPLE OF BABEL HAD THEIR LANGUAGE CONFUSED AMONG THEM ONLY

Genesis 12:1 “Go.” leading to 15:18 on the boundaries of Israel. GOD’S INTENT APPEARS TO BE FIXED ON THESE LOCATIONS.

Genesis 16, 17, and 18 related to the two covenants with Abram pertaining to Ishmael and Isaac. IT APPEARS THE ORIGINAL DIVISIONS REMAIN TODAY

Week #03; Wed, 1/17/18: Genesis 18-24

Week #3; Wed, 1/17/18: Genesis 18:1-24:67

NOTE: These topics appear to give “pause” for much deeper thought. Please boost where led to post a comment.

Genesis 16, 17, and 18 related to the two covenants with Abram pertaining to Ishmael and Isaac. IT APPEARS THE ORIGINAL DIVISIONS REMAIN TODAY

Genesis 22 related to the sacrifice of Isaac (impact of obedience). THE FATHER OF FAITH COMES THROUGH

Genesis 24:7 related to the role of the angel pertaining to Isaac and Rebekah (impact of obedience). MESSENGERS HAVE MAJOR IMPACT ON DECISIONS LIKE THESE.

Week #04; Wed, 1/24/18: Genesis 25-30

Week #4; Wed, 1/24/18: Genesis 25:1-30-30:43

Genesis 25:23 related to Esau and Jacob and the two nations descending form Isaac and Rebekah. CONTENTION, DECEPTION, AND CHEATING IMPACTS OUTPUTS AND OUTCOMES IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF GOD’S GREAT OPERATION IN INTRODUCING HIS KINGDOM AMONG PEOPLE.

Genesis 26:3, 5 related to God’s “oath” to Abraham. GOD ATTRIBUTED ABRAHAM’S WILLINGNESS TO OBEY HIS VOICE AND KEEP HIS CHARGE, HIS COMMANDMENTS, HIS STATUTES, AND HIS LAWS AS THE BASIS FOR PROVIDING LANDS AND NATIONS.

Genesis 27:10 related to Isaac blessing Jacob. CONTENTION, DECEPTION, AND CHEATING CONTINUES TO IMPACT DEVELOPMENT OF GOD’S OPERATION.

Genesis 28:12 related to Jacob’s ladder. GOD PROMISES JACOB THE LAND ON WHICH HE LIES.

Genesis 29:25 related to Leah and Rachel. CONTENTION, DECEPTION, AND CHEATING CONTINUES TO IMPACT DEVELOPMENT OF GOD’S OPERATION.

Genesis 30:27 related to use of divination. CONTENTION, DECEPTION, AND CHEATING CONTINUES TO IMPACT DEVELOPMENT OF GOD’S OPERATION.

Week #05; Wed, 1/31/18: Genesis 31-36

Week #5; Wed. 1/31/18: Genesis 31:1-36:43

Genesis 31: 11 pertaining to the angel of God who directs Jacob to “return to the land of your kindred.” THE HANDS ON ACTIVITY OF GOD WHO DIRECTS MOVES AND HIS PEOPLE LIKE JACOB OBEY. ALSO, GOD’S ACTIVITY SHOWS UP IN DREAMS TO THE LIKES OF LABEN DIRECTING HIM TO DO NO GOOD OR BAD TO JACOB.

Genesis 32:1, 28 pertaining to the angels of God and Esau and Jacob’s encounter with God. JACOB WRESTLES WITH AND IS BLESSES BY GOD AND IS RENAMED ISRAEL.

Genesis 33:4 pertaining the meeting between Jacob and Esau. THEY BOTH WEPT AT BEING REUNITED.

Genesis 34:5, 15 pertaining to the defiling of Dinah, the daughter of Leah and Jacob. THE HIVITES SUFFERED SHAME AND DEATH FOR ABUSE OF DINAH.

Genesis 35:9, 23 pertaining to God’s reaffirmation of Jabob’s name as Israel. THE LAND GIVEN TO ABRAHAM WILL BE GIVEN TO ISRAEL AND THEIR OFFSPRING.

Genesis 36:1 pertaining to Esau’s dependents. THE SEPARATION OF JACOB AND ESAU IS DETERMINED BY INSUFFICIENT LAND TO SUPPORT HERDS OF BOTH.

Week #06; Wed, 2/07/18: Genesis 37-42

Week #6; Wed, 2/07/18: Genesis 37:1-42:38:

Genesis 37:7, 28, 36 pertaining to Joseph’s dreams, his journey to Egypt, and sale to Potiphar sets a stage for his dreams to come true as planned by God in order for the Hebrew people to survive the famine and drought coming to their homeland.

Genesis 38:1 related to Judah’s “turning aside” led to a “ladder” of problems in his legacy that brought shame and sin to Judah.

Genesis 39:2, 5, 23 indicates that the Lord blessed Joseph and the Egyptian’s house; but a lie resulted in him being cast into prison. However, Joseph gained favor in prison just like he did in Potiphar’s house because the Lord made him succeed. The Lord is still unfolding his plan through Joseph’s many difficulties.

Genesis 40:1-23, shows how Joseph interpreted two prisoners’ dreams; the chief cupbearer and the chief baker; however, Joseph was forgotten and remained in prison.

Genesis 41:1-56 indicates much later, Joseph’s reputation as an interpreter of dreams resulted in him being summoned to interpret Pharaoh’s dreams. When Joseph interpreted the Pharaoh’s dreams (Note: God gave Pharaoh two dreams to demonstrate that the dreams were from God and were confirmed and interpreted by Joseph); he was placed back in power to manage the upcoming famine and drought in the land of Egypt. At 33 years old, Joseph commanded all of Egypt and manage all the grain that would come to support all of the earth.

Genesis 42:1-38 pertains to Jacob learning that grain was for sale in Egypt and he sent his sons (without Benjamin) to buy some to make it available in the land of Canaan. But, Joseph recognized his brothers and sent them back to Canaan to bring back Benjamin while he held Simeon until they returned with Benjamin.

Week #07; Wed, 02/14/18: Genesis 43-50

Week #7; Wed, 02/14/18: Genesis 43:1-50:26

Genesis 43 reveals Benjamin returns to Egypt with his brothers to buy food with the approval of Israel. They took money that was returned to them and doubled it thinking what was returned was an oversight. Upon arrival, Joseph prepared dinner in his house for his brothers at noon. The brothers were fearful of Joseph and returned the money that was placed in their sacks when they left Egypt to bring back Benjamin. Joseph inquired of the health of his father.

Genesis 44 shows that Joseph, as a test, had his silver cup placed in the sack of Benjamin with his money for the grain that they bought. Joseph’s servants were instructed to chase after his brothers and locate the silver cup and accuse them of doing evil. When they overtook them, they required his brothers to reveal what was in their sacks and hold anyone with the cup accountable by becoming his servant. The cup was found in Benjamin’s sack. Judah pleads with Joseph to let Benjamin return to his father and for Judah to become Joseph’s servant instead of Benjamin. Judah reveals his pledge to his father regarding the safety of Benjamin and emphasizes the risk to his fathers health if Benjamin does not return to Canaan with his brothers.

Genesis 45 states that Joseph is overcome with emotion for his brothers and he made himself known to his brothers. He explained how God sent him to Egypt ahead of them to preserve life and to preserve a remnant on earth with many survivors. Joseph sent his brothers for his father Jacob to come to Egypt and dwell in the fertile land of Goshen. When Pharaoh learned this he was pleased and promised the best of all the land of Egypt for Jacob and his family. Israel decided to go and see Joseph in Egypt when he saw his sons at their return. He could not believe Joseph was still alive and in charge of all of Egypt and its resources.

Genesis 46 records how Israel offered sacrifices to God at Beersheba and God spoke to Israel in visions of the night saying, “Do not be afraid to go down to Egypt, for there I will make you into a great nation. I myself will go down with you to Egypt, and I will also bring you up again, and Joseph’s hand shall close your eyes.” All the persons of the house of Jacob who came into Egypt were seventy.

Genesis 47 describes Jacob’s settlement in Goshen from the land of Canaan. Joseph went in and told Pharaoh who told Joseph to settle your father and your brothers in the best of the land; in Goshen, the land of Rameses. Jacob was 130 years old when he and his family arrived in Egypt. The famine was very severe and the land languished. Joseph obtained for Pharaoh all of the money, livestock, and land from the Egyptians in exchange for food. The people became servants of Pharaoh. Only the land of the priests was not sold to Pharaoh and they lived on a fixed allowance. Jacob and his family lived in Egypt for 17 years before he died. He made Joseph promise not to bury him in Egypt, but with his fathers.

Genesis 48 reveals that Israel claimed Ephraim and Manasseh as his sons and blessed them to carry on his name and the name of his fathers Abraham and Isaac, that they may grow into a multitude in the midst of the earth.

Genesis 49 records that Jacob called all of his twelve sons together to tell them what shall happen to them in the days to come. Jacob dies and is buried in Canaan with Leah his wife in the field of Machpelah, to the east of Mamre.

Genesis 50 is scheduled for “Week 8” however, it should be covered with this reading as it is the close of Genesis. So, after Joseph buried his father Jacob, he returned to Egypt with his brothers. Joseph then comforted his brothers who were afraid that he would retaliate toward them because they did evil to him. But, Joseph wept when they spoke to them. He told them not to fear and explained that God’s purpose was fulfilled through what they did (Joseph’s dreams pertain). Joseph lived 110 years and died in Egypt where he was embalmed and buried. He told his sons, including Ephraim and Manasseh, to swear to carry up his bones from there to the land that God swore to Abraham, Isaac, and to Jacob; the land of Canaan.

Week #08; Wed, 2/21/18: Gen. 50-Ex. 6

Week #8; Wed, 2/21/18: Gen. 50:1-Ex. 6:30 (NOTE: Genesis 50 placed with week 7 readings above).

Exodus 1 pertaining to the new king of Egypt. It appears that the key to Israel going into bondage was the arrival of a new Pharaoh who did not know Joseph. This Pharaoh feared that the growth of the people of Israel would become too mighty for the Egyptians. The more they were oppressed, the more they multiplied.

Exodus 2 introduces Moses under the threat of Pharaoh to kill all of Israel’s male newborn. He was released in a basket into the Nile but the daughter of Pharaoh discovered him and recovered him and called for a nurse to take care of him. When he grew up he had to flee to Midian because he killed an Egyptian and Pharaoh wanted to kill him. NOTE THAT MIDIAN IS IN SAUDI ARABIA, NOT SINAI, AND THIS IS WHERE HE SAW THE BURNING BUSH. RETAIN THIS INFORMATION FOR PINPOINTING THE LOCATION WHERE MOSES LATER RECEIVED THE TEN COMMANDMENTS–MT. SINAI OR MT. HOREB, THE MOUNTAIN OF GOD.

Exodus 3 reveals the burning bush containing the angel of the Lord as it speaks to Moses; the voice of God was heard saying, “Take your sandals off your feet, for the place on which you are standing is HOLY GROUND.” Moses is appointed by God to lead Israel up out of the land of Egypt to a land flowing with milk and honey, to the place of the Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Hivites and Jebusites. Moses reluctantly goes back to Egypt since the Pharaoh died that threatened his life. NOTE THAT GOD TELLS MOSES THAT WHEN HE HAS BROUGHT THE PEOPLE OUT OF EGYPT, HE WILL SERVE GOD ON THIS MOUNTAIN–MT. HOREB IN SAUDI ARABIA.

Exodus 4 describes the powerful signs God gave to Moses to use to convince Pharaoh to let His people go.

Exodus 5 reveals how Pharaoh only became harsher toward the people and made them make bricks without straw; they had to find their own straw and make the same number of bricks as before. Pharaoh would not let the people go, even to sacrifice in the wilderness.

Exodus 6 confirms that God will bring the people out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, deliver them from slavery, and deliver them to the land of milk and honey. But the people did not listen because of their broken spirit and harsh slavery. God charged Moses and Aaron to bring the people of Israel out of the land of Egypt.

Week #09; Wed, 2/28/18: Exodus 7-12

Week #9; Wed, 2/28/18: Exodus 7:1-12:51

Exodus 7 contains multiple events by Moses and Aaron showing how God hardened Pharaoh’s heart with His many miracles and plagues (i.e., Nile turned into blood) so that in the end the Egyptians shall know that “I am the LORD.”

Exodus 8 continues to reveal plagues placed on the Egyptians by God (i.e., frogs, gnats, flies). Each time a respite from the plagues took place, Pharaoh hardened his heart and would not let the Hebrew people go into the desert to sacrifice to the LORD. The Hebrew people were protected from the plagues in the land of Goshen where they lived. Moses insisted on three days travel by the Hebrews to make sacrifice to the LORD. Pharaoh denied the request. More plagues came to the Egyptians.

Exodus 9 reveals how the plagues on all Egyptian livestock took place but not the Hebrews livestock. Boils on man and beast came next even on Pharaoh’s magicians. Hail was sent by the LORD to destroy everything that was in the field in all the land of Egypt; only in Goshen, where the people of Israel were, was there no hail. Pharaoh confessed, “This time I have sinned; the LORD is in the right, and I and my people are in the wrong.” But, he still did not let the people go.

Exodus 10 reveals by then Egypt is in ruins; but, Pharaoh would not let all of the people go to serve the LORD; the young had to stay. So locusts descended on the land with an east wind and devoured all that remained in the land. But, Pharaoh would still not let the people go. Pharaoh threatened Moses with death,never to see his face again. Moses said, “As you say!”

Exodus 11 contains Moses’ threat to Pharaoh and preparations for the final plague–the Passover and the death of the firstborn in Egypt. The blood of an unblemished lamb (Passover lamb) shall be placed on the lintel and the two doorposts of each house of the people of Israel.

Exodus 12 reveals that at midnight, the LORD executed judgment throughout the land of Egypt striking down all the firstborn in the land of Egypt. Passover is still a memorial to be celebrated with a feast (Feast of Unleavened Bread) to the LORD. Even the firstborn of Pharaoh to all of the people of Egypt lost their firstborn that night, but the Hebrew people who followed God’s commands given to Moses and Aaron were spared. Pharaoh sent the people of Israel out of Egypt, thus beginning the urgent Exodus including the plundering of the Egyptians. 430 years were spent in Egypt and their numbers rose to 600,000 men, besides women and children, plus a multitude with all of their livestock.

Week #10; Wed, 3/07/18: Ex. 13-19

Week #10; Wed, 3/07/18: Exodus 13:1-19:25

13. The consecration of all the firstborn marks the end of slavery and the exit from Egypt and was declared by the Lord as a day of celebration to keep each year in the same month (Abib/Nissan/April). Unleavened bread is to be eaten for seven days to commemorate the Lord bringing the Hebrew people out of Egypt. Moses took the bones of Joseph with him to bury them. It is noteworthy that the Lord led them with pillars (2) of cloud by day and fire by night to enable them to travel both day and night.

14. These two clouds protected the Hebrew people from Pharaoh, especially at the crossing of the Red Sea. Moses told the people of Israel “the Lord will fight for you, and you have only to be silent” to prove to the Egyptians that the Lord is God and get glory over Pharaoh and al his host, his chariots, and his horsemen.
CRITICAL TACTICAL/MIRACULUS MANEUVERS:
1) “The angel of God who was going before the host of Israel moved and went behind them, and the pillar of cloud moved from before them and stood behind them, coming between the host of Egypt and the host of Israel.”
2) Moses stretched out his hand over the sea, and the Lord drove the sea back by a strong east wind until the waters divided.
3) The people of Israel went into the midst of the sea on dry ground between the walls of water.
4) The Egyptians until then were held back by the two clouds but later followed after them.
5) Moses stretched out his hand over the sea and the water covered the Egyptians and they all drowned.
The Lord saved Israel and the people feared the Lord and believed in the Lord and in his servant Moses.

15. The Lord provided fresh water from bitter water through a miracle by Moses throwing a log into the water. The people were supplied with with good water to drink in the wilderness.

16. The people were also provided with bread (manna) from heaven in the morning and quail at night to eat. They ate manna until they came to the border of the land of Canaan.

17. At Rephidim, again no water was available to drink. The Lord instructed Moses to strike the rock at Horeb (APPARENTLY AT MT. HOREB WHICH IN IN ARABIA). Water gushed out of the rock for the people to drink at Rephidim; the site of a battle with Amalek who was defeated. During the battle Aaron and Hur held up Moses hands until Joshua defeated Amalek by the sword. NOTEWORTHY is that this battle took place AFTER the crossing of the Red Sea.

18. Next, Jethro (Moses father-in-law) came to Moses in the wilderness where he was encamped at the mountain of God (Horeb). POINT: The people of Israel were beyond the Red Sea crossing beside the Mountain of God in Arabia as Paul alludes to in Galatians 4:25. God instructs Moses to bring the people up near the foot of the mountain and He came down on Mount Sinai, to the top of the mountain. He called Moses to the top of the mountain, and Moses went up. The Lord also sent Moses back to get Aaron.

QUESTION: IS MT. SINAI IN ARABIA OR EGYPT? Chapter 20 may shed more light on this question next week.

Week #11; Wed. 3/14/18: Ex. 20-26

Week #11; Wed. 3/14/18: Ex. 20:1-26:37

NOTE:

The account of the Red Sea crossing at: http://www.biblebelievers.org.au/bb971126.htm appears support God giving of the Ten Commandments in Arabia at Mt. Jabel El Laws, the mountain of God beyond the Gulf of Acaba in Midian. Archeological presentations appear to also give some support to such a location. My own reading renders a time-line in Scripture that lends credibility to Arabia, as does Paul in Galatians 4:22-26. As we read further, I’ll be looking for other geographical and timeline indicators as to the path the Hebrews took through the wilderness. Please share any you find in your reading.

Chapters:
20. The Ten Commandments are given by God. Note the the fifth commandment on honoring father and mother is the only commandment with a promise (vs. 12).

21. The rules of slavery give strict guidance to the owners. Note how family members are sold into slavery. Rules of conflict have strict penalties too (i.e., eye for an eye, etc.) and other restitution.

22. Other social injustices are heard by the the Lord adjudicates His wrath on evildoers. Note how the firstborn are to be given to God; the Sabbath and feasts are to be observed in season. God sent His angel to guard the people and bring them to the place that He appointed, Canaan.

23. Hornets will drive out the enemies of the people. He set the boundaries for His people (v. 31). He cautioned against serving the Gods of their enemies.

24. Moses came up to the Lord with Aaron, Nadab, Abihu, and 70 of the elders of Israel to worship the Lord from afar. Moses alone was allowed to come near to the Lord. God gave him the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandments He wrote for instruction. The people promised they would do what the Lord commanded and be obedient. Moses was on the mountain for forty days and forty nights.

25. The Lord gave Moses the exact instructions for the Sanctuary using the gold, silver and bronze, plus many other things they received from the Egyptians. The Lord instructed Moses to build an ark to hold the testimony to be put into it. It will have a mercy seat and two cherubim of gold. This is where God spoke about meeting with Moses from the mercy seat to give him commandments for the people. Instructions were also given for the table for bread and the golden lampstand of pure gold.

26. The details for the tabernacle were also extensive requiring skillful workers and fine materials including a covering of tanned ram’s skins and goatskins on top. The Most Holy Place is to the location for the mercy seat and the ark of the testimony. Each part of the tabernacle had a directional significance. Note that no provisions were made for a tabernacle prior to the crossing of the Red Sea.

If you are reading in your personal Bible in lieu of an electronic means, please feel free to e-mail me your thoughts that you would like to share with others in our blog.

Week #12; Wed, 3/21/18: Ex. 27-32

Week #12; Wed, 3/21/18: Ex. 27:1-32:35

NOTE:

A. D. Archaeology Discovered with Kevin Fisher on the Crossing of the Red Sea is at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8y-uiccIiSY&index=2&t=0s&list=PL6NNBo_y_fjMk_bo9u17_2D5BNehXl6m6
This documentary demonstrates authenticity of Scripture found here in Exodus as well as anything I have ever seen. The robotic submarine tells its own story. Looks like amendments to maps in our Bibles could be needed.

CHAPTERS:

Exodus 27—I’m impressed by the exact terms used to describe the Bronze Altar, the court of the Tabernacle, even to the directional specifications and the use of the Oil for the Lamp.

Exodus 28—Likewise the garments for the priests have plentiful detail. The breastpiece with the twelve stones is significant far beyond Exodus in Scripture, even to the end. Much emphasis is on the setting of the Holy Place for worship.

Exodus 29—The priest’s consecration involved significant detail as well. Ordination of Aaron and his sons is spelled out clearly to include sacrificial offerings that produced a pleasing aroma to the Lord when burned. Verse 45 and 46 makes it clear why such preparations for the Temple were made. Note the use of “I Am.”

Exodus 30—God speaks of meeting with the people of Israel at the golden altar of incense. It is most holy to the Lord. The census tax of half a shekel for everyone from twenty years old not only supports the service of the tent of meeting and prevent plagues, but the census also documents the number of the people. The anointing oil and incense ingredients have specific amounts to blend together and may not be used for any other purpose. These details indicate that when the Lord speaks to His people, He demands accuracy in carrying out His instructions. We may want to take note how we line up our tent pegs too.

Exodus 31—Beauty of the works is attributed to those like Oholiab and Bezalel who were filled with the Spirit of God, with ability and intelligence, with knowledge and all craftsmanship to devise artistic designs for the gold, silver, bronze, stones, cloth, and wood. In reference to the Sabbath, NO WORK makes it clear that keeping the Sabbath is above all even to death of the person who does not obey. It is a sign forever between God and the people of Israel (and us). The first of the two tablets written by the finger of God were given to Moses on Mt. Sinai.

Exodus 32—It is amazing how fast the people of Israel gave up on Moses when he went up on Mt. Sinai and stayed for 40 days. They made for themselves a golden calf idol to worship and make sacrifice. The Lord wanted to consume them with fire, but Moses implored the Lord in a convincing manner not to do so using the promises He made to Abraham, Isaac, and Israel. Returning to the camp and seeing the calf and the dancing, Moses destroyed the tablets and commanded the Levites to destroy the men of the people. about three thousand men fell that day. Many more died later by a plague from the Lord because they made the calf to worship. Key to their sins was being “blotted out of His Book” which is still part of what people today face pertaining to blasphemy of the Spirit of God. God sent His angel to guide the people to a place where He instructed Moses.

Week #13; Wed, 3/28/18: Ex. 33-38

Week #13; Wed, 3/28/18: Ex. 33:1-38:31

CHAPTERS:
33. In departing Mt. Horeb, God sent an angel before the children of Israel to guide them to the promised land. He required them to strip themselves of their ornaments. The Tent of Meeting was guarded by the pillar of cloud while God spoke to Moses face to face. The people would worship at the front door of their tent while Moses was in the tent. Moses apparently looked at the image of God; however, when he asked the Lord to actually see his face, God said that man could not see His face and live. So, God hid Moses in the “cleft of the rock” until He passed by allowing Moses to only see his back. His face was not seen.

34. Per God’s command, two new tablets were cut by Moses to replace the two that he destroyed. He went up on the mountain where the Lord descended in a cloud and Moses worshiped Him. God promised to drive out the inhabitants of the land where they were going and He commanded them not to worship the gods of those inhabitants and to tear down their altars and break their pillars of worship. God commanded them to observe the Feast of Unleavened Bread and all the firstborn are to be redeemed. Details were given for the Feast of Weeks for the first fruits of the wheat harvest, the Feast of Ingathering and the Feast of the Passover. The Sabbath day is designated a day of rest. The Ten Commandments were re-written on the second set of stones. When Moses came down from the mountain with the two new stones, his skin shown brightly and he had to put a veil over his face.

35. Moses assembled all the congregation of the people of Israel and said to them six days work shall be done, but on the seventh day you shall have a Sabbath of solemn rest, holy to the Lord. The penalty for failing to observe the Sabbath was death. Detailed descriptions for contributions to the Lord for the building of the Tabernacle and the making of the holy garments were also provided and skilled craftsman were assigned to do the work. The construction of the Tabernacle involved detailed instructions including symmetry and directional components.

36. The contributions for the sanctuary were stopped once there was sufficient material to do the work.

37. The Ark of the Covenant and Mercy Seat were also made with the same kind of detailed instructions as the Tabernacle. The two Cherubim, the Table, the Lampstand, and the Altar of Incense, were also described by the Lord in great detail for the craftsmen to follow.

38. The Altar of Burnt Offering, the Bronze Basin, and the Court were constructed next in the same detail as previous items. Moses directed all the Lord commanded. At the time there were 603,550 men from twenty years old and upward.

Week #14; Wed, 4/04/18: Ex. 39-Lev. 5

Week #14; Wed, 4/04/18: Ex. 39:1-Lev. 5:19

I recommend following your read of these seven chapters that you view the video below for more current archaeology discoveries that pertain to the furnishings of the tabernacle. I promise it will not be Indiana Jones.

CHAPTERS:
Exodus 39. Much detail is also followed in making the priestly garments for ministering in the Holy Place. Aaron’s holy garments were of gold, blue, purple, and scarlet yarns and fine linen. The square breastpiece was assembled in a like manner with twelve stones embedded in gold settings; one for each tribe. All instructions were delivered to Moses by the Lord.

Exodus 40. The erection of the Tabernacle is thoroughly described in this chapter with attention to detail for directional alignment of the walls and location of the furnishings after they were anointed for worship so it will become holy. Moses erected the tabernacle. Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of the Lord filled the tabernacle. Whenever the cloud was taken up from over the tabernacle, the people of Israel would set out. The tabernacle was within the sight of all the people throughout all their journeys.

Leviticus 1. Many laws pertaining to offerings, particularly on the quality, for making atonement before the Lord were mandated. No blemish could be on any offering to the Lord. The burnt offerings made a pleasing aroma to the Lord. Note that the blood was sprinkled on the altar.

Leviticus 2. Grain offerings were to be of finest unleavened flour, oil, and frankincense. Bread had to be seasoned with salt.

Leviticus 3. Peace offerings to the Lord involved similar details in the laws pertaining to how they would be performed.

Leviticus 4. Sin offerings were governed by strict detailed laws as well. Both intentional and unintentional sins had specific offerings by the one who perpetrates the sin on another. Blood is to be applied to the altar if a burnt offering.

Leviticus 5. Further details are to be used for offerings for other matters related to committing sins and making atonement.

NOTE: The topic of blood on the altar arises in a recent video I viewed on YouTube at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B8TRoQk6WUE&list=PL6NNBo_y_fjMk_bo9u17_2D5BNehXl6m6&index=3 This video is narrated by Kevin Fisher with Bible scriptures and internal videos that pertain to the altar today. There are four video in the series, some I have previously referenced on crossing the Red Sea and Noah’s Ark. The last one that I will mention later is on Sodom and Gomorrah.

Week #15; Wed, 4/11/18: Lev. 6–11

Week #15; Wed, Apr 11: Lev. 6:1–11:47

Leviticus gives us the consecration of the priesthood; laws concerning sacrifices (usually burnt offerings); conditions for acceptance by God (faith and obedience); forgiveness of sin; schedule of feasts; clean and unclean animals; purification after birth; diseases; consequences of failure to comply; unlawful relationships; punishment for blasphemy; year of Jubilee; the poor; and the Holiness of the Lord.

CHAPTERS SIX THROUGH ELEVEN:
Leviticus 6. Deceiving or stealing from a neighbor required restoration in full and an additional one fifth when guilt was first realized. This guilt and sin offerings included giving the priest an offering of an animal without blemish to make atonement before the Lord. The priests were given detailed instructions on presenting the burnt offering even regarding clothing. Notice that the fire must burn continually. The grain offering included detailed instructions as well. The priests were prohibited from eating fat or blood.

Leviticus 7. Blood was to be thrown against the sides of the altar. Peace offerings, ordination offerings, fellowship offerings, and freewill offerings included details that were equally and rigidly observed, particularly on what could be eaten and what had to be disposed by fire. Failure to follow all instructions resulted in a person being cut off from his people. The offerings were to be perpetual throughout their generations. The priests were to have their share. The Lord commanded Moses on Mount Sinai for the people to bring offerings to the Lord in the wilderness.

Leviticus 8. The public ordination of Aaron and his son’s to the priests office was done exactly according to God’s instructions. The people were assembled at the entrance of the tent of meeting as the Lord commanded Moses. The importance of washing with water is significant in most all worship. The wave offering was for Moses before the Lord. Seven days were required for ordination. If the ordained did not perform their priestly duties, they were put to death*. They all complied.

Leviticus 9. On the eighth day Aaron presented his sin offering; his sons presented the blood of the bull and ram for throwing upon the altar. The flesh and the skin was burned up outside the camp. The sin, grain, and peace offerings were also performed in the sight of the people. The Lord consumed the sacrifices with fire; the glory of the Lord appeared to all the people. They shouted and fell on their faces.

Leviticus 10. Nadab and Abihu, sons of Aaron, offered unauthorized fire before the Lord. Fire came out from before the Lord and consumed them, killing them*. They were carried out of the camp. The Lord told Aaron, “Drink no wine or strong drink, you or your sons, when you go into the tent of meeting, lest you die. This was to distinguish between the holy and the common and the unclean and the clean. They were charged with teaching the people all the statutes that the Lord spoke to them by Moses.

Leviticus 11. Here is where the flesh of some animals and some of fish, insects, and birds are declared clean and unclean. Other restrictions on what is clean and unclean for consumption is also declared. Best for last: “For I am the Lord your God. Consecrate yourselves therefore, and be holy, for I am holy.” . . . “For I am the Lord who brought you up out of the land of Egypt to be your God. You shall therefore be holy, for I am holy.”

Week #16; Wed, 4/18/18: Lev. 12–16

Week #16; Wed, Apr 18: Lev. 12:1–16:34

LEVITICUS, CHAPTERS TWELVE THROUGH SIXTEEN:

12. Purification procedures were specific for protecting anything holy from contamination. A sacrificial offering was required at the end of the period of uncleanness for atonement depending on the ability of the person to pay the price for the offering (i.e., lamb, pigeon, turtledove).
13. Uncleanness also extended to all with a sore, eruption, or blemish which required a detailed examination by a priest. It appears many such skin conditions today would qualify for uncleanness resulting in having to conform with those having leprosy. Search on leprosy colonies and discover that these facilities dot the globe even now. Notice again the role of water in the process of returning to cleanliness. Even burns, spots, and garments were included in the evaluation process.
14. In addition to water, blood and oil were also used as an agent for cleansing one who has a leprous disease. Offerings by the individual were made (based on his/her ability to pay) as atonement. Special provisions were made for houses that were infected with a leprous disease, even to the extent of demolition.
15. Similar provisions were required for anyone with a discharge or emission.
16. A Day of Atonement was made for the people of Israel once a year because of all their sins. Note how Aaron, the priest, could not come at any time into the Holy Place inside the veil, before the mercy seat that is on the ark, so that he may not die. Aaron could only come when he was properly attired with the Holy Garments and with the proper offerings (i.e., bull, goat, ram). Notice how lots were cast to determine which of two goats would be sacrificed and which would be set free into the wilderness. Sweet incense played a role in worship too. Blood was applied to the altar, on the horns all around. The live goat that was released into the wilderness is a likely origin of the term “scapegoat.” Importantly, strict observance of the Sabbath as a day of solemn rest was required.

Week #17; Wed, 4/25/18: Lev. 17-23

Week #17; Wed., 4/25/18: Lev. 17-23

CHAPTERS: LEVITICUS 17 THROUGH 23

CHAPTER 17—Goat demons are to be excluded from worship with sacrifices; the punishment was being “cut off.” Eating blood resulted in the same punishment. Washing continues to be important for observation and adherence.

CHAPTER 18—Many laws and punishments extended to improper/forbidden sexual relations that had their own levels of consequence. The children of Israel should keep from the practices of Egypt and Canaan. God’s rules are the only rules in which to walk.

CHAPTER 19–God wants us to be holy as He is holy. A very high level of obedience for keeping the Sabbaths holy is demanded. No idols are permitted. Rules for a sacrifice contained strict and detailed steps to follow. The provisions for the poor and the sojourner were stated as to enable love for neighbor as yourself; not gleaning a field to the edge, stripping a vineyard bare–leave some for the less fortunate. No stealing, dealing falsely, lying, swearing are included here and note their relation to the Ten Commandments. Also, you shall love your neighbor as yourself as reiterated by Jesus. Strict agricultural practices also came under God’s statutes. It makes one wonder about today’s GMO practices. No omens or telling fortunes (mediums or necromancers) either. NO TATOOS as well. And just weights and measures were required (smile when you see the state seal on the gas pump and scales).

CHAPTER 20—Child sacrifices to Molech resulted in punishment by death (fast forward to today). Cursing father or mother and sexual immorality also resulted in the same punishment. Note how “the land” itself is enabled to play a role in punishment (vs. 22).

CHAPTER 21—Disfiguring the body was forbidden (fast forward here also). Limitations were placed on a blemished person.

CHAPTER 22—Limitations were placed on anyone unclean (i.e., sons of Aaron) persons (bathing in water appears here again). Acceptable offerings are specified which included being non-blemished for bulls, or the sheep or the goats; they must be perfect.

CHAPTER 23—God’s appointed feast are specified. The Sabbath dictates NO WORK. The Passover was set for the first month, on the fourteenth day of the month at twilight with the fifteenth day of the same month for the Feast of Unleavened Bread. Firstfruits, Weeks, Trumpets, Atonement, and Booths have specific dates and rules that apply to these feasts too. These feasts included observance on a day of rest with no work being performed.

Week #18; Wed, 5/02/18: Lev. 24–Num. 1

Week #18; Wed, May 02: Lev. 24:1–Num. 1:54

CHAPTER 24–From evening to morning the lamp stand of pure gold will be kept burning with pure oil from beaten olives before the Lord. Bread in two piles of six loafs are to be set on the table of pure gold before the Lord for Aaron and his sons. Whoever blasphemes the Name shall be stoned to death. An eye for an eye, tooth for a tooth, applied to the Israelite as well as a sojourner.

CHAPTER 25–The land is to be rested in the seventh year (the Sabbath Year). The Year of Jubilee was observed every 50th year where liberty was proclaimed throughout the land to all its inhabitants where property was returned to each. The poor were provided support as though he were a stranger and a sojourner and taken in to live not as a slave but a hired servant until the year of jubilee.

CHAPTER 26–A promise of blessing is due when the Lord’s statutes and commandments are observed and done, rains will be provided in their season, the land shall yield its increase, and the trees of the field shall yield their fruit. Enemies will fall and wild animals will not molest and the Lord will live among His people. But failure to obey and observe will result in a wide array of punishment to include being scattered among the nations making the cities desolate. But if they turn and obey His statutes, the Lord will keep His covenants that He made to their ancestors on Mount Sinai.

CHAPTER 27–Vows had their own set of laws which included the valuation of persons (Over 60? Note that your value drops). Things devoted to the Lord cannot be sold.

NUMBERS 1–The census of Israel’s warriors results in totals for each of the 12 tribes that exceed 603,550 overall.

Week #19; Wed, 5/09/18: Num. 2–6

Week #19; Wed, May 09: Num. 2:1–6:27

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

CHAPTER 2–The layout of the camp is given in detail with all companies facing the tent of meeting in strict order by compass direction with three companies on each side. It appears that the order of the camp facilitated moving into march formation when it became time to move (Judah, Ruben, Ephraim, and Dan with the Levites in the midst of the camps of companies and in the order of march). 603,550 fighting men were in the camp; the Levites were not included in the count.

CHAPTER 3–The sons of Aaron included Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar. the ordained priests. Nadab and Abihu died before the Lord when they offered unauthorized fire before the Lord. The priestly duties of Eleazar and Ithamar were extensive including ministering at the tabernacle and guarding the camp. The Lord declared that the Levites are His along with all the firstborn. The Levites numbered 22,000 males from a month old and upward; the firstborn numbered 22,273.

CHAPTER 4–The sons of Levi were Gershon, Kohath, Merari. Touching holy things of the tabernacle was sure death for those not authorized to handle them. Duties were assigned to specific clans for specific furnishing and materials. With these specific assignments, the movement of the tent of meeting and tabernacle could occur promptly as needed as the Lord commanded Moses.

CHAPTER 5–Provisions were made for unclean people with a leprous disease or discharge, including those becoming unclean through contact with the dead. Both male and female were put outside the camp so as to not defile the camp. Sins must be confessed and full restitution was required plus one fifth for breaking faith with the Lord. A test for adultery with the “water of bitterness and a curse” was performed by the priest when suspected. A man would be free from iniquity; however, a woman was not.

CHAPTER 6–Nazirites who vowed to separate themselves to the Lord also separated themselves from wine and strong drink; nothing from the grapevine, not even the seeds or the skin. Also, he shall let the hair on the head grow long. He is holy to the Lord. If he becomes defiled, a sin offering, burnt offering, and a guilt offering is required. At his consecration additional offerings are made at the tent of meeting and his head is shaved. Note the special blessing on Aaron that is familiar to many of us today.

NOTE: Here is a YouTube link from A.D. – Archaeology Discovered with Kevin Fisher (ARoadAwakening) that contains all four videos related to material we have covered thus far on Sodom and Gomorrah (with drone footage), Noah’s Ark (Turkish Park site), Red Sea Crossing (materials on the bottom), and the Ark of the Covenant (garden tomb site): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nFq6PCmj24

Week #20; Wed, 5/16/18: Num. 7–11

Week #20; Wed, May 16: Num. 7:1–11:35

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

CHAPTER 7: Following the setting of the tabernacle by Moses, 12 days of offerings were made by the chiefs of the tribes of Israel for it’s consecration. The altar was anointed and dedicated with offerings from the chiefs of Israel as well.
CHAPTER 8: The Lord also spoke to Moses to have Aaron set up the seven lamps in front of the lampstands. Additionally, the Lord spoke to Moses instructing him on the cleansing of the Levites for service to the Lord; offerings were made and they were separated for service to the Lord at the tent of meeting. The Levites were wholly given to the Lord by the people of Israel instead of the firstborn of both man and beast as in Egypt. The Levites served from age 25 to 50 and no more; beyond that, they were considered retired.
CHAPTER 9: The Lord spoke to Moses to have the Passover observed at its appointed time. The cloud covered the tabernacle by day and appeared as fire by night. When the cloud moved, it was a sign for the people of Israel to break camp and move to where the cloud settled down. The time between movements varied form days to months. This way, the Lord led the people of Israel through the wilderness.
CHAPTER 10: Two silver trumpets were made for summoning the congregation and for breaking camp. These horns were used for gathering and alarms. They also signaled the tribes to set out by stages in the prescribed order of movement and when offerings were presented to the Lord. Two years and two months elapsed before the people of Israel were led by the Lord out of Sinai.

Note that Moses said to Hobab the son of Reuel, the MIDIANITE, Moses father-in-law, to come with the people of Israel to the place the Lord said, “I will give you.” That tells me that they were in the Saini of Arabia, beyond the Red Sea at that time at the mount of the Lord.

CHAPTER 11: The Lord heard the people complaining about manna and a craving for meat. Fire of the Lord burned among them. The Lord also heard Moses complaining about having too much to do so He appointed 70 elders to help Moses. The Lord provided meat to the people for 30 days until it came out of their nostrils and became loathsome to them because they rejected the Lord by saying, “Why did we come out of Egypt?” The Lord sent quail two cubits deep in the camp; those that had the craving were struck down while the meat was still between their teeth.

Week #21; Wed, 5/23/18: Num. 12–17

Week #21; Wed, May 23: Num. 12:1–17:13

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

NUMBERS 12:

Miriam and Aaron spoke against Moses and it kindled the Lord’s anger against them. Miriam became leprous and Moses pleaded with the Lord to heal her. The Lord required Miriam to be set outside the camp for seven days and then be allowed to return.

NUMBERS 13

The Lord told Moses to send men from each tribe to spy out the land of Canaan. All of the men were heads of the people of Israel. Moses wanted them to report on the strength of the people, the number of the people, the quality of the agricultural land (good or bad), the living conditions (cities or camps). When they returned, they brought back grapes, pomegranates and figs and stated that it flows with milk and honey. However, they reported that the people who dwell in the land are strong, and the cities are fortified and very large. But Caleb stated, “Let us go up at once and occupy it, for we are well able to overcome it.” The men that went up with Caleb disagreed, saying, “We are not able to go up against the people, for they are stronger than we are.”

NUMBERS 14

The people begin to rebel and grumble against Moses and Aaron saying, they preferred to go back to Egypt under new leadership. Joshua intervened restating that the land is an exceedingly good land and with the Lord, the land could be taken. The Glory of the Lord prevented them from being stoned. The Lord threatened to destroy them but Moses intercedes for the people. He spoke to the Lord in a convincing manner to pardon the iniquity of the people through His steadfast love. The Lord agrees but promises judgment; the rebels will not go over into the land. Because Caleb has a different spirit and followed the Lord fully, he and his descendants will go into the land and possess it. But all of those numbered in the census shall not come into the land, they will fall in the wilderness. Apparently, this accounts for the 40 years it took for all of the rebels to fall in the wilderness. The men who brought a bad report about the land died by plague before the Lord. The people reasoned it best that they enter the land on their own to take it, but Moses warned them that the Lord is not with you because you have turned back from following the Lord and he cautioned against invading the land. The rebels suffered a major defeat.

NUMBERS 15

Sacrifices were specified by the Lord when the people were to come into the land; they were governed by an intricate set of laws for the people and the sojourners with the people. Laws about unintentional sins were published about a sin attributed to a mistake; those breaking this law were to be cut off from the people unless atoned by sacrifice. However, when a breaker of the Sabbath laws was discovered, he was executed as instructed by the Lord to Moses. The Lord also told Moses to inform the people to make blue tassels for their garments to “remind them to remember (and do) the commandments, not to follow after your own heart and your own eyes, which they inclined to whore after.”

NUMBERS 16

Korah and a band of men of 250 (chiefs of the congregation, not descendants of Aaron) rose up against Moses for exalting themselves above the assembly of the Lord. But, the Lord destroyed the rebels by fire and their families were swallowed in the ground under them in a split that opened up and closed over them taking them down alive into Sheol. More rebellion followed and the Lord brought on a plague that destroyed an additional 14,700 of the people.

NUMBERS 17

The Lord spoke to Moses saying have the people bring the staff of each of the father’s house of the twelve tribes and place them in the tent of meeting to allow for the choosing of the one to stop the grumblings. Aaron’s staff from the house of Levi was chosen for it had budded. It was to be be put back in the tent of testimony to be kept as a sign for the rebels, that they may make an end of their grumblings against the Lord lest they die.

Week #22; Wed, 5/30/18: Num. 18–23

Week #22; Wed, May 30: Num. 18:1–23:30

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

NUMBERS 18: DUTIES OF PRIESTS AND LEVITES

1. AARON AND HIS SONS ALONG WITH THE TRIBE OF LEVI WERE TO MINISTER BEFORE THE TENT OF TESTIMONY, THE TENT OF MEETING, AND GUARD THE PRIESTHOOD

2. THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF THE GIFTS AND OFFERINGS WERE GIVEN TO AARON, HIS SONS, AND THE LEVITES AS A PERPETUAL DUE SINCE THEY DID NOT HAVE A LAND ASSIGNED TO THEM AS AN INHERITANCE; IT WAS A REWARD IN RETURN FOR SERVICE IN THE TENT OF MEETING.

3. SELECT ANIMALS WERE SACRIFICED AS A FOOD OFFERING WITH A PLEASING AROMA TO THE LORD; THEIR BLOOD WAS SPRINKLED ON THE ALTAR. THE MEAT WAS RESERVED FOR THE PRIESTS.

4. THE TITHE OF THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL PRESENTED TO THE LORD WAS GIVEN TO THE LEVITES FOR AN INHERITANCE.

NUMBERS 19: LAWS OF PURIFICATION

1. RED HEIFERS WITHOUT BLEMISH AND NEVER UNDER A YOKE WERE SLAUGHTERED AS A SACRIFICE

2. TOUCHING A DEAD BODY RESULTED IN BEING UNCLEAN; THE WATER FOR IMPURITY MUST BE THROWN ON THAT PERSON.

3. WHEN A PERSON DIES IN A TENT, SPECIFIC ACTION WAS NECESSARY TO OVERCOME UNCLEANLINESS.

NUMBERS 20: DEATH OF MIRIAM

1. MIRIAM DIED IN KADESH AND WAS BURIED THERE IN THE WILDERNESS OF ZIN

2. THE WATERS OF MERIBAH RESULTED FROM THE GURMBLINGS OF THE PEOPLE FOR THE LACK OF WATER.

3. MOSES AND AARON APPEARED BEFORE THE GLORY OF THE LORD AND RECEIVED A COMMAND TO STRIKE THE ROCK OF MERIBAH WITH MOSES’ STAFF RESULTING IN WATER FOR THE PEOPLE AND THEIR LIVESTOCK

4. SINCE MOSES AND AARON DID NOT GIVE THE LORD THE HONOR DUE FOR THE WATER, THEY WERE DENIED PERMISSION TO ENTER INTO THE PROMISED LAND.

5. EDOM REFUSED PASSAGE TO THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL TO PASS THROUGH ON THEIR WAY TO THE PROMISED LAND.

6. AARON DIED ON MOUNT HOR ON THE BORDER OF THE LAND OF EDOM; HE NEVER MADE IT TO THE PROMISED LAND AND HIS SON, ELEAZAR WAS APPOINTED TO TAKE AARON’S POSITION.

NUMBERS 21: ARAD DESTROYED

1. WHEN THE CANAANITE KING FOUGHT AGAINST ISRAEL THE LORD DEVOTED THEM AND THEIR CITIES TO DESTRUCTION.

2. WHILE GOING AROUND EDOM, THE PEOPLE BECAME IMPATIENT AND AGAIN THEY SPOKE AGAINST GOD AND MOSES.

3. THEN THE LORD SENT FIERY SERPENTS AMONG THE PEOPLE AND SOME WERE BITTEN AND DIED.

4. SO MOSES PRAYED FOR THE PEOPLE AND THE LORD SAID TO MOSES, “MAKE A FIREY SERPENT AND SET IT ON A POLE.” WHEN A PERSON WHO IS BITTEN SEES IT, THEY WILL LIVE.

5. AGAIN WATER WAS PROVIDED TO THE PEOPLE FROM A WELL AT BEER IN THE WILDERNESS.

6. SIHON, KING OF THE AMORITES, REFUSED PASSAGE TO THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL AND HE WENT OUT AGAINST ISRAEL AND FOUGHT THEM, BUT THE AMORITES WERE DEFEATED.

7. KING OG OF BASHAN WAS LIKEWISE DEFEATED WHEN HE CAME OUT AGAINST THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL.

NUMBERS 22: BALAK SUMMONS BALAAM

1. FEES FOR DIVATION WERE PAID TO BALAAM BY BALAK FOR SUPPORT IN BATTLE WITH THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL.

2. GOD TOLD BALAAM NOT TO SUPPORT BALAK.

3. BUT, A SECOND REQUEST FOR SUPPORT WAS APPROVED BY GOD TO BALAAM.

4. THE ANGER OF GOD WAS KINDLED AGAINST BALAAM BECAUSE HE WENT WITH THE PRINCES OF BALAK/MOAB.

5. THE ANGEL OF THE LORD TOOK HIS STAND WITH DRAWN SWORD IN THE WAY OF BALAAM.

6. BALAAM’S DONKEY SAW THE ANGEL FIRST AND STOPPED. BALAAM’S DONKEY SPOKE TO HIM AND BALAAM FINALLY SAW THE ANGEL.

7. THE ANGEL COMMANDED BALAAM TO ONLY SPEAK WHAT HE WAS TOLD.

NUMBERS 23: BALAAM’S ORACLES

1. BALAAM TOLD BALAK TO BUILD SEVEN ALTARS AND PREPARE SEVEN BULLS AND RAMS FOR A BURNT OFFERING.

2. GOD MET BALAAM AND TOLD HIM TO RETURN TO BALAK AND INSTRUCTED HIM ON WHAT TO SPEAK

3. BALAAM WAS NOT TO SUPPORT BALAK BY CURSING ISRAEL.

4. BALAK PERSISTED, SEEKING BALAAM TO COME WITH HIM TO A SECOND PLACE TO CURSE ISRAEL THERE.

5. THE MESSAGE FROM BALAAM TO BALAK WAS THE SAME; HE WAS INSTRUCTED BY GOD NOT TO CURSE ISRAEL.

Week #23; Wed, 6/06/18: Num. 24–30

Week #23; Wed, Jun 06: Num. 24:1–30:16

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

NUMBERS 24: Balaam’s Third Oracle
1. Balaam gives up on omens when he sees that it pleased the Lord to bless Israel.
2. The Spirit of the Lord came upon Balaam and his eye was opened.
3. So, regarding Israel, Balaam says, “Blessed are those who bless you, and cursed are those who curse you.”
4. Balaam held on to his position, “What the Lord speaks, that will I speak.”
5. Three times Balaam held true to this position with Balak.
6. Balaam gives a final oracle with opened eyes, ears who hear the Lord, and knowledge of the Most High.
7. A star shall come out of Jacob, and a scepter shall rise out of Israel; it shall crush the forehead of Moab and break down all the sons of Sheth. Amalek will end in destruction. Kain shall be burned by Asshur, but Kittim shall afflict Asshur and Eber and brought to destruction.
8. Balaam and Balak went their own way.

NUMBERS 25: Baal Worship at Peor
1. When Israel began to follow the gods of Peor, the anger of the Lord came out against Israel and the chiefs of the people were hanged along with all of the men who have yoked themselves to Baal of Peor.
2. When Zimri, one of the people of Israel brought Cozbi, a Midianite woman, into his tent before the camp of Israel, Phinehas, son of Aaron the priest, Phinehas took his spear and pierced them both thus ending the plague against Israel, but not before 24,000 had died.
3. Phinehas was given the Lord’s covenant of perpetual priesthood because he was jealous for his God and made atonement for the people of Israel.
4. The Lord told Moses to strike down the Midianites.

NUMBERS 26: Census of the New Generation
1. The Lord said to Moses and to Eleazar to take another census of all the congregation of the people of Israel from 20 years and up.
2. The list of the people of Israel was 601,730 9 (versus 603,550 in the first census in Sinai).
3. The Lord spoke to Moses, saying, “Among these the land shall be divided for inheritance according to the number of names.”
4. The inheritance shall be divided by lot between the larger and the smaller clans within the tribes.
5. The Levites were separate according to their clans.
6. Not one of those listed by Moses and Aaron the priest, who had listed the people of Israel in the wilderness of Sinai 40 years earlier, were left except Caleb, son of Jephunneh and Joshua, the son of Nun.

NUMBERS 27: The Daughters of Zelophehad
1. Mahlah, Noah, Hoglah, Milcah, and Tirzah came before Moses and Eleazar stating, “Our father died in the wilderness. He was not among the company of those who gathered themselves together against the Lord in the company of Korah, but died for his own sin. And he had no sons. Why should the name of our father be taken away from his clan because he had no son?”
2. When Moses brought their case before the Lord, He said the daughters of Zelophehad are right. You shall give them possession of an inheritance too.
3. Also, it was to be a statute in Israel and rule that an inheritance shall pass from a man to his daughters if he has no son, else to his brothers, then his father’s brothers, then nearby kinsman of his clan.
4. The Lord said to Moses, “Go up into this mountain of Abarim and see the land that I have given to the people of Israel.” There you will be gathered to your people and die.
5. Because Moses rebelled against the Lord’s word in the wilderness of Zin when the congregation quarreled and he did not uphold the Lord as holy at the waters of Meribah, it would be Joshua who would be commissioned with authority to lead the people of Israel.

NUMBERS 28: Daily offerings, Sabbath offerings, Monthly offerings, Passover offerings, and the Feast of Weeks

1. Food, regular, grain, burnt, sin, and drink offerings were specified for appointed times using lambs, bulls, grain, oil, rams, wine, goats
2. No ordinary work shall not be done
3. Offerings must not have any blemish
4. A holy convocation was specified for particular days for these offerings

NUMBERS 29: Offerings for the Feast of Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and the Feast of Boots

1. A holy convocation for blowing trumpets was assigned with a burnt offering without blemish; no work was permitted.
2. The new moon was observed with a burnt offering as well.
3. The Day of Atonement was on the tenth day of the seventh month
4. The Feast of Booths was on the fifteenth day of the seventh month and lasted for eight days.
5. A vow offering and a freewill offering was also observed.

NUMBERS 30: Vows by men and women

1. Moses stated, “This is what the Lord commands, If a man vows a vow to the Lord, or swears an oath to bind himself by a pledge, he shall not break his word.”
2. Women were included with additional provisions pertaining to her father or her husband.

Week #24; Wed, 6/13/18: Num. 31–36

Week #24; Wed, Jun 13: Num. 31:1–36:13

PERSONAL OBSERVATION: It was a real personal pleasure to see that one member in our Bible Study group just finished the entire 3-year Bible Study schedule last week. His comment to me was that once he put “Faith Comes by Hearing” on a USB memory stick and plugged it into his car radio, he just kept playing it anytime he was in his car/home setting. Voila! Done in five months. If you want to proceed ahead of our schedule, I encourage you to do so. Please let the rest of us know how you are doing. “BZ” to Lt.Gen. Steven Hummer, USMC (ret.)!

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

NUMBERS 31: Vengeance on Midian
1. Moses is about to be gathered to the Lord, but first, Midian must be defeated.
2. Notice that Balaam (the local divinatory), son of Beor, was killed with the sword in the defeat of Midian. Not a man was missing from Israel’s warriors.
3. The spoils of Midian were divided among the warriors and the congregation of Israel, with a contribution for the Lord to Eleazar the priest and the Levites.

NUMBERS 32: Reuben and Gad Settle in Gilead
1. The land of Gilead was perfect for livestock and Reuben and Gad had livestock, so they requested that they be allowed to settle in Gilead and not go across the Jordan River.
2. But Moses and the Lord demanded that the warriors of Reuben and Gad cross over the Jordan and do battle with the other tribes of Israel while leaving women, children and livestock behind.
3. The warriors of Reuben and Gad could return to the east side of the Jordan to inherit the land once the inhabitants of Canaan were defeated.

NUMBERS 33: Recounting Israel’s Journey
1. The people of Israel departed Egypt from Rameses on the 15th day of the first month, the day after Passover.
2. In the fortieth year after the people of Israel had come out of the land of Egypt; it was the 1st day of the fifth month which also marks the death of Aaron, the priest.
3. Aaron was 123 years old when he died on Mount Hor.
4. Upon arriving at the plains of Moab by the Jordan, the Lord spoke to Moses saying, “When you pass over the Jordan into the land of Canaan, then you shall drive out all the inhabitants of the land from before you and destroy all their figured stones, and destroy all their metal images and demolish all their high places. And you shall take possession of the land and settle in it, for I have given the land to you to possess it.”
5. The Lord also said, “But if you do not drive out the inhabitants of the land from before you, then those of them whom you let remain shall be as barbs in your eyes and thorns in your sides and they shall trouble you in the land where you dwell. And I will do to you as I thought to do to them.”

NUMBERS 34: Boundaries of the Land
1. The land of Canaan’s borders are defined with landmarks on the south, west, north and east for the nine tribes and the half-tribe of Manasseh.
2. The other two tribes and the half-tribe have received their inheritance beyond the Jordan east of Jericho, toward the sunrise.
3. Chiefs of the tribes were named by the Lord to divide the inheritance for the people of Israel in the land of Canaan.

NUMBERS 35: Cities for the Levites
1 The Lord spoke to Moses in the plains of Moab by the Jordan at Jericho, saying, “Command the people of Israel to give the Levites some of the inheritance of the possession as cities for them to dwell in.
2 The cities for the Levites shall be 48, including six cities of refuge, where a manslayer may flee.
3 The six cities of refuge were for anyone who kills any person without intent to flee there.
4 The one who flees could be put to death if he killed the person deliberately.
5 No person shall be put to death on the testimony of one witness.

NUMBERS 36: Marriage of Female Heirs
1. The daughters of Zelophehad must marry within the clan of the tribe of their father to maintain the balance of inheritance within each tribe.
2. The inheritance of the people of Israel shall not be transferred from one tribe to another, for every one of the people of Israel shall hold on to the inheritance of the tribe of his fathers.

Week #25; Wed, 6/20/18: Dt. 1–5

Week #25; Wed, Jun 20: Deuteronomy 1:1–5:33

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Just watched a short video on Gods411 on “How to Read the Bible” that contains three practical steps:
1. Pray for God to interpret the Bible as you read; find God’s meaning not ours.
2. Read with the Gospel in mind; it is easier to read within the context of the whole Bible (past, present, future).
3. Read the Bible to know God; not to just gain knowledge about God. Seek a connection and relationship.
Me thinks that this approach is like plugging in a lamp (connect to a receptacle, turn on the switch to receive the power, light up your life with a face to face relationship with Jesus). You may be thinking that is hard to do in the OT; however, whenever you see the term “The Angel of the Lord” pause and reflect on the “Alpha” and the “Omega” with a “Trinitarian” scope. I’m told that the canonization of the Bible was based on the “blood line” of Christ appearing in all 66 books.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

DEUTERONOMY 1: Leaving Horeb-the long way around
1. Go to the land and take possession of it; the land that was promised to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob, to give to them and to their offspring after them. Note that God restates in broad terms the boundaries of the land of milk and honey. An example of my observations above comes to mind here when we compare the function of boundaries to today in Acts 17:26-27 pertaining to our own borders. Also, see Rev. 21-22 for more on boundaries in heaven. The use of boundaries is the same then, now and future.
2. Multiplication of the children of Israel dictated appointment of leaders for each tribe.
3. Leaders shall not be partial in judgment. The same applies to today.
4. When Israel became fearful, they refused to go into the land to occupy it. But God told them to not be fearful; He will go before them and He will fight for them. Note where God employs “hornets” on the enemies of Israel.
5. That generation that rebelled, was denied going into the Promised Land; that is why the people of Israel were forced to live in the wilderness for forty years until those fearful ones died. Only Caleb and Joshua lived through the time in the wilderness because they were willing to enter into the land.

DEUTERONOMY 2: The Wilderness Years
1. Thirty-eight years elapsed from the time Israel was sent back to the wilderness from Kadesh-barnia (notice how your Bible maps indicate a reverse loop back to the Red Sea during this period after almost being at the land God promised them)
2. As soon as all the men of war had perished, the Lord led them back to Moab at Ar. So they rose up and set out.
3. The occupants of the land became fearful and were in anguish hearing of Israel’s approach.
4. Sihon, king of Sihon and Og, king of Bashan were given into the hands of Israel by the Lord.

DEUTERONOMY 3: Moses Forbidden to Enter the Land
1. God directed Moses up to the top of Mt. Pisgah and lift his eyes to see the land, but he was not permitted to go into the land beyond the Jordan.

DEUTERONOMY 4: Moses Commands Obedience
1. Moses instructs the people to follow the commandments of the Lord your God that he commanded them when you go in to take possession of the land.
2. Also, teach them to the children and their children.
3. The Ten Commandments were written on two tablets of stone
4. Idolatry is forbidden; no carved images-not even the heavens, sun, moon, or stars.
5. The Lord God in heaven above and on the earth beneath is the only God; there is no other.
6. Cities of refuge were set apart for safety for the manslayer, both intentional and accidental.

DEUTERONOMY 5: The Ten Commandments
1. Before he died, Moses summoned all Israel to hear the statutes and rules they were to follow that were contained in the covenant of the law given at Mount Horeb out of the midst of the fire.
2. #4 is a commandment with a promise of long life and good will.
3. All others combined include the same promise.

Week #26; Wed, 6/27/18: Dt. 6–12

Week #26; Wed, Jun 27: Dt. 6:1–12:32

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Chapter six eliminates any wiggle room with an element of fear of the Lord. Note what goes on your doorposts and gates as reminder. I find the term “Deuteronomy 5&6” will generally fit in the name holder of a front doorbell. Tada, then we can “fess-up” each time the bell is rung. Note how all the enemies in the Promised Land were to be thrown out to discourage the people from following their gods. The voice of Moses is blunt and clear in these chapters; Jesus tells us to keep the Commandments too.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

DEUTERONOMY 6: The Greatest Commandment
1. Note how “fear of the Lord” is a major component in “keeping” all his statutes and his commandments.
2. This “keeping” is followed by a promise that the people’s days may be long, it may go well with them, and they will multiply greatly.
3. The Lord our God, the Lord is one.
4. You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might.
5. Moses told the people that, “These words shall be on your heart.”
6. “You shall teach them diligently to your children, and shall talk of them when you sit in your house, and when you walk by the way, and when you lie down, and when you rise.”
7. “You shall bind them as a sign on your hand, and they shall be as frontlets between your eyes.”
8. “You shall write them on the doorposts of your house and on your gates.”
9. “It is the Lord your God you shall fear.”
10. “Him you shall serve and by his name you shall swear.”
11. “You shall not go after other gods.” Else, destruction from the God in our midst.
12. “You shall not put the Lord your God to the test, as you tested him at Massa.
13. The people were to thrust out all their enemies in the land the Lord swore to give them.

DEUTERONOMY 7: A Chosen People
1. The Lord will clear away many more powerful nations (seven) before the people as they enter the land.
2. No covenants; no mercy, only complete destruction.
3. No intermarriage with the enemies to avoid being led away to serve other gods.
4. They must break down their altars, pillars, Asherim, and burn the carved images of the enemy.
5. Hornets will be sent among the enemies of the people to destroy them.
6. Clearing out the nations must be done little by little, not all at once.

DEUTERONOMY 8: Remember the Lord Your God
1. The commandments, rules, and statutes are to be carefully followed.
2. “Man does not live by bread alone, but man lives by every word that comes from the mouth of the Lord.”
3. For forty years in the wilderness their clothing did not wear out and their feet did not swell.
4. Manna prevented their hunger in the desert.

DEUTERONOMY 9: Not Because of Righteousness
1. This chapter records the day the people were to cross over the Jordan to take possession of the land.
2. They would be successful not because of their righteousness, but because of the wickedness of the nations the Lord God is driving out.
3. This confirms the word that the Lord swore to Abraham, Isaac, and to Jacob.
4. The people were cautioned to remember how quickly they rebelled against the Lord in the wilderness where they created a metal image of a golden calf for themselves.

DEUTERONOMY 10: New Tablets of Stone
1. The ark was built to hold the two new stones with the Ten Commandments to replace the first two that were broken by Moses.
2. The Levites were set aside to carry the ark of the covenant with the two new stones containing the Ten Commandments.
3. Moses stayed on the Mountain of God for forty days and nights fasting without bread or water prior to receiving the stones with the Ten Commandments each time they were prepared by the finger of God out of the midst of the fire.
4. While we are to be conscious of God’s allotted boundaries (Acts 17:26-27), we are to love the sojourner (Dt., verse 19).

DEUTERONOMY 11: Love and Serve the Lord
1. The great works of the Lord are summarized by Moses covering bondage in Egypt and leading up to going into the Promised Land.
2. The people are cautioned to be careful to do the commandments, statutes, and rules given by the Lord.
3. The larger boundary of the land is restated (the wilderness, Lebanon, Euphrates River, western sea).
4. A blessing on Mount Gerizim (to obey the commandments) and a curse on Mount Ebal (to go after other gods) are pronounced by Moses.

DEUTERONOMY 12: The Lord’s Chosen Place of Worship
1. The “Lord’s chosen place for worship” will be identified from one of the tribes upon crossing the Jordan.

Week #27; Wed, 7/04/18: Dt. 13–20

Week #27; Wed, Jul 04: Dt. 13:1–20:20

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Chapter 19, along with Acts 17:26-27 and Romans 13, says a lot about how we should treat borders and boundaries. They are set by the Lord, not us; we are the caretakers.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

DEUTERONOMY 13: Warning Against Idolatry
1. As a test to know whether the people of Israel love the Lord their God with all their heart and with all their soul, He may send a prophet or a dreamer of dreams giving signs to follow other gods.
2. These dreamers were to be put to death, because they have taught rebellion against the Lord (including family).
3. The Lord may turn from the fierceness of His anger and show mercy if the people obey the voice of the Lord, keeping all the commandments and doing what is right in the sight of the Lord your God.

DEUTERONOMY 14: Clean and Unclean Food
1. The Lord has chosen the people out of all the peoples of the earth to be a treasured possession.
2. They shall not cut themselves or make any baldness on their foreheads for the dead.
3. The people were cautioned not to eat any abominable animals as listed (note the relationship to the cud and the hoofs, the fins and scales, and listed birds).
4. Caution is given not to boil a young goat in its mother’s milk.
5. Peter’s dream of a sheet with animals gives relief from these rules in Acts 10:28)
6. Tithes shall be given for the works of the hand or with a monetary equivalent. Matthew 23:23 pertains to tithing in the New Testament and is based on the Old Testament Law.

DEUTERONOMY 15: The Sabbatical Year
1. Every creditor shall release what he has lent to his neighbor (except for the sojourner) every seventh year).
2. There should be no poor among you (verse 4).
3. You shall lend to many nations, but you shall not borrow.
4. You shall give to the poor freely, and your heart shall not be grudging when you give to him.
5. A Hebrew brother or sister that becomes poor shall be supplied freely and may serve another Hebrew until the seventh year.
6. The firstborn (without blemish) of all the flocks are to be dedicated to the Lord (note how blood should be poured out on the ground.)

DEUTERONOMY 16: Passover
1. In addition to observing the Passover to remember being taken out of bondage in Egypt, a sacrifice from the herd will be offered to the Lord.
2. Unleavened bread shall be eaten with it at the time and place prescribed by the Lord.
3. Seven days of the Passover are to be observed while doing no work.
4. The Feast of Weeks is to be observed after seven weeks from the time the sickle is first put to the standing grain.
5. The Feast of Booths is to be observed for seven days after gathering the produce from the threshing floor and the winepress.
6. Justice will be performed by judges and officers in all towns that the Lord has given.
7. No partiality or bribes are permitted.
8. Worship that is prescribed by God will not be perverted (i.e., pillars).

DEUTERONOMY 17: Legal Decisions by Judges and Kings
1. Sacrifices will be without blemish.
2. Stoning to death will be the sentence for the man or woman that has served other gods and worshiped them.
3. Two or more witnesses are required for stoning.
4. Evil is to be purged from the midst of the people.
5. Difficult legal decisions are to be rendered by the priests.
6. The verdict of the priest shall be followed.
7. Israel’s kings must be appointed from within the people only.
8. Israel shall not return to Egypt again.
9. The king shall read from the book of laws daily and ensure that the laws are followed.

DEUTERONOMY 18: Provision for Priests and Levites
1. No provisions shall be made for the Levitical priests (i.e., no inheritance).
2. They shall subsist from the people’s offerings to the Lord.
3. The priests are to stand and minister in the name of the Lord for all time.
4. No abominable practices (i.e., sacrificing children, divination, telling fortunes, interpreting omens, sorcerers, charmers, mediums, necromancers, inquiring of the dead, etc.).
5. A new prophet, like Moses will be raised up (John 1:21, 25 pertains).

DEUTERONOMY 19: Laws Concerning Cities of Refuge
1. Three cities shall be set apart so that any manslayer can flee to them.
2. Cities may be expanded to six cities when all the land is taken that was promised to the fathers.
3. If the manslayer kills accidentally, he may stay in the city; however, if the manslayer killed intentionally, that person must be turned over to the avenger of blood, so that he may die.
4. Property boundaries set by the men of old must not be moved.

DEUTERONOMY 20: Laws Concerning Warfare
1. Warfare is to be preceded by the priest to encourage the soldiers not to be afraid as the Lord God goes with you (exceptions were made for building a new house, tending a new vineyard, betrothed to a new wife, fearful/fainthearted, etc.).
2. Conditions existed for the level of destruction for the enemies.
3. All abominable practices of the enemy were to be destroyed.

Week #28; Wed, 7/11/18: Dt. 21–27

Week #28; Wed, Jul 11: Dt. 21:1–27:26

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Our reading or the Pentateuch, the five books of Moses, will be completed by the end of July. We will be well equipped to address the remaining 61 books of God’s word and see how God’s hand continues to move us, even today and in days to come.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

DEUTERONOMY 21: Atonement for Unsolved Murders
1. A very deliberate plan is laid out to atone for the shedding of innocent blood with the sacrifice of a heifer.
2. Marrying female captives also required a very deliberate plan with conditions to be met.
3. The rights of the firstborn are spelled out for a man that has two wives.
4. A rebellious son risks being stoned by the elders of the city to purge evil from their midst.

DEUTERONOMY 22: Various Laws
1. A loose ox or sheep (or any lost thing of a brother) shall not be ignored, but returned.
2. Apparel for men and women must not be interchanged, it is an abomination to the Lord God.
3. Care for birds and their nests must be done in a special way.
4. Construction of houses, sowing a vineyard, plowing a field, and making cloth for garments are to be performed observing specific practices.
5. Sexual immorality resulted in specific remedies for both the man and woman, involving parents and the elders of the city; stoning could result.

DEUTERONOMY 23: Exclusion from the Assembly
1. Those excluded from the assembly of the Lord must have failed tests otherwise met by those allowed into the assembly.
2. Uncleanness from evil must be kept.
3. Failing to remain clean resulted in being denied entry into the camp until purified with water.
4. The grounds of the camp must be kept clean of excrement or anything indecent.
5. Other specific laws must be observed (i.e., slaves, prostitution, charging interest on loans, vows, property of a neighbor).

DEUTERONOMY 24: Laws Concerning Divorce
1. A certificate of divorce must be written and delivered under several conditions.
2. Miscellaneous laws involved serving in the army when newly married, pledges, stealing, diseases, oppression of a hired servant that is poor and needy.
3. Death for sin is limited to one’s own sins, not those of other generations.
4. Justice shall not be perverted.
5. Sojourners, the fatherless, and the widow are to be allowed to glean the remains of a harvest.

DEUTERONOMY 25: Disputes
1. Forty stripes is the limit for disputes between men coming to court when one is guilty.
2. Do not muzzle an ox when it is treading out the grain.
3. Marriage for the levirate requires the wife of the dead man to marry the brother that has no son to perpetuate his brother’s name.
4. Conditions met while men are fighting may result in a sentence for a wife.
5. Weights and measures must be fair.

DEUTERONOMY 26: Offerings of First fruits and Tithes
1. First fruits are to be laid before the altar of the Lord God in gratitude for the Lord God taking His children out of bondage in Egypt and taking them to the land of milk and honey.
2. Tithes in the year of tithing (the third year), are to be set aside as a sacred portion for the Lord God.
3. Thus the Lord God declared you are a people for his treasured possession, and you are to keep all his commandments.
4. You will be a people holy to the Lord God as He promised.

DEUTERONOMY 27: The Altar on Mount Ebal
1. Moses and the elders of Israel commanded the people, saying, “Keep the whole commandment that I command you today. And on the day you cross over the Jordan to the land that the Lord your God is giving you, you shall set up large stones and plaster them with plaster. And you shall write on them all the words of the law, when you cross over to enter the land that the Lord you God is giving you.
2. The stones shall be placed on Mount Ebal, as an altar for burnt offerings to the Lord God.
3. Blessings flowed from Mount Gerizim by elders: Simeon, Levi, Judah, Issachar, Joseph, and Benjamin.
4. Curses flowed from Mount Ebal by elders: Reuben, Gad, Asher, Zebulun, Dan, and Naphtali.
5. Curses came for: carved images, dishonoring father and mother, moving a neighbor’s landmark, misleading the blind, perverting justice, adultery, defiling one’s self with an animal, murder, bribery, failure to confirming the words of the law by not doing them.

Week #29; Wed, 7/18/18: Dt. 28–32

Week #29; Wed, Jul 18: Dt. 28:1–32:52

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Our reading of the Pentateuch, the five books of Moses, will be completed by the end of July. This 17 percent of God’s Word lays a solid foundation to build on as we continue.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

DEUTERONOMY 28: Blessings for Obedience
1. If the voice of the Lord God is faithfully obeyed, being careful to do all his commandments, the Lord will set his people high above all the nations of the earth.
2. Blessings will be delivered when coming in and going out.
3. The Lord will cause your enemies who rise against you to be defeated before you.
4. The Lord will open to you his good treasury, the heavens, to give the rain to your land in its season and to bless all the work of your hand.
5. You shall lend to many nations, but you shall not borrow.
6. Do not go after any other gods.
7. Disobedience brings curses of confusion and frustration until siege and destruction is complete.
8. Much grief will be experienced under siege.

DEUTERONOMY 29: Renewed Covenant in Moab
1. In addition to the Lord’s covenant given at Horeb, the Lord commanded Moses to exclaim how he has not given his people a heart to understand, eyes to see, or ears to hear even after being led for 40 years in the wilderness where miracle after miracle was delivered.
2. The Lord exclaimed to Moses how his people are to keep the words of his covenant and do them, that they may prosper in all that they do.
3. The covenants are not just for his people alone, but with whoever is standing there with them that day and whoever is not with them that day (i.e., everyone).
4. A warning was given against turning away from the Lord God to go serve the gods of other nations, else the Lord will blot out his name from under heaven (the Lamb’s Book of Life pertains).
5. Sodom and Gomorrah pertains (see: blog posting of April 15 above for link to one of four videos)

DEUTERONOMY 30: Repentance and Forgiveness
1. If his people will return to the Lord God and obey his voice, he will restore your fortunes and have compassion on them.
2. He will gather them again from where he has scattered them.
3. He will put all the curses on their foes and enemies that persecuted them.
4. Note how the phrase “when YOU turn” reflects a personal decision. We are to choose.

DEUTERONOMY 31: Joshua to Succeed Moses
1. Moses was 120 years old when he was denied going over the Jordan to enter the land.
2. The Lord promised that he himself will go over the Jordan before his people.
3. He will destroy those nations so the people could dispossess them.
4. Joshua will go over as head of the people.
5. At the end of every seven years, at the set time in the year of release, at the Feast of Booths, when all Israel comes to appear before the Lord your God at the place that he will choose, you shall read this law before all Israel in the hearing.
6. Strong warning indicating the Lord’s anger will be kindled against the people for turning away from him once they cross over the Jordan.
7. The Book of Law was to be put into the Ark of the Covenant.

DEUTERONOMY 32: The Song of Moses
1. Moses said, “Let the earth hear the words of my mouth.”
2. As 29:3 above reveals, the Book of Law applied to all people.
3. Moses was denied crossing the Jordan, “because you broke faith with me in the midst of the people of Israel at the waters of Meribah-kadesh, in the wilderness of Zin, and because you did not treat me as holy in the midst of the people of Israel.”

Week #30; Wed, 7/25/18: Dt. 33-Jos. 6

Week #30; Wed, Jul 25, 2018: Dt. 33–Josh. 6

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Congratulations on our complete reading of the Pentateuch this week, approximately one-fifth of God’s Word. I find that even before Moses completed the first five books of the Bible prophetic talk of siege predicts disobedience and the consequences that are documented in the books that follow.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

DEUTERONOMY 33: Moses’ Final Blessing on Israel
1. Before his death, Moses blessed all twelve tribes of Israel and the Lord showed him all the land that was sworn to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob and their offspring.
2. The Lord said, “You shall not go over there.”

DEUTERONOMY 34: The Death of Moses
1. Moses died in the land of Moab opposite Beth-peor.
2. Moses was 120 years old.
3. Moses’ eye was undimmed and his vigor unabated.
4. The people of Israel wept for him for 30 days.
5. Joshua led the people from there for Moses had laid his hand on him at the word of God.

JOSHUA 1: God Commissions Joshua
1. The Lord said to Joshua, “Arise, go over this Jordan, you and all this people, into the land that I am giving to them, to the people of Israel.”
2. The land from Lebanon, the wilderness, the river Euphrates, the Great Sea (Mediterranean), to the going down of the sun (Egypt) will be included, just as promised to Moses.
3. No man shall be able to stand before Joshua.
4. The Lord said, “Just as I was with Moses, I will be with you.”
5. Joshua assumed command of Israel.
6. The Lord said, “Within three days, you are to pass over the Jordan.”
7. The Reubenites, Gadites, and the half-tribe of Manasseh were to leave families and livestock remained in the land east of the Jordan; the men were to pass over armed and help their brothers.
8. Those men could return to the east of the Jordan to take possession of the land Moses gave them.
9. Any who would disobey would be put to death.

JOSHUA 2: Rahab Hides the Spies
1. Rahab hid two spies sent by Joshua to spy out the land, especially Jericho.
2. Rahab requested that the two spies promise to spare her family from the pending battle for Jericho.
3. She tied a scarlet cord in her window that was part of the wall of the city to identify the location of her family during the battle for the city.
4. The two spies returned to Joshua to report what they had seen and about their oath to Rahab.

JOSHUA 3: Israel Crosses the Jordan
1. Joshua led Israel to the Jordan where they lodged for three days before crossing over.
2. The people were to follow the ark of the covenant of the Lord carried by the Levite priests.
3. A separation of 2,000 cubits must be maintained between the people and the ark of the covenant at all times.
4. Upon coming to the brink of the waters of the Jordan, the waters were cut off at Adam (about 25 miles upstream from the crossing site due to the large size of the body of Israel).
5. The people of Israel crossed over the Jordan near the ark of the covenant and 1 man was selected from the 12 tribes.
6. The priests bearing the ark of the covenant of the Lord stood firmly on dry ground amid the Jordan (which was at full overflowing during harvest time), and Israel passed over on dry ground as was done at the Red Sea.

JOSHUA 4: Twelve Memorial Stones from the Jordan
1. The twelve appointed men with the priests were told to select from the dry riverbed one stone each and take it before the ark of the covenant.
2. Joshua said, “These stones shall be to the people of Israel a memorial forever” to mark the location where the waters of the Jordan were cut off before the ark of the covenant.
3. When the people finished passing over, the ark of the covenant and the priests passed over.
4. The people were in awe of Joshua just as they were in awe of Moses.
5. When the soles of the priests’ feet (who were bearing the ark of the covenant) reached beyond the Jordan riverbed, the waters of the Jordan returned to their place as before.
6. The people encamped at Gilgal on the tenth day on the east border of Jericho and set up the twelve stones which they took out of the Jordan as a memorial for their children.
7. Also, the stone memorial marked for all the peoples of the earth that they may know that the hand of the Lord is mighty, that you may fear the Lord your God forever.

JOSHUA 5: Circumcision of the New Generation
1. A second circumcision of the sons of Israel took place a Gibeathhaaraloth (Gilgal).
2. Since all the males who came out of Egypt died in the wilderness, none of those born along the way were circumcised at Gilgal.
3. The Passover was observed on the plains of Jericho on the fourteenth day.
4. The manna ceased the day after the people ate the produce of the land.
5. The commander of the army of the Lord (Jesus?) appeared to Joshua saying, “Take off your sandals from your feet, for the place where you are standing is holy.” (Joshua complied.)

JOSHUA 6: Jericho Falls
1. Joshua, the men of war, seven priests with trumpets and the ark of the covenant marched around the city seven days and the walls of the city fell “flat” at great shouts and trumpets.
2. Rahab and her family were spared (the scarlet cord was their signal for protection).
3. Gold, silver, bronze, and iron went into the treasury of the Lord.

Week #31; Wed, 8/01/18: Josh. 7-11

Week #31; Wed, 8/01/18, 2018: Josh. 7:1-11:23

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Notice how chapter 10 accounts for the “sun standing still” now bringing NASA to make allowances in calculations for accurate space travel.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

JOSHUA 7: Israel Defeated at Ai
1. Due to devoted things being removed by Achan and Zabdi, of the tribe of Judah, the anger of the Lord burned against the people of Israel.
2. When Joshua sent men form Jericho to Ai to spy out the land, they returned saying only 3,000 men were needed to attack.
3. But, the 3,000 men fled before the men of Ai, losing about 36 men.
4. The hearts of the people of Israel melted.
5. Joshua tore his clothes and lamented to the Lord before the ark of the Lord.
6. The Lord commanded Joshua to get up and burn those who have taken the devoted things.
7. Achan and Zabdi confessed; Achan was selected by lot to be burned and stoned in the Valley of Achor.
8. The Lord then turned from his burning anger.

JOSHUA 8: The Fall of Ai
1. The Lord said to Joshua, “Take all the fighting men to Ai.”
2. The Lord said to Joshua, “You shall do to Ai as your did to Jericho.”
3. The Lord said to Joshua, “Lay in ambush behind it.”
4. Joshua took 30,000 men of valor with him.
5. Joshua set 5,000 in ambush who were to set the city on fire once the men of Ai leave to pursue Joshua’s 25,000 men in the main encampment.
6. Not a man was left in Ai (or Bethel) who did not go out after Israel; the city was open.
7. The ambush element captured and burned Ai, then they went out after Ai and it’s king striking them down as the Lord directed.
8. 12,000 men, women, and children of Ai fell by the hand of Israel; the king of Ai was hanged.
9. Joshua renews the covenant with the Lord by building an altar on Mt. Ebal and Mt. Gerizim, reading the words of the Law of Moses which the Lord had written.

JOSHUA 9: The Gibeonite Deception
1. When they heard of the defeat of Ai and it’s king, all of the kings in the surrounding cities gathered as one to fight against Joshua and Israel.
2. But, the Gibeonites acted with cunning by dressing with worn our garments and dry and crumbly provisions to meet Joshua and the Israelites.
3. The Gibeonites said to Joshua, “We are your servants.”
4. They claimed to be from a distant country coming to make a covenant of peace and servitude with Israel; Joshua made peace with them ignoring what the Lord commanded.
5. Because of the oath, they did not kill the Gibeonites, but made them cutters of wood and drawers of water.

JOSHUA 10: The Sun Stands Still
1. But the Amorite kings of Jerusalem, Hebron, Jarmuith, Lachish, and Eglon gathered up their forces and encamped against Gibeon and made war against it.
2. The men of Gibeon asked Joshua to save them from the five Amorite kings.
3. The Lord said to Joshua, “Do not fear them, for I have given them into your hands.”
4. The Lord threw down large hailstones on them and they died.
5. The sun and the moon stood still for a whole day until the nation of Israel took vengeance on their enemies.
6. The five Amorite kings were executed by hanging.
7. Makkedah, Gezer, Eglon, Hebron, Debir, Libnah, and the whole hill country,the Negeb, and the lowland/slopes was also captured and destroyed; none of the inhabitants remained, just as at Jericho.

JOSHUA 11: Conquests in Northern Canaan
1. Madon, Shimon, Achshaph, the northern hill country, the Arabah, Chinneroth, the lowland in Naphoth-dor, the Canaanites, the Amorites, the Hittites, the Perizzites, the Jebusites, the Hivites came to the waters of Merom to fight against Israel.
2. The Lord said to Joshua, “Do not fear them for I have given them into your hands.”
3. Joshua was told to ham-string their horses and burn their chariots with fire; he did.
4. Joshua also struck Hazor and the hill country, the Negev, Goshen and the lowlands, the Arabah and the hill country and it’s lowlands from Mount Halak, Baal-gad in the Valley of Lebanon below Mount Hermon.
5. Joshua took them all in battle.
6. The Lord devoted them all to destruction just as the Lord commanded Moses.
7. The Anakim from the hill country from Hebron, from Debir, from Anab, and from all the hill country of Judah and Israel were devoted to destruction by Joshua just as the Lord commanded Moses.
8. However, some of the Anakim were left to remain in Gaza, but Joshua took the whole land as the Lord had spoken to Moses.

ADMIN NOTES:

1. All Readings for each week are now contained in a separate posting rather than in a continuous stream under one post.

2. However, “Week #7” is out of proper order; use “Search” to find if needed; other minor repairs are also pending.

3. The blog page titled “4-Schedule” now contains 3rd and 4th Quarters for 2018. 2019 and 2020 will be added soon.

Week #32; Wed, 8/08/18: Josh. 12-19

Week #32; Wed, 8/08/2018, Josh. 12:1-19:51

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
Boundaries of the land are delineated both before and after the crossing of the Jordan. Apparently Moses was active in the defeat of the kings east of the Jordan and Joshua defeated the kings beyond the Jordan. As the tribes of Israel are allocated their inheritance, detailed boundaries of Israel are identified by God to Moses and Joshua forever.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

JOSHUA 12: Kings defeated by Moses and Joshua and the Allocation of Those Lands to the Tribes of Israel
1. Following victory by the people of Israel, Moses gave the lands east of the Jordan to the Reubenites, the Gadites, and the half-tribe of Manasseh.
2. Following 31 victories by the people of Israel on the west side of the Jordan, Joshua gave those lands to the remaining nine tribes and half the tribe of Manasseh.

JOSHUA 13: Land to be Conquered and Inheritance East of the Jordan
1. Very much land remained to possess and Joshua was getting old.
2. God himself told Joshua that He Himself will drive out the inhabitants before the people of Israel.
3. Joshua was to include the dividing of this additional land for an inheritance to the remaining nine tribe and half the tribe of Manasseh.
4. However, the people of Israel did not drive out the Geshurites or the Maacathites.
5. Only the Levites did not receive an inheritance; the offerings by fire to the Lord God of Israel are their inheritance.

JOSHUA 14: Inheritance West of the Jordan and Caleb’s Request and Inheritance
1. The inheritance that all the people received was done by lot.
2. The Levites did not receive land as an inheritance.
3. Caleb came to Joshua explaining that Moses sent him and his brothers to spy out the land when he was 40. This was before the crossing of the Jordan, but now Caleb was old.
4. Caleb, now at 85 and still a strong man, requested the “hill country” inheritance Moses promised him.
5. Joshua blessed him and gave him Hebron.

JOSHUA 15: Judah’s Allotment
1. Details for the boundaries of Judah are given.
2. Caleb’s portion is reiterated.
3. In Caleb’s clearing of the inhabitants from his inheritance, he invited his leaders to capture Debir/Kiriath-sepher, promising to give his daughter to the victor.
4. Othniel, Caleb’s brother, captured it and he gave him Achsaah his daughter as wife.
5. But the Jebusites, the inhabitants of Jerusalem, could not be driven out by the people of Judah.

JOSHUA 16: Ephraim and Manasseh’s Allotment
1. The allotment of the people of Joseph (Manasseh and Ephraim) was assigned.
2. However, they did not drive out the Canaanites, so they were made to do forced labor for the people of Israel.

JOSHUA 17: Ephraim and Manasseh’s Allotment (cont.)
1. The allotment to Manasseh (the firstborn to Joseph) was made.
2. Then the allotment was made to Machir (the firstborn of Manasseh) and to the rest of the people of Manasseh by their clans by male descendants.
3. The five daughters that were descendants of Zelophehad were his only children and they approached Eleazar and Joshua requesting an inheritance like the brothers of their father.
4. The Canaanites persisted in dwelling in that land even though being put to forced labor; they were not driven out.
5. The people of Joseph (Ephraim and Manasseh) were many and needed more land since the hill country of Ephraim is too small and narrow.
6. They approached Joshua for more land and he granted them two allotments, but required them to clear the forests of the hill country inhabited by the Canaanites, though they have chariots of iron and though they are strong.

JOSHUA 18: Allotment of Remaining Land and the Inheritance for Benjamin
1. The people of Israel assembled at Shiloh and set up the tent of meeting there where the land was already subdued.
2. Here at Shiloh the seven tribes that still needed allotments were required to go and survey the land with three men from each and divide it into seven portions and bring it to Joshua.
3. Joshua cast lots for the portions of land, one for each tribe.
4. Benjamin’s inheritance came up as the first lot. It’s boundaries and cities are described.

JOSHUA 19: Simeon, Zebulun, Issachar, Asher, Naphtali, Dan, and Joshua’s Inheritance
1. The remaining tribe inheritances were assigned by lot for the remaining portions of land and its cities.
2. So, the dividing of the land was finished.

Week #33; Wed, 8/15/18: Joshua 20-Judges 1

Week #33; Wed, 8/15/18, Joshua 20-Judges 1

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
It appears tight controls were placed over the “cities of refuge” as directed by God through Moses and Joshua. Also, the risk of war broke out at Shiloh between the tribes on the east and on the west of the Jordan due to construction of the altar of “Witness” by the two and one-half tribes that live on the east side of the river. Upon engaging in battle with the inhabitants of the land, many could not be completely overthrown and driven out, but they were ultimately made subject of forced labor.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
JOSHUA 20: The Cities of Refuge
1. A manslayer who strikes any person without “intent” or “unknowingly” may flee there.
2. They shall be a refuge from the avenger of blood.
3. One who flees to one of these cities must explain his case to the elders of that city at the gate before entering.
4. The individual will not be turned over to the avenger.
5. He shall be given a place and remain with them until he has stood before the congregation for judgment, until the death of him who is high priest at the time.
6. Then the manslayer may return to his own home, to the town from which he fled.
7. Kedesh, Shechem, Kiriath-arba, Bezer, Ramoth, and Golan were designated as cities of refuge for all of the people of Israel and sojourners.

JOSHUA 21: Allotments of cities and pastures to Levi
1. The Lord commanded through Moses to give the Levites cities and pasture to live in along with their livestock.
2. Lots were cast for the clans of the Levites, the descendants of Aaron, to receive 48 cities as the Lord had commanded through Moses.
3. Not one word of all the good promises that the Lord had made to the house of Israel had failed; all came to pass.

JOSHUA 22: The tribes from east of the Jordan return home
1. Joshua summoned the Reubenites, Gadites, and the half-tribe of Manasseh to instruct them to go to the lands east of the Jordan that Moses promised them.
2. They were faithful in keeping their promise to cross over the Jordan and fight alongside their brothers in taking the lands promised to the people of Israel.
3. Joshua commanded them to observe the commandment and the law the Lord commanded them through Moses.
4. Joshua blessed them and sent them on their way back across the Jordan.
5. But, they built an altar on the side of the Jordan belonging to the people of Israel (the other nine and one-half tribes).
6. The people of Israel gathered at Shiloh to make war against them because of this apparent breach of faith by the two and one-half tribes.
7. The two and one-half tribes denied accusations of rebellion and breach of faith, but instead claimed the altar was built in fear that their children may cease to worship the Lord.
8. The altar was built to be a “witness” between the two sides of the Jordan.
9. When this explanation was heard by the nine and one-half tribes, it was good in their eyes and war was averted.

JOSHUA 23: Joshua’s charge to the leaders of Israel
1. After much rest to Israel, Joshua, in his old age, promised the people of Israel that the Lord will push back the nations that remain in the land and drive them out.
2. Joshua commanded them to possess their land and to keep and do all that is written in the Book of the Law of Moses.
3. Joshua commanded them to not mix with the remaining nations among them or to mention their gods.
4. One man of you puts to flight a thousand, since it is the Lord your God who fights for you, just as he promised you.
5. The people of Israel were not to marry, associate with them, or worship their gods.
6. If so, the Lord will no longer drive out these nations before them; they will become a snare and a trap for the people of Israel.
7. And, the Lord will make the people of Israel perish quickly from the land he gave them.

JOSHUA 24: The renewal of the covenant at Shechem
1. Joshua summoned the leaders of Israel reminding them, the Lord took Abraham from beyond the Euphrates while they served other gods, bringing him through the land of Canaan and giving him many offspring.
2. Isaac had Jacob, who went down to Egypt and Esau, who went to the hill country of Seir.
3. The Lord sent Moses and Aaron to Egypt to ultimately bring the people of Israel back to the land of Canaan via the crossing of the Red Sea and the wilderness.
4. The Lord gave the Amorites, who lived on the far side of the Jordan, into the hands of the people of Israel to possess their land.
5. He also gave all peoples in the land into the hands of the people of Israel by sending “hornets” before them not by their sword or their bow.
6. Joshua told the people to therefore fear the Lord and serve him in sincerity and in faithfulness.
7. Joshua told them to put away all other gods and serve the Lord.
8. Joshua told them to choose who they will serve, the God of Israel or the other gods.
9. Joshua told them, “As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.”
10. The people of Israel said, “. . . we also will serve the Lord, for he is our God.”
10. Joshua again, told them the consequences of worshiping other gods and said that they are a witness unto themselves and he sent them away to their inheritance.
11. Joshua then died at 110 and was buried at his own inheritance at Timnath-serah in the hill country of Ephraim.

JUDGES 1: The conquest of Canaan continues
1. The people of Israel inquired of the Lord as to who will go up to meet the Canaanites, to fight.
2. The Lord said Judah should go up.
3. Judah and Simeon, his brother, agreed to go together to fight.
4. They defeated 10,000 of the Canaanites at Bezek.
5. Adoni-bezek fled, but they caught him and cut off his thumbs and big toes; they took him to Jerusalem where he died.
6. The men of Judah fought against Jerusalem and captured it setting it on fire.
7. Continuing to Debir via Hebron, Caleb said, “He who captures it, I will give him Achsah my daughter as wife.”
8. The conquest failed when battling the inhabitants of the plain because they had chariots of iron; likewise, at Jerusalem, the Jebusites could not be removed and they remained.
9. The Canaanites persisted in dwelling in the land because Manasseh could not drive them out; however, eventually they put them to forced labor.
10. Ephraim, Zebulun, Asher, Naphtali, and Dan did not drive out the inhabitants completely also, but eventually they used them under forced labor.

Week #34; Wed, 8/22/18: Judges 2-7

Week #34; Wed, 8/22/18: Judges 2:1-7:24

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
The term “angel of the Lord” speaks of Israel’s disobedience for not completing the total conquest of the land but promises not to break his covenant with them. The term “angel of the Lord” continues to speak with great authority; even as if it could be Jesus talking. Recall the many times this term has been used already (Gen. 16:7, etal).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
JUDGES 2: The Disobedience of Israel
1. The “angel of the Lord” speaks decisively to the people of Israel condemning them for not obeying his voice to totally drive out the inhabitants of the land.
2. He will now NOT drive out the inhabitants before them, but these inhabitants will now become a thorn in their sides; their gods will become a snare.
3. When Joshua died at age of 110 and was buried at Timnath-heres in Ephraim, the people continued to follow their elders who outlived Joshua until they were gathered to their fathers also.
4. The generations after them did not know the Lord or the work that he had done for Israel.
5. So, the people of Israel did what was evil in the sight of the Lord and began to serve Baals and their Ashtaroth idols, the gods of the inhabitants of the land–they abandoned the Lord.
6. The anger of the Lord was kindled against the people of Israel and he gave them up to their enemies.
7. In their distress, the Lord raised up judges, who saved them.
8. When each judge died, the people turned back and were more corrupt, going after other gods to worship.
9. Because of this, the Lord refused to drive out the nations that Joshua left behind.

JUDGES 3: The Lord Raises up Judges
1. The Lord used the nations (Philistines, Canaanites, Hittites, Amorites, Perizzites, Sidonians, Hivites, and Jebusites) that were allowed to remain in the land to test the people of Israel (those generations who had not experienced all the wars in Canaan) so that they would know war and learn war.
2. The people of Israel were to be tested by these nations to determine if the people would obey the commandment of the Lord.
3. The people of Israel intermarried with the people in the land and they served their gods.
4. Because this was evil in the sight of the Lord, the people of Israel were allowed to suffer at the hands of the nations in the land and they cried out to the Lord.
5. The people of Israel did evil; they forgot the Lord and served Baals and the Asheroth; they were sold to the king of Mesopotamia who they served for 8 years before crying out to the Lord; the Lord gave them victory and rest for 40 years under Othniel; and then Othniel died.
6. Again, the people of Israel did evil; they were defeated by Moab who they served for 18 years before crying out to the Lord; the Lord gave them victory and rest for 80 years under Ehud followed by Shamgar.

JUDGES 4: Deborah and Barak
1. But, the people of Israel did evil again; they were defeated by Canaan and served them for 20 years under persecution; the Lord heard them crying out; the Lord gave them victory over Canaan under Deborah.
2. Note the utility of a tent peg and a hammer by Jael, wife of Heber, to subdue Sisera (his 900 chariots were useless against the Lord).

JUDGES 5: The Song of Deborah and Barak
1. Following victory and great searching of hearts, the land had rest for 40 years.

JUDGES 6: Oppression from Midian
1. But, again the people of Israel did evil in sight of the Lord.
2. The Lord gave them into the hand of Midian for 7 years who plundered the land, leaving no sustenance in Israel.
3. The people cried out and the Lord sent the angel of the Lord to Gideon.
4. Gideon asked the angel of the Lord for a sign and it was given, so he built an altar to the Lord and tore down the altar of Baal that belonged to his father Joash.
5. All the Midianites, Amalekites, and all the people of the East came together to contend over the altar of Baal, but the Spirit the Lord brought up the Abiezrites, Manasseh, Asher, Zebulun, and Naphtali to Gideon.
6. Gideon asked God to show him a sign with a fleece of wool to confirm that he would be victorious against his enemies and he did, twice.

JUDGES 7: Gideon’s 300 men
1. Gideon (also Jerubbaal) and all his people rose up (about 32,000) and prepared to face the enemy at the hill of Moreh.
2. But the Lord said to Gideon that he had too many men telling him to reduce the size of his forces until only 300 were left; they were those who drew water to their mouth with their hands instead of lapping it with their tongue like a dog.
3. That night, Gideon and Purah, his servant, went to the camp of the enemy at the command of the Lord and listened to the enemy describe how one of them dreamed of their defeat by Gideon.
4. Gideon worshiped.
5. All of the enemy army ran and turned swords on his comrade when Gideon and his men surrounded them and blew trumpets, smashed jars, and lit torches.

Week #35; Wed, 8/29/18: Judges 8-13

Week #35; Wed, 8/29/18: Judges 8:1-13:25

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS: Gideon was a busy man. He displays humility to remove envy by the Ephraimites; he effectively used this method to end the strife. He no sooner has victory over the Midianites at the direction of God, he and God are soon forgotten.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
JUDGES 8. Gideon rules for forty years
1. The men of Ephraim were envious that Gideon did not call on them to fight against Midian.
2. Gideon wisely pacifies the Ephraimites with humility to prevent conflict.
3. Gideon was called of God; he did not seek honor or dispose of honor.
4. Gideon deferred to God for all honors and this divine conduct was recognized and accepted by the Ephraimites.
5. Gideon took his 300 men and crossed over the Jordan in pursuit of the remaining Midianites.
6. Gideon’s men were totally exhausted and needed sustenance; they turned to Succoth and Penuel seeking food but were denied.
7. Gideon pressed on with his 300 men to fight about 15,000 of the 120,000 remaining men of Midian and their two kings, leading the army to panic.
8. Gideon returned to Succoth and Penuel where he taught them a lesson by severely tormenting the elders of Succoth and killing the men of Penuel and destroying their tower.
9. Gideon killed the kings of Midian, Zebah and Zalmunna thereby sealing the victory over the Midianites.
10. Gideon was called by the men of Israel to “rule over us” but he said “I will not, the Lord will rule over you.”
11. But, Gideon called for all of the spoils from the battle with the Midianites to make an Ephod where all of Israel whored after it there, becoming a snare to him and his family.
12. Nevertheless, the land had rest for 40 years but when Gideon died the people whored after the Baals and did not remember the Lord.

CHAPTER 9: Gideon’s son Abimelech conspires to rule Shechem
1. Abimelech was one of 70 sons of Gideon and was bent on becoming ruler over the people.
2. Although his family was inclined to follow him, he hired ruthless people to kill his brothers.
3. Jotham, the youngest son, fled while the leaders of Shechem and Beth-millo and made Abimelech king.
4. Because of the violence done to the 70 sons of Gideon, Abimelech only reigned for 3 years; he died in battle when a woman threw a rock from the tower of Thebez and crushed his head that led to being finished by his armor bearer with the sword.
5. God returned the evil of Abimelech which he committed against his father when he killed his seventy brothers.

CHAPTER 10: More disobedience, oppression and deliverance
1. After Abimelech there arose Tola and Puah, who ruled for 23 and 22 years respectively.
2. Then the people of Israel did what was evil in the sight of the Lord and served the Baals and the Ashtaroth, the gods of Syria, Sidon, Moab, Ammonites, Philistines; they forsook the Lord and did not serve him.
3. The people of Israel were sold into the hands of the Philistines and Ammonites where they were oppressed for 18 years.
4. When the people of Israel cried out to the Lord in repentance, he said I will save you no more.
5. The people put away the foreign gods and called for a man to fight against the Ammonites and giving him head over them if victorious.

CHAPTER 11: Jephthah delivers Israel
1. Upon confrontation by the Ammonites against Israel, Jephthah was sought out by the elders of Gilead to be their leader for he was a mighty warrior.
2. Even after being rejected by his brothers as the leader of Gilead, the people were in distress and promised to make him their leader if he was successful; Jephthah agreed.
3. Jephthah learned that the Ammonites wanted their land restored because it was taken when the people of Israel came up out of Israel.
4. Jephthah vowed to the Lord that if he was victorious over the Ammonites, he would offer up whatever comes out from the doors of his house to meet him when he returned in peace from the Ammonites, “I will offer it up for a burnt offering.”
5. So, the Lord gave the Ammonites over to the people of Israel.
6. Upon returning to his home, Jephthah’s daughter came out to meet him with tambourines and dance.
7. Jephthah became very low for she was his only child.
8. His daughter only asked for two months to weep with her friends.
9. At the end of two months, Jephthah did with her according to his vow with the Lord.

CHAPTER 12: Ephraimites object being left out of conflict again
1. Shibboleth is a difficult word to pronounce and it was used to test the Ephraimites to see if they were opponents; 42,000 failed the test at the fords of the Jordan.
2. Jephthah judged Israel 6 years, then he died and was buried in Gilead.
3. Later, Iban ruled for 7 years, Elon ruled for 10 years, and Abdon ruled for 8 years.

CHAPTER 13: Birth of Samson
1. But, the people of Israel again did evil in the sight of the Lord, so he gave them into the hands of the Philistines for 40 years.
2. Manoah’s wife was barren and she was visited by the angel of the Lord who told her she was to have a son that would begin to save Israel from the Philistines; she was to drink no wine or strong drink and eat only clean food.
3. No razor was to come upon his head; he was a Nazirite to God.
4. The angel of the Lord returned later upon the request of Manoah and his wife; he restated what he told Manoah’s wife and he indicated to them to prepare a burnt offering to the Lord.
5. The angel of the Lord went up in the flame of the altar; they saw him no more.
6. Their son was named Sampson when he was born; the Lord blessed him and the Spirit of the Lord began to stir him.

NOTE: After studying 20% of the Bible to this point, it appears that walking through the complete Bible from cover to cover provides a comprehensive understanding of God’s plan that is not readily available from random studies of separate books.

Week #36; Wed, 9/05/18: Judges 14-19

Week #36; Wed, 9/05/18: Judges 14:1-19:30

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS: Samson began to grow and was moved by the Spirit of the Lord. He felt the power of the Spirit when he killed a lion by hand. The Spirit of the Lord also led Samson to do the will of God against the oppression of the Philistines.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
JUDGES 14. Samson marries a Philistine woman.
1. Samson appealed to his parents to “get” the Philistine woman he saw at Timnah for him to marry, but they discouraged him by questioning if he wouldn’t be better off with a woman from the circumcised.
2. Samson would not be deterred; he was acting on direction from the Lord to gain an opportunity against the Philistines who ruled over Israel at the time.
3. While going to get the woman at Timnah with his parents, a lion approached Samson and he killed it by hand unbeknownst to his parents.
4. Upon reaching the woman at Timnah, Samson found her to be “right in his eyes.”
5. Later, when Samson returned to get her, he observed the carcass of the lion and it was filled with bees and honey.
6. Samson ate and took some to his father and mother.
7. Samson prepared a feast when his father went down to the woman with onlookers nearby.
8. Samson put out a riddle and promised if they could solve it, he would give 30 changes of clothes; however, if they could not solve it, they would give him the same.
9. The Philistines could not solve the riddle, so they used Samson’s wife to entice him and learn the riddle for them.
10. When Samson’s wife learned the riddle, she told the Philistines and they gave Samson the meaning of his riddle.
11. The Spirit of the Lord came upon Samson leading him to kill 30 men in the city of Ashkelon.
12. Samson returned and gave the spoils of garments to those that spoke his riddle; her father gave his wife to his companion at his wedding.

JUDGES 15: Samson Defeats the Philistines
1. In Samson’s rage, he caught 300 foxes and tied their tails together, lighting the tails, and releasing them into the standing grain.
2. Samson also destroyed the stacked grain and the olive orchards of the Philistines.
3. In turn, the Philistines destroyed Samson’s wife and her father with fire.
4. Samson struck down the Philistines and went to a “cleft of the rock of Elam” to stay.
5. But the Philistines raided Lehi in Judah saying, “we have come to bind up Samson to do to him what he has done to us.”
6. 3,000 men of Judah went to Samson to bind him and turn him over to the Philistines thinking it would call off the Philistines.
7. As Samson was turned over to the Philistines, the Spirit of the Lord came over him and he took the jaw bone of a donkey and killed 1,000 men at Ramath-lehi.
8. Upon being restored by the Lord with water from a hollow place at En-hakkore, Samson judged Israel for 20 years in the days of the Philistines.

CHAPTER 16: Sampson and Delilah
1. Samson’s strength was on display in Gaza where he tore down the gates of the city including the posts and bar, putting them on his shoulders and setting them on a hill in front of Hebron.
2. Later, Delilah of Sorek, Samson’s lover, was approached by the Lords of the Philistines to have her learn of Samson’s great strength.
3. Delilah complied with the Lords of the Philistines who bribed her with 1,100 pieces of silver from each of them.
4. So Delilah said to Sampson, “Please tell me where your great strength lies and how you can be subdued.”
5. Three times Delilah had men lying in wait for her to bind up Sampson to no avail; each time Sampson broke the bindings of bowstrings, ropes, and seven locks of his hair.
6. Delilah pressed him day after day for Sampson to tell her the secret to his strength and finally he told her if his head was shaved, he would become weak and like any other man.
7. The Lord left him when his head was shaved and the Philistines gouged out his eyes and bound him taking him to Gaza to grind at the mill in the prison.
8. The Philistines offered a great sacrifice to Dagon their god with much joy for the capture of Sampson; they made him entertain them by standing between the pillars of the house where they were gathered.
9. Several thousand were being entertained in the house and on the roof by Samson when he cried out to the Lord for his strength to return to avenge the Philistines.
10. He bowed with all his strength, and the house fell, killing more than those whom he had killed during his life; Samson also died with the Philistines.
11. He was buried at Manoah with his father; he had judged Israel for 20 years.

CHAPTER 17: Micah and the carved image
1. Micah gave his mother back 1,100 pieces of silver that was taken from her and she gave him 200 pieces for the silversmith to make it into a carved image and a metal image.
2. Because there was no judge in Israel at that time, everyone did what was right in his own eyes.
3. A Levite from Bethlehem in Judah was sojourning and he met Micah where he was ask to stay with Micah and become his priest for ten pieces of silver a year and clothing.
4. But, Micah ordained the Levite thinking he would prosper because of it.

CHAPTER 18: The Danites take the Levite and the idol from Micah
1. Still, there was no king in Israel and the Danites were seeking an inheritance for itself to dwell in; no inheritance had fallen to them among the tribes of Israel.
2. So five men from Dan were sent to spy out the land where they arrived at the house of Micah.
3. The men of Dan overheard the voice of the Levite and asked him why he was there; when they learned the Levite was the hired priest of Micah, they asked him to inquire of God so they would know if they would have a successful journey.
4. The Levite told them to go in peace; their journey was under the eye of the Lord.
5. The five men completed spying out the land and returned and reported that the land is very good, a place where there is no lack of anything that is in the earth.
6. 600 men of Dan armed for battle traveling to Ephraim where they arrived at the house of Micah.
7. The 5 scouts that were with the men of Dan told the rest that the house of Micah contained an ephod, household gods, a carved image, and a metal image.
8. The 600 men of Dan took the ephod, household gods, carved image, and a metal image along with the Levite and left the house of Micah.
9. They went to Laish and struck the people there with the sword and burned the city.
10. The Danites rebuilt the city and lived there, renaming the city Dan.
11. But, the Danites set up the carved image for themselves, and Jonathan, the son of Gershom, son of Moses, and his sons were priests to the tribe of the Danites until the captivity of the land.

CHAPTER 19: A Levite and his concubine
1. A certain Levite sojourning in Ephraim, took a concubine from Bethlehem in Judah, but she was unfaithful to him and she fled to her father’s house at Bethlehem.
2. The Levite went after her; at the girl’s house, her father welcomed him and urged him to stay.
3. The Levite, his concubine, his servant, and his donkeys stayed until the 5th day before departing and stopping at Gibeah that belonged to Benjamine.
4. Stopping in the open square of the city, an old man urged them to go to his home for the night where he had plenty of room and no lack of anything.
5. As they rested, worthless men of the city surrounded the house, beating on the door demanding the Levite man come out to them.
6. The old man intervened for the Levite because he knew the men outside were dishonorable and were filled with bad intentions.
7. Then the man seized his concubine, led her out to the men, only to find her in the morning motionless at the threshold of the door.
8. The man took his concubine home and divided her body into twelve pieces and sent them throughout all the territory of Israel.

Week #37; Wed, 9/12/18: Judges 20-Ruth 4

Week #37; Wed, 9/12/18: Judges 20:01-Ruth 4:22

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS: 400,000 men on foot that drew the sword came together as one from the tribes of Israel against the tribe of Benjamin over the evil done by the “worthless fellows” at Gibeah, a possession of Benjamin. In Ruth we see how this book records part of the life line and linage of Christ and became Cannon with the other 65 books of the Bible.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
JUDGES 20: Internal war in Israel against the tribe of Benjamin
1. Israel goes to war with Benjamin with outrage over the abomination done by the leaders in Gibeah to the Levite and his concubine.
2. The abomination by the leaders in Gibeah resulted in 400,000 men of war being gathered up from Israel saying, “None of us will go to his tent, and none of us will return to his house.”
3. The men of Israel said, “We will go up against Gibeah of Benjamin by lot, taking 10 men of 100 throughout the tribes of Israel; 100 of 1,000 and 1,000 of 10,000 will bring provisions for the people.”
4. The tribes of Israel sent messengers through all the tribe of Benjamin demanding that they give up the worthless fellows in Gibeah that they may be put to death and purge evil from Israel.
5. The Benjaminites would not turn over the evil men of Gibeah and they came out of their cities to Gibeah with 26,000 men to do battle against the people of Israel.
6. 700 men also came out of Gibeah to join the men of Benjamin; they were all left handed and could sling a stone at a hair and not miss.
7. The men of Israel went up to Bethel to seek guidance from God who shall go up first to fight Benjamin; Judah was chosen by God to go up first.
8. Over 3 days of battle, Israel lost 30,030 men even though they were sent up by God; however, on the third day, the men of Israel set up an ambush with all of their men of war and defeated Benjamin’s 25,600 men.
9. All men (and women as described below) and beasts, were destroyed; the towns of Benjamin were set on fire.

JUDGES 21: Remaining Survivors of Benjamin lack wives
1. One tribe of Israel could now potentially be cut off since the survivors of Benjamin had no wives.
2. After offering up a burnt offering and a peace offering, the people of Israel searched for any that did not come up in the assembly to the Lord at Mizpah.
3. Jabesh-gilead did not come to the assembly at Mizpah to go against Benjamin so they were all put to death (except 400 virgins) by 12,000 men of the people of Israel.
4. Upon making peace with the remaining Benjaminite’s at Rimmon; the people of Israel gave them the 400 women whom they saved alive of the women of Jabesh-gilead.
5. However, the 400 virgins were not enough for the surviving Benjaminites, but no more were available because of the oath the people of Israel took not to provide wives to Benjamin.
6. So, at a yearly feast of the Lord at Shiloh, the surviving Benjaminites were told by the elders of the congregation to go and lie in ambush to snatch one of the daughters of Shiloh that comes out to dance.
7. The men of Benjamin did so and returned to their inheritance to rebuild the towns and live in them; the people of Israel also departed to their inheritance.

RUTH 1: Naomi becomes widowed
1. A famine came in the days of Judges making a man of Bethlehem named Elimelech take his family to search for food in Moab.
2. Elimelech’s wife was Naomi; his two sons were Mahlon and Chilion.
3. When Elimelech died in Moab, his sons took Moabite wives named Orpah and Ruth, but the sons also died leaving their wives with Naomi.
4. Upon discovering that food was available in Judah, Naomi set out to return home, but Orpah declined yet Ruth remained with Naomi.
5. Ruth embraced Naomi and the God of Israel; they set out for Bethlehem arriving at the beginning of wheat and barley harvest.

RUTH 2: Boaz, a relative of Elimelech
1. Naomi’s husband was a relative of a worthy man named Boaz, who owned part of a barley field that was being gleaned.
2. Ruth set out to glean after the reapers where she came upon Boaz’s field.
3. Boaz told Ruth to glean in his field only and to follow his reapers while telling his young men not to touch her and provide her with drink.
4. Ruth asked Boaz why he was so generous to her and he replied that he was aware of her plight while remaining loyal to Naomi.
5. Boaz was generous to Ruth and protected her saying you have chosen to come under the wings of the Lord, God of Israel even as a foreigner.
6. Ruth returned to Naomi and told her about Boaz and his kindness and generosity.
7. Naomi told Ruth that Boaz is a close relative, one of our redeemers.
NOTE: This is a key link to the blood line of Christ and the basis for the book of Ruth being placed in the Cannon.

RUTH 3: The threshing floor
1. Naomi sent Ruth to Boaz one evening at the threshing floor where he was winnowing barley so he could tell her what to do regarding his role as a redeemer.
2. Ruth presented herself to Boaz as a woman desiring to be his servant.
3. Boaz informed Ruth she was a worthy woman and that although he was a redeemer, there was one who is a redeemer nearer than him.
4. Boaz told Ruth if the nearest redeemer would not redeem her, he would redeem her.
5. Boaz told Ruth to tell no one that she had visited him at the threshing floor during the evening hours; he gave her 6 measures of barley to take with her as she departed before daylight.
6. When Ruth told Naomi the outcome of her visit to Boaz, she told Ruth to be patient for now knowing that Boaz would settle the matter with the first redeemer that day.

RUTH 4: Boaz redeems Ruth and they marry
1. Boaz meets the first redeemer at the gate where he took 10 elders of the city indicating to them that Naomi is selling a parcel of land (including Ruth, the Moabite) that belonged to Elimelech.
2. Upon hearing that the parcel of land up for redemption included Ruth, the first redeemer decline his rights and deferred his rights to Boaz.
3. So, Boaz claimed his right to Naomi’s parcel of land, including Ruth, and the matter was attested to by the elders.
4. Then Boaz took Ruth as his wife and a son was born to perpetuate the linage of Elimelech in Israel.
5. Naomi became a nurse to their son for all of her remaining days in Israel.

Week #38; Wed, 9/19/18: 1 Samuel 1-8

Week #38; Wed, 9/19/18: 1 Samuel 1:1-8:22

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. It is striking that Elkanah, a devout Levite, had two wives in contrast to only one wife (Matt. 19:5, 8).
2. However, the conflict between the two wives led to a special outcome, the birth and dedication of Samuel, the prophet.
3. Samuel was given the role of anointing the first two kings over Israel, Saul and David.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 SAMUEL 1: Samuel’s birth
1. Elkanah’s wives were very different; Peninnah had children, but Hannah had no children until later.
2. Hannah prayed for a son, promising to dedicate him to the Lord.
3. When Hannah delivered Samuel, she gave him to the Lord to serve all the days of his life.
4. Elkanah maintained his devotion to the Lord and he strongly supported Hannah.

1 SAMUEL 2: Hannah’s prayer of praise, thanksgiving, and rejoicing
1. Hannah’s powerful prayer praises God’s triumph; wisdom and sovereignty of divine providence of the affairs of people; and prediction and advance of his friends and demise of all his enemies.
2. At the tabernacle where Elkanah worshiped with his family in Shiloh, Eli was the priest; however, his two sons performed service there too, but with contempt of the Lord.
3. Meanwhile, Samuel grew under the presence of Eli in the tabernacle.
4. There came a “man of God” to Eli and said, both of your sons, Hophni and Phinehas, shall die on the same day and I will put in place a faithful priest that will do according to what is in my heart and in my mind forever.

1 SAMUEL 3: The Lord calls Samuel to minister
1. While Samuel was ministering to the Lord under Eli, he was lying down where the ark of God was placed.
2. The Lord called Samuel three times, each time he ran to Eli prepared to answer and support his need.
3. Eli told Samuel he did not call him and to return to his rest; however, at the last call Eli perceived the call to Samuel was from the Lord and to respond to the Lord by saying, “Speak, Lord, for your servant hears.”
4. The Lord came and stood, calling as before, “Samuel, Samuel, behold, I am about to do a thing in Israel at which the two ears of everyone who hears it will tingle. On that day I will fulfill against Eli all that I have spoken concerning his house, from beginning to end. And I declare to him that I am about to punish his house forever, for the iniquity that he knew, because his sons were blaspheming God, and he did not restrain them. Therefore, I swear to the house of Eli that the iniquity of Eli’s house shall not be atoned for by sacrifice or offering forever.”
5. The next morning Eli told Samuel to tell him what the Lord said; Samuel told him everything the Lord said.
6. All people came to know that Samuel was established as a prophet of the Lord; the Lord revealed himself to Samuel again at Shiloh.

1 SAMUEL 4: The ark of the covenant is captured by the Philistines
1. When Israel went out to battle against the Philistines at Ebenezer, they were defeated losing about 4,000 men.
2. The elders determined that they should bring the ark of the covenant of the Lord to Shiloh that it may save them.
3. All of Israel gave a mighty shout as soon as the ark came into the camp and striking fear into the Philistine camp.
4. In battle; however, the Philistines defeated Israel striking down 30,000 foot soldiers, capturing the ark of God, and killing Eli’s sons, Hophni and Phinehas.
5. When the news reached Shiloh, Eli was informed of the losses and he fell backwards, breaking his neck; Eli had been judge over Israel for 40 years.

1 SAMUEL 5: The ark and the Philistines
1. The Philistines placed the ark in Ashdod in the house of Dagon; however, the next day Dagon had fallen face down on the ground before the ark of the Lord.
2. When the Philistines restored Dagon to its place, the same thing happened only the head and hands were cut off.
3. Ashdod was plagued by tumors and the lords of the Philistines decided that the ark of God should be sent to Gath, but the people there experienced tumors too.
4. The ark of God was then sent to Ekron, but tumors struck them too.
5. In panic, the lords of the Philistines sent the ark of God away after a total of 7 months.

1 SAMUEL 6: The ark of God is returned to Israel
1. The Philistine priests insisted on returning the ark of God to Israel with a guilt offering of 5 golden tumors and 5 golden mice so that they would be healed (1 for Ashdod, 1 for Gaza, 1 for Ashkelon, 1 for Gath, and 1 for Ekron).
2. A new cart was prepared with two milk cows that had never been yoked.
3. The ark of God and the golden figures were loaded on the cart and released.
4. The cows went straight in the direction of Beth-shemesh, turning neither to the right or the left; the cart stopped in the field of Joshua of Beth-shemesh amid cheers and rejoicing.
5. The cows were offered as a burnt offering.
6. 70 men of Beth-shemesh were struck down because they looked upon the ark of the Lord.

1 SAMUEL 7: Samuel judges Israel
1. The ark of God was taken to the house of Abinadab and they consecrated his son Eleazar to have charge of the ark.
2. Samuel told Israel to put away their foreign gods and Ashtaroth and to serve the Lord only so that He will deliver them from the Philistines; the people of Israel did as Samuel told them.
3. Samuel told the house of Israel to gather at Mizpah for prayer and fasting for sinning against the Lord.
4. The Philistines heard of the gathering and they went up against Israel.
5. Samuel offered up a lamb as an offering and as the Philistines drew near, the Lord thundered with a mighty sound against the Philistines and threw them into confusion and they were routed before Israel.
6. So the Philistines were subdued and did not again enter the territory of Israel.

1 SAMUEL 8: Israel demands a king
1. When Samuel became old, he made his sons judges over Israel, but they took bribes for gain and perverted justice.
2. The elders of Israel gathered together and came to Samuel at Ramah saying, “You are old and your sons do not walk in your ways; now appoint for us a king to judge us like all the nations.”
3. Samuel was displeased and appealed to the Lord in prayer, but the Lord said, “Obey the voice of the people for they have not rejected you, for they have rejected me from being their king.”
4. The Lord told Samuel to warn them and show them the ways of the king who shall reign over them.
5. Samuel did so, but the people refused to obey the voice of Samuel thinking that a king will go out and fight their battles.
6. The Lord granted Israel’s request for a king saying, “Obey their voice and make them a king.

Week #39; Wed, 9/26/18: 1 Samuel 9-14

Week #39; Wed, 9/26/18: 1 Samuel 9:1-14:32

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. God’s direction to Samuel to anoint Saul and David overlaps their lifespans; tension had to follow.
2. In desperation under the threat of the Philistines, Saul unlawfully offered the burnt offering instead of Samuel thereby dooming his kingdom.
3. Jonathan, Saul’s son, acted out of faith.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 SAMUEL 9: King Saul led to Samuel
1. At the direction of Kish, a wealthy man, Saul and his servant were sent to search for some of his lost donkeys. Q: WHAT COMPELLED THE DONKEYS TO BECOME LOST? A: THE HAND OF GOD MOVES IN MYSTERIOUS WAYS . . .
2. For a quarter of a shekel of silver, Saul’s servant offered it to Samuel as a gift when they came seeking directions from the “man of God.”
3. Prior to Saul’s arrival, God told Samuel he was coming and he was to anoint him as prince over His people Israel.
4. Saul was invited to eat with Samuel as the honored guest at the feast of sacrifice; he was served a special portion that had been reserved for him.

1 SAMUEL 10: Samuel anoints Saul king
1. Samuel used a flask of oil, a kiss, and prophesy to Saul at his private anointing.
2. A series of steps over seven days then started which led Saul to become “another man” by the Spirit of the Lord.
3. Saul then prophesied among a group of prophets and they proclaimed “Is Saul also among the prophets?”
4. Samuel called the people together to the Lord at Mizpah where lots were drawn and the tribe of Benjamin was selected and the clan of the Matrites was selected and Saul was selected out of them.
5. Samuel then said to all the people, “Do you see him whom the Lord has chosen?” and the people said, “Long live the king!”

1 SAMUEL 11: Ammonites defeated
1. When the Ammonites threatened to gouge out the right eye of the people of Jabesh-gilead in condition for a peace treaty, Saul mustered 330,000 as one man to come out against them.
2. Upon victory over the Ammonites, Samuel said to the people, “Come, let us go to Gilgal and there renew the kingdom.”
3. There they made Saul king before the Lord in Gilgal.

1 SAMUEL 12: Samuel’s farewell
1. Samuel spoke to all Israel as he grew old, about his displeasure for the failings of the people in the distant past to the present for not following the Lord.
2. So, now he said, “. . . if you and the king who reigns over you will follow the Lord your God, it will be well. But if you will not obey the voice of the Lord, but rebel against the commandment of the Lord, then the hand of the Lord will be against you and your king.”
3. As a confirmation, Samuel said before the people as he called on the Lord to send a “great thing” through thunder and rain, a testament to their wickedness for asking for a king; the Lord sent thunder and rain that day.
4. The people asked Samuel to pray for them for asking for a king; he said he would pray continuously for them and he cautioned them to not “. . . turn aside after empty things that cannot profit or deliver, for they are empty. But if you still do wickedly, you shall be swept away, both you and your king.”

1 SAMUEL 13: Philistines advance for war
1. When Jonathan defeated the Philistine garrison at Geba, the Philistines made a “stench” toward Israel and assembled 30,000 chariots and 6,000 horsemen and troops to fight.
2. When the people of Israel learned of the advance of the Philistines, they fled and hid; meanwhile, Saul was waiting seven days for Samuel to return, but he did not arrive at the appointed time.
3. Saul himself UNLAWFULLY offered the burnt offering instead of Samuel.
4. When Samuel arrived, he asked Saul, “What have you done?”
5. Saul confessed that he needed to seek the favor of the Lord before confronting the Philistines; however, since Samuel was not present to offer up the burnt offering, he offered up the burn offering himself.
6. Samuel told Saul, “You have done foolishly! You have not kept the command the Lord your God, with which he commanded you. For then the Lord would have established your kingdom over Israel forever. But now your kingdom shall not continue. The Lord has sought out a man ‘after his own heart, and the Lord has commanded him to be prince over his people, because you have not kept what the Lord commanded you.”
7. Only 600 men possessed sword and spear under Jonathan to meet the Philistines.

1 SAMUEL 14: Philistines defeated
1. Jonathan took only his armor-bearer out to meet the Philistines saying to him, “Come, let us go over to the garrison of these uncircumcised. It may be that the Lord will work for us, for nothing can hinder the Lord from saving by many or by few.”
2. The Philistines fell before Jonathan and his armor-bearer; 22 men fell in the first strike; however, a panic began in the camp when the earth quaked causing the Philistines to disburse.
3. When Saul rallied the men with him and went into the battle, they learned that every Philistine’s sword was against his fellow, and there was great confusion.
4. All of the people of Israel then rallied and pursued the enemy; so the Lord saved Israel that day.

Week #40; Wed, 10/03/18: 1 Samuel 15-19

Week #40; Wed, 10/03/18: 1 Samuel 15:1-19:24

PERSONAL OBSERVATIOINS:

1. The Lord exacts harsh judgment over details regarding completion of His commandments.
2. Lack of attention to details can be costly if not performed in accordance with the word of the Lord.
3. The linage of Christ is clear as it can be as the kingdom moves forward.
4. The Lord upholds those that come in His name, even while facing giants.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

1 SAMUEL 15: Saul rejected
1. When the Lord instructed Samuel to inform Saul to defeat the Amalekites, Saul did so; but, he did not totally destroy everything that God commanded him.
2. The Lord said to Samuel, “I regret that I have made Saul king, for he has turned back from following me and has not performed my commandments.”
3. Saul even built a monument for himself in Carmel thinking he had performed his mission successfully.
4. However, Saul overlooked the fact that the Lord considered Saul’s omissions as rebellion, presumption, and rejection of the word of the Lord. 5. Samuel informs Saul that the Lord has rejected him from being king because he rejected the word of the Lord.
6. Saul confessed to Samuel that he sinned through transgression of the Lord’s word because he feared the people and obeyed their voice.
7. Even when Saul asked for pardon, he was rejected by Samuel and not seen again until the day of his death.

1 SAMUEL 16: David anointed
1. The Lord told Samuel to fill his horn with oil, to take a heifer for sacrifice, and go to Jesse in Bethlehem for “I have provided for myself a king among his sons.”
2. Samuel was told to pass by all of Jesse’s sons until only David was left but was not present at the sacrifice since he was attending to the sheep.
3. When David was brought up to Samuel and Jesse, he was anointed as king and given the Spirit of the Lord for the Lord looked into his heart and it was right.
4. The Spirit of the Lord also departed from Saul and he was given a harmful spirit to torment him.
5. Saul’s servants sought out a skillful player of the lyre to soothe him when he was in torment; David was selected and he also became Saul’s armor bearer.
6. When David played for Saul, it gave Saul relief from the harmful spirit.

1 SAMUEL 17: Goliath, the giant Philistine
1. When the Philistines gathered for battle against Israel, Saul gathered his army in the Valley of Elah where they met on line.
2. Out of the camp of the Philistines came a mighty giant warrior named Goliath of Gath who daily challenged the men of Israel to send out a man to fight to the death to determine a winner between them and a winner for the overall opponents.
3. After 40 days of this challenge, David heard Goliath’s battle cry and asked, “What shall be done for the man who kills the Philistine and takes away the reproach from Israel?”
4. The king had pledged to enrich the man who kills Goliath with great riches, give him his daughter, and make his father’s house free in Israel.
5. David convinced Saul to let him fight Goliath by stating that he had killed lions and bears while attending sheep; David did not even accept Saul’s armor.
6. David took his staff, 5 smooth stones, his sling, and a shield bearer as he went out to face Goliath.
7. Goliath cursed David by his gods and showed him disdain while David told him, “I come in the name of the Lord of hosts, the God of the armies of Israel whom you have defiled.”
8. Goliath was felled by a rock from David’s sling and David cut off Goliath’s head using Goliath’s own sword; the Philistines fled at the fall of their champion.
9. Saul brought David to him to inquire about his father while David was still holding the head of Goliath.
10. David put Goliath’s armor in his tent.

1 SAMUEL 18: Friendship between David and Jonathan
1. Jonathan and David’s soul were knit together in a covenant.
2. Jonathan gave David his own robe and his armor.
3. David became successful in war wherever Saul sent him, so Saul set him over the men of war.
4. David was good in the sight of the people.
5. Saul became jealous of David when he heard the songs of the women when returning from war–“Saul has struck down his thousands, and David his ten thousands.”
6. Saul eyed David from that day on thinking of what Samuel said about his kingdom.
7. The next day the harmful spirit entered Saul, and while David was playing his lyre, Saul hurled his spear at David but he evaded it twice.
8. Saul knew that the Lord was with David, so he removed David from his presence and made him commander of a thousand.
9. David also married Saul’s daughter Michal and not Merab who should have been given to him.

1 SAMUEL 19: Saul attempts to kill David
1. Saul sought his son, Jonathan, and his servants to kill David, but Jonathan told David of his fathers intent.
2. Jonathan sought Saul’s intent directly and Saul relented promising not to kill David.
3. Jonathan brought David to Saul and he was in his presence as before; however, there was war again with the Philistines dictating David go out and fight them.
4. A harmful spirit came upon Saul when David returned home from war and he again turned his spear on David to kill him.
5. But, David’s wife, Michal encouraged David to escape and she let him down through a window so he could flee and escape; Michal told Saul’s servants that David was sick in bed when they came to take him to Saul.
6. Saul sent messengers to Ramah three times and each group failed to recover David, so he went to Ramah himself; he also failed to recover David and he began to prophesy like the three groups he sent.

Week #41; Wed, 10/10/18: 1 Samuel 20-25

Week #41; Wed, 10/10/18: 1 Samuel 20:1-25:44

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. David is on the run from Saul.
2. When David spared Saul’s life, he ceased pursuing David.
3. David loses his wife but gains a new one in a way that can only be attributed to the hand of God.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Samuel 20: Jonathan’s Warning to David
1. David feared his life would be taken by Saul and he was in hiding.
2. Jonathan assured David that his father always disclosed his intentions to him.
3. Jonathan made a covenant with David to inform him of his father’s intention upon the coming of the new moon.
4. Jonathan promised to shoot three arrows to signal to David his father’s intent, safety or danger in returning to Saul.
5. At the feast of the new moon, David’s place at the king’s table was empty and Saul inquired as to his whereabouts.
6. Jonathan told Saul that David went to Bethlehem to be with his family for the feast; this angered Saul and he promised to put David to death.
7. Later, Jonathan signaled to David with his arrows that his father’s intent was to do harm to David.
8. David and Jonathan departed in separate ways carrying much grief.

1 Samuel 21: David flees alone to Nob to Ahimelech the priest
1. David asked Ahimelech, “What do you have on hand to eat?”
2. Ahimelech gave him the holy bread for there was no common bread on hand.
3. David also asked for weapons; however, Ahimelech only had the sword of Goliath that David took from him in the battle at the Valley of Elah.
4. David took Goliath’s sword and fled to Gath to Achish the king of Gath, but the local people recognized him.
5. So, David feared Achish and he changed his behavior pretending to be mentally disturbed making Achish think he was mad.

1 Samuel 22: The Cave of Adullam
1. David departed from Nob and escaped to the cave of Adullam where his whole family and about 400 others went down to him at the news.
2. David became captain over all of them and they went down to Mizpeh of Moab and appealed to the king to let them stay with them.
3. The Lord spoke through the prophet Gad telling David to go to the forest of Hereth in Judah.
4. Doeg, the Edomite, informed Saul all that David had done at Nob and he sent for Ahimelech, the priest, and the priests who were at Nob.
5. Saul put Ahimelech and 85 others to death along with all of the people of Nob, except for one, Abiathar, the son of Ahimelech.
6. Abiathar went to David and informed him what Doeg told Saul and what Saul did to Nob.

1 Samuel 23: Philistines attack Keilah
1. The Philistines were robbing the threshing floors at the city of Keilah, so David inquired of the Lord to attack them.
2. The Lord told David to attack the Philistines at Keilah; David and his men were victorious.
3. Saul plotted to kill David at Keilah, a city with gates and iron bars.
4. David summoned the ephod that Abiathar, the priest, carried and he said to the Lord, “Will the people of Keilah surrender me to Saul?”
5. The Lord said, “Yes.”
6. David and his 600 men departed from Keilah and went to the strongholds of the wilderness of Ziph at Horesh while being pursued by Saul.
7. Jonathan went to David and they made a covenant together agreeing that David would be king over Israel and that they would be rejoined in the reign of David while they also confirmed that Saul knows this.
8. Meanwhile, the Ziphites disclosed David’s location to Saul and they led him to the wilderness of Maon in Arabah; but, in the pursuit of David, Saul learned that the Philistines were attacking the land.

1 Samuel 24: David spares Saul from sure death
1. Following the subduing of the Philistines, Saul took 3,000 of his men to resume his hunt for David.
2. While in route to capture David, Saul entered a cave at Engedi to find relief, the same cave where David and his men were hiding.
3. David stealthily cut off the corner of Saul’s robe there in the cave.
4. Later, David followed Saul and called after him saying, “My lord, the king!” and showed Saul the corner of his robe exclaiming that even though the Lord delivered Saul into his hand, he did not harm him.
5. Saul wept and confessed to David that he is more righteous and that he would become King of Israel.
6. Saul and David departed.

1 Samuel 25: Death of Samuel
1. When Samuel died they buried him in his house at Ramah.
2. David departed to Maon in the wilderness of Paran where he met Nabal and Abigail who were very rich.
3. Nabal was shearing sheep in Carmel and David sent his men to seek whatever he had for a feast day.
4. Nabal rejected David’s men and greatly insulted them.
5. David’s men had been guarding Nabal’s possessions while he was in Carmel shearing his many sheep.
6. David was indignant that Nabal did not do good for good and he ordered his men to draw their sword against Nabal.
7. Abigail interceded offering David’s men the prepared feast for Nabal’s men while she pleaded for David not to harm Nabal.
8. David relented and praised Abigail for keeping him from bloodguilt.
9. When Abigail told Nabal about the feast for David and his men, he became like a stone and later died.
10. Saul had given Michal, David’s wife and his daughter, to Palti of Gallim so David sent his servants to Abigail to seek her for his wife and she agreed.

Week #42; Wed, 10/17/18: 1 Samuel 26-2 Samuel 2

Week #42; Wed, 10/17/18: 1 Samuel 26:1–2 Samuel 2:32

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. David and Saul struggle again and again over a centralized state for the company of tribes.
2. David and Saul see more pressure from the Philistines, but David flees to them at a critical time.
3. Yahweh plays a central part in the governing of Israel and the transformation into a centralized state–to keep moving forward.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Samuel 26: Collision course for Saul and David
1. A confrontation over power by Saul and David must be resolved.
2. Saul is the stalker and David is the stalked that must always escape.
3. But, the Lord arose during Saul’s pursuit of David at the wilderness of Ziph putting a deep sleep over Saul and his 3,000 men enabling David and Abishai to take Saul’s spear and water jag.
4. From a safe distance, David calls out to Abner to explain why he did not properly guard Saul, the Lord’s anointed.
5. David displayed Saul’s spear and water jar that was at his head to prove that Saul had been at great risk; he returned it to Saul.
6. David yelled to Saul, “What have I done, why do you come out seeking a single flea?”
7. Saul admitted, “I have sinned. Return for I will do no more harm to you.”
8. However, they departed from the place by separate way.
1 Samuel 27: David seeks shelter from the Philistines
1. David knows that Saul will continue to pursue him, so he escapes to the land of the Philistines, out of the land of Israel.
2. David and his 600 men and their families fled to Gath and Saul no longer sought him.
3. David said to Achish, king of Gath, “Give me a place in one of the country towns to dwell.”
4. Achish agreed and gave David and his men Ziklag; they lived there for 16 months.
5. David and his men raided and plundered the towns in the greater area leaving no survivors to bring news to Gath.
6. When Achish asked, “Where have you been raiding?” David would say in Judah.
7. Achish believed David and was content to think that because of this, David was no longer welcome in Israel.
1 Samuel 28: The medium of En-dor spells trouble for Saul
1. Achish’s false trust in David led him to take David to war against Israel even making him his personal body guard.
2. Upon engaging at Shunem by the Philistines and at Gilboa by Israel to do battle, Saul became fearful and sought the Lord; but, the Lord would not answer Saul.
3. Saul then told his servants to seek out a medium to inquire with her.
4. Under disguise, Saul was led to a medium at En-dor by night where he sought to see Samuel.
5. Saul explained to Samuel that he sought him for guidance how to confront the Philistines in the face of war.
6. Samuel informed Saul that he will lose to the Philistines and that he and his sons will die and join Samuel.
7. Saul was immediately filled with fear and at the insistence of the woman, he ate with his men and departed for his camp.
1 Samuel 29: David is rejected by the Philistines
1. As the commanders of the Philistines were passing by to gather for battle from Aphek, they asked Achish why the Hebrews were included with the force.
2. The Philistine commanders refused to allow David and his men to join their forces for fear that they would defect and return to Israel, for they knew of David’s tremendous skills in war.
3. Achish followed the demands of the lords of the Philistines and sent David and his men home to his assigned place in Ziklag.
1 Samuel 30: David’s wives and children captured at Ziklag
1.When David and his men arrived in Ziklag, they found that the Amalekites had burned the town and taken all women and children captive.
2. David and his men pursued the Amalekites and defeated them, striking down all but 400 who escaped on camels.
3. David and his men recovered all that was taken by the Amalekites including wives and children and returned to Ziklag.
1 Samuel 31: Saul’s demise at Mount Gilboa
1. In the battle between the Philistines and Israel, the men of Israel fled and fell slain on Mount Gilboa including Saul and his sons (Jonathan, Abinadab, and Malchi-shua).
2. Israel abandoned their cities and they became occupied by the Philistines.
3. The Philistines recovered the bodies of Saul and his sons.
4. The Philistines put Saul’s armor in the temple of Ashtaroh and they placed his body along with his sons on the wall in the temple of Beth-shan.
5. The Jabesh-gilead residents heard what the Philistines did and the valiant men went and recovered the bodies bringing them to Jabesh to burn while fasting for seven days.
2 Samuel 1: David learns of the Death of Saul and his sons
1. After the battle at Mount Gilboa, a man came to David from Saul’s camp informing him that Saul and his sons had died.
2. David asked the man how he knew that Saul and his sons were dead and the man said that he struck Saul after he was fallen by arrows because he was sure that Saul could not survive.
3. The man explained that he took Saul’s crown and armlet to bring them to David for proof of his explanation.
4. David had the man executed for putting Saul to death; specifically, for killing the Lord’s anointed.
5. David lamented Saul and Jonathan
2 Samuel 2: Anointing of David, King of Judah
1. David inquired of the Lord as to where he was to go and the Lord said to “Go up to Hebron.”
2. David took his two wives and his men to live in the town of Hebron where he was anointed king over the house of Judah.
3. David blessed the men of Jabesh-gilead for burying Saul.
4. However, Abner, commander of Saul’s army, took Ish-bosheth, son of Saul, and made him king over Israel at Mahanaim setting up more confrontation; this time between Israel and Judah.
5. Initially, twelve men from Judah and Israel were chosen to battle at Gibeon which finally ended with Joab blowing the trumpet to cease engaging with Abner for the immediate situation.

Week #43; Wed, 10/24/18: 2 Samuel 3-10

Week #43; Wed, 10/24/18: 2 Samuel 3:1-10:19

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. A long war took place between the house of David and the house of Saul; David’s house prevailed in the end.
2. David is a new thing in Israel; he is the natural, obvious, and Yahweh-willed successor to Saul.
3. The transfer of legitimacy must demonstrate David as the rightful successor to Saul.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Samuel 3: Abner and David unite both houses
1. While Abner ruled Saul’s house, he was intent to do what the Lord promised David in spite of consolidating his personal power in the vacuum of Saul and over-running Ishbosheth, Saul’s son.
2. Abner transfers the kingdom of Saul to set up the throne of David over Israel and over Judah, from Dan to Beersheba.
3. David insisted that Michal, Saul’s daughter and David’s wife, be returned to him.
4. When Abner departed, Joab arrived and became enraged when he learned that Abner had come to David at Hebron with twenty men.
5. Privately, and unbeknownst to David, Joab struck Abner and killed him for killing his brother Asahel at the battle at Gibeon.
6. David and all the people mourn Abner at his burial in Hebron; it became well known that it was not David’s will to put Abner to death.
2 Samuel 4: David’s response to the murder of Ish-bosheth
1. After Abner died at Hebron, two Benjamite men, Baanah and Rechab, killed Ish-bosheth and brought the news to David.
2. The men believed David would receive them gladly; however, David seized them and killed them for killing a righteous man as he had in the past at the news of the death of Saul and his sons.
2 Samuel 5: David becomes king of Israel
1. When David was 30, all the tribes of Israel came to David at Hebron and recognized him as the one who led out and brought in Israel even during Saul’s reign.
2. So, all the elders told David as the Lord had said, “You shall be shepherd of my people Israel.” and he reigned for 40 years.
2 Samuel 6: The Ark is brought to Jerusalem
1. David and his men went to Jerusalem and transformed it into a stronghold and called it the “city of David.”
2. David became greater and greater, for the Lord, the God of hosts was with him.
3. David knew that the Lord had established him king over Israel, and he exalted his kingdom for the sake of Israel.
4. Hiram king of Tyre sent cedar trees, carpenters, and masons to build King David a house.
5. When the Philistines heard David became king of Israel, they came up against him in the Valley of Rephaim.
6. David inquired of the Lord about going up to meet them and the Lord told David to do so; David defeated them at Baal-perazim and carried away their idols.
7. The Philistines came up a second time at the Valley of Rephaim and again they were defeated from Gaza to Gezer.
8. David went to Baale-judah with 30,000 men to bring up from there the ark of God (called: the Lord of hosts who sits enthroned on the cherubim) to Jerusalem.
9. David and all the house of Israel were making merry before the Lord, with songs, lyres, harps, tambourines, castanets, and cymbals until Uzzah saw an ox stumble at the threshing floor of Nacon; Uzzah died when he reached out to stabilize the ark of God on the ox cart.
10. David became angry and was not willing to take the ark of the Lord into the city of David, instead he took it to the house of Obed-edom, the Gittite.
11. After 3 months, David learned that the Lord had blessed the household of Obed-edom, so he went and brought up the ark of God to the city of David with sacrifice and rejoicing.
12. David danced before the Lord with all his might while wearing a linen ephod to the sound of shouts and horns.
13. Michal saw the procession as the ark entered the city and she despised David in her heart for uncovering himself before the eyes of his servants.
14. When the ark of the Lord was placed in a tent made for it by David, he offered a burnt offering and a peace offering.
15. David returned to bless his household, but Michal confronted him, expressing her disgust over his shameful public performance.
16. David said to her that it was before the Lord who chose him above her father and all of his house and he would make himself even more contemptible in her eyes; Michal had no children to the day of her death.
2 Samuel 7: God makes a covenant with David
1. After David’s house was completed and peace reigned in Israel, David felt uneasy about the ark of God being in just a tent.
2. God spoke to Nathan, the prophet, how He plans to rise up David’s offspring to build Him a house; not David.
3. The Lord promised that David’s offspring will have a great kingdom and it’s throne will be established forever; His steadfast love will not depart from him as it was taken from Saul.
4. David prayed at the news delivered by Nathan giving thanks and gratitude to the Lord for all that the Lord has done and will do for the kingdom of Israel as revealed to the prophet by the God of Israel.
2 Samuel 8: David defeats his enemies
1. The Lord gave victory to David wherever he went, from the Edomites, Ammonites, Philistines, Amalekites, and the kingdom of Zobah; he took spoils of gold, silver, bronze to Jerusalem while building garrisons in the lands that were taken.
2. David put officials in place to administer justice and equity to all his people.
2 Samuel 9: David comforts Mephibosheth
1. David showed Mephibosheth (he was lame in both feet) kindness for the sake of his father Jonathan, the son of Saul.
2. David told Mephibosheth he would restore to him all of the land of Saul and he would eat at his table always.
3. David commanded Ziba, Saul’s servant, to till the land for Mephibosheth and bring in the produce for him; however, Mephibosheth would always eat at David’s table.
2 Samuel 10: David defeats Ammonites and Syrians
1. The king of the Ammonites died and David sent his servants to console his son Hanun since his father dealt loyally with him.
2. But, at the advice of his princes, they warned Hanun that David is untrustworthy and is only scouting out their land.
3. David’s men were shamed and abused and sent back to David.
4. When the Ammonites heard they had become a stench to David, they hired 23,000 Syrians to confront David.
5. Joab and Abishai, his brother, were sent to meet the Ammonites and Syrians and they defeated them.
6. A second time the Ammonites and the Syrians arrayed themselves against David and fought with him and a second time they were defeated; they made peace with Israel and became subject to them.

Week #44; Wed, 10/31/18: 2 Samuel 11-15

Week #44; Wed, 10/31/18: 2 Samuel 11:1-15:37

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. David and Bathsheba were tied to political ruthlessness by chance (or by plan . . . ?); we need to look at all sides.
2. We should inspect the shared life we have with David and Bathsheba under a lens of blessing and curse.
3. Ongoing conflict with the Ammonites has a thread that traces back to failures to cleanse the inhabitants of the lands since the crossing over the Jordan.
4. The stage sets Israel’s men of war against the Ammonites under the leadership of Joab; it is uncertain why David stayed in Jerusalem while his army was engaged in battle.
5. We know God has told David his son will build him a house (2 Samuel 7:12); Solomon was yet to arrive, but he was destined to show up in God’s time.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Samuel 11: David, Bathsheba
1. In the spring of the year, a time when kings went out to battle, David’s army was engaged with the Ammonites while King David remained in Jerusalem for uncertain reasons.
2. One afternoon after napping, David strolled around on his roof and his attention was drawn to a beautiful woman bathing nearby.
3. David sent his servants to inquire about her and later sent others to summons her to his palace.
4. The woman was named Bathsheba, the wife of Uriah, the Hittite who was deployed against the Ammonites.
5. Bathsheba became pregnant by David and conceived a son; she later sent David news of her condition.
6. Her condition dictated that it be addressed quickly by David to avert a major scandal that could threaten his kingdom.
7. David sent a message to Joab to have Uriah return home from battle with the Ammonites.
8. Upon dining with David, he was told to go to his home and family; however, Uriah instead did not go home but stayed at the door of the king’s palace with the king’s servants.
9. David learned that another course of action was needed to hide his sin with Bathsheba; he returned him to Joab at the battlefront with a sealed letter describing his own demise.
10. Joab read David’s letter and complied by putting Uriah at the most dangerous point of combat where he died.
11. Joab sent notice to David that Uriah was dead.
12. Following the news of Uriah, Bathsheba lamented over her husband; but, she went to David and became his wife, delivering him a son.
13. However, the Lord was displeased with what David did.
2 Samuel 12: Nathan’s Rebuke
1. The Lord sent Nathan to David saying the story of a little ewe lamb that was misappropriated by a rich man to feed his guest while he had plenty of lambs of his own.
2. David, upon hearing the unfair story, was infuriated and demanded that the man die and restore the lamb fourfold.
3. Nathan, told David, “You are the man!”
4. “The Lord says a sword shall never depart from your house, because you have despised me and have taken the wife of Uriah to be your wife.”
5. Further, “I will raise up evil against you out of your own house and I will take your wives before your eyes and give them to your neighbor.”
6. Although the Lord put away David’s sin, the son born to him will die.
7. David remarked that, “I shall go to him, but he will not return to me.” which is a solid inference that children will go to heaven.
8. Bathsheba conceived again and bore David another son; his name was Solomon (and also Jedidiah).
9. Meanwhile, Joab captured the Ammonite’s royal city of Rabbah and the city of waters.
10. Upon Joab’s news, David went to Rabbah taking the crown of gold and jewels from the kings head to wear, along with a great amount of spoils.
11. The people were also brought out and set to labor for David and the Israelites.
2 Samuel 13: Amnon and Tamar
1. At the crafty suggestion of Jonadab, Amnon set about to lustfully pursue Tamar, his sister and Absalom’s sister.
2. After he succeeded, he despised Tamar and shamed her.
3. As Absalom learned of Tamar’s distress and disgrace, he plotted to kill Amnon which was accomplished two years later during a feast near Ephraim.
4. When David learned what Absalom did to Amnon, he wept very bitterly.
5. Absalom fled and went to Talmai in Geshur for three years while David was left in mourning.
2 Samuel 14: Return of Absalom
1. Joab conspired with a woman to have her pretend to be in mourning and give a false account to the king; however, it backfired when the woman revealed the plot.
2. As David learned of the plot, he commanded Joab to go back to Absalom and bring him back to Jerusalem to live in his own house but not to come into the presence of David.
3. Joab followed David’s command and Absalom lived in his own house but did not come into the presence of David.
4. Absalom was a handsome man having three sons and one daughter named Tamar, a beautiful woman.
5. Absalom stayed out of the presence of the king for three years and then sought an audience via Joab.
6. David kissed Absalom when he came into his presence.
2 Samuel 15: Absalom conspires with the people
1. Absalom appealed to the people in public to become a judge in the land, promising justice.
2. Absalom displayed public affection to all those who came to him for judgment and thus stealing the hearts of the men of Israel.
3. After four years, Absalom sought to go to Hebron to pay homage for a vow he alleged and David granted Absalom this request.
4. The people with Absalom kept increasing until it was reported to David that the hearts of the men of Israel have gone after Absalom.
5. David and his men departed Jerusalem.
6. Hushai, the Archite followed David out to the Mount of Olives, pleading to go along with him; however, David asked him to return to Jerusalem and serve Absalom getting word and providing it to David.

Week #45; Wed, 11/07/18: 2 Samuel 16-20

Week #45; Wed, 11/07/18: 2 Samuel 16:1-20:26

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. After fleeing Jerusalem, David maintained a very strong and effective intelligence network via the sons of the priests and had great support among the people.
2. God continues to watch over the actions of David with protective care.
3. David’s son, Absalom, dies in an unusual manner while in pursuit of his father and his men.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Samuel 16: David, Ziba, Shimei, and Absalom
1. In his flight from Jerusalem, David received unexpected support from Ziba, a servant of Mephibosheth, with donkeys, bread, raisins, summer fruits, and a skin of wine.
2. However, Shimei, of the house of Saul, accosted David at Bahurim cursing him and calling him “a man of blood, a worthless man.”
3. David dismissed Shimei, saying to his men, “leave him alone for the Lord may be guiding him to speak harshly of me.”
4. Absalom enters Jerusalem with the people and men of Israel only to be advised by Ahithophel, David’s former counselor, to insult his father, David, in the sight of all Israel by committing lewdness with all ten of David’s concubines that were left behind.
2 Samuel 17: Hushai Saves David
1. Upon Ahithophel’s counsel to Absalom to mount up 12,000 men to strike down David and return his men, Hushai was summoned for advice also.
2. Hushai warned against the counsel of Ahithophel, saying that David is an expert warrior and the men that are with him are valiant men.
3. Instead, Hushai advised that Absalom himself gather men from all of the people of Israel and that Absalom should lead them to strike all of those led by David.
4. The Lord gave support to the counsel of Hushai over Ahithophel so that Absalom may come to harm.
5. But, word got to David of Absalom’s intentions including the appointment of Amasa at the head of the army instead of Joab.
2 Samuel 18: Absalom is Killed
1. David gathered his men with Joab, Abishai, and Ittai in command and sent them out into the field against Israel giving orders to be gentle with Absalom; the commanders insisted that David remain behind for his protection.
2. The men of Israel were defeated by David’s servants who killed 20,000 men at Ephraim with the forest devouring more people than the sword that day.
3. As the battle progressed, Absalom met with his demise while riding his mule that went under a large oak trapping his head in a fork as the mule continued away from the scene.
4. While suspended alive in the oak, Joab ignored David and pierced his heart with three javelins followed by additional death blows from Joab’s armor bearers; the men of Israel under Absalom fled and returned to their homes.
5. Upon hearing that Absalom died in the battle, David heavily grieved the death of his son.
2 Samuel 19: David Rebuked by Joab
1. When Joab learned that David was weeping and mourning, he addressed David saying, arise and speak to all the people to restore them in following him.
2. David returns to Jerusalem and appoints Amasa commander of the army in place of Joab.
3. David pardons his enemies upon crossing the Jordan in route to Jerusalem.
2 Samuel 20: Rebellion by Sheba
1. Upon the declaration of Sheba, a Benjaminite, all the men of Israel withdrew from David and followed him.
2. David called all the men of Judah to pursue Sheba under the command of Amasa; however, Joab killed Amasa in Gibeon with a sword.
3. Joab and Abishai, his brother, took over the role of commander of the army from Amasa to pursue Sheba.
4. Sheba was killed at Abel of Beth-maacah where he was hold up; all of the men following Joab dispersed to their home and Joab returned to Jerusalem to the king.

Week #46; Wed, 11/14/18: 2 Samuel 21-1 Kings 1

Week #46; Wed, 11/14/18: 2 Samuel 21:1-1 Kings 1:53

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. While David’s song of deliverance (ch. 22) gives thanks and praise to the Lord, for protection from all of the harm he faced from temporal earthly threats, he also identifies salvation in an eternal context with regard to becoming blameless, purified, and humble, for all that take refuge in Him.
2. An additional threat to the kingdom arose from Adonijah, the son of Haggith; but David’s mighty men were not with Adonijah.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Samuel 21: David and the Gibeonites
1. David sought the Lord due to a recurring three year famine.
2. The Lord said to David that the famine was because Saul, in his zeal for Israel and Judah, put the Gibeonites to death.
3. So, David said to the Gibeonites that he wanted to make atonement for the past and sought their blessings.
4. The Gibeonites told David that they wanted to hang seven sons of Saul in Gibeah as retribution for Saul’s acts toward them.
5. David agreed to give them to them; he spared Mephibosheth, the son of Saul’s son Jonathan, because of the oath of the Lord that was between them.
6. Seven others were put to death together on the mountain by the Gibeonites in the first days of barley harvest.
7. David retrieved the bones of Saul and Jonathan, and the bones of those that were hanged, and buried them in the tomb of Kish with the bones of Saul’s father.
8. However, there was war again with the Philistines and David and his men went down to fight them.
9. David was threatened by Ishbi-benob, a descendent of the giants; but he was saved by Abishai.
10. Following the threat to David, his men said to him, “You will not go to battle with us again for fear of seeing the lamp of Israel quenched.”
11. Wars continued with David and his men victorious; killing four descendants of the giants (one had six fingers and six toes).
2 Samuel 22: Song of Deliverance by David
1. David sang a song of deliverance on the day when the Lord delivered him from the hand of all his enemies, and from the hand of Saul.
2. David’s song contains not only his thanks for relief from his temporal earthly threats, but it also contains thanks for his forgiveness and eternal salvation.
2 Samuel 23: David’s Last Words
1. As in David’s song of deliverance, the theme of his last words recurs here to reflect on his temporal and eternal strength and assurance derived from the Lord and his Spirit.
2. Noteworthy is his saying on rulers, “When one rules justly over men, ruling in the fear of God, he dawns on them like the morning light, like the sun shining forth on a cloudless morning, like rain that makes grass to sprout from the earth.”
3. The mighty men of David are recorded by Samuel: Josheb-basshebeth, Eleazar, Shammah, and Abishai (chief of the thirty mighty men).
4. Among the thirty mighty men, Benaiah was a stand out; along with Uriah, the Hittite (husband of Bathsheba and unfortunate victim of David’s lust for his wife).
2 Samuel 24: Census Count by David
1. The Lord’s anger was kindled against Israel, and he moved David to count Israel and Judah.
2. Joab, although reluctant and questioning his orders from David, went with his army and counted all the people and reported that in Israel there were 800,000 men and in Judah there were 500,000 men; 1,300,000 total valiant men who drew the sword.
3. David realized he had done foolishly and his heart struck him to say, “I have sinned greatly; he pleaded with the Lord to take away his iniquity.”
4. Through Gad, the prophet, three choices were delivered from the Lord for David to consider only one; 3 year famine, 3 months fleeing from foes, or 3 days of pestilence in the land.
5. Pestilence came and 70,000 men died by the Angel of the Lord until he relented as he stretched out his hand toward Jerusalem.
6. Then David spoke to the Lord saying, “I have sinned, and I have done wickedly . . . let Your hand be against me.”
7. Gad returned and instructed David to build an altar to the Lord on the threshing floor of Araunah, the Jebusite; David did as the Lord commanded.
8. He bought the threshing floor with silver, built an altar, and presented burnt and peace offerings.
9. The Lord ended the plague and Israel was averted from more deaths.
1 Kings 1: David in Old Age
1. David could not get warm in his old age, so his servants recommended that a young woman be found that would wait on him and lie in his arms that he might be warm.
2. Abishag, the Shunammite, was brought to the king; she was very beautiful, but the king knew her not.
3. Independent of David, Adonijah, son of Haggith, sought to become king by preparing chariots and horsemen while conferring with Joab, the army commander, and Abiathar, the priest, for him to claim the throne.
4. However, Zadok, Benaiah, Nathan, Shimei, Rei and David’s mighty men were not with Adonijah.
5. When Nathan heard of Adonijah’s planned sacrifice and invitation to all his brothers, and all of the officials of Judah, he told Bathsheba, mother of Solomon.
6. Nathan told Bathsheba to tell David of Adonijah’s plan which he would then confirm.
7. Bathsheba was assured by David that Solomon would be the next king, not Adonijah; David had Solomon anointed king the same day by Zakok, Nathan, and Benaiah at Gihon.
8. When Adonijah heard that Solomon, his brother, was anointed king, he took the horns of the altar for he feared Solomon; he pleaded for Solomon not to put him to death.
9. Solomon was told of Adonijah’s plea and promised that he may go to his house if he does no wickedness again; Adonijah paid homage to King Solomon.

Week #47; Wed, 11/21/18: 1 Kings 2-6

Week #47; Wed, 11/21/18: 1 Kings 2:1-6:38

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The boundaries of the kingdom of Solomon appears to coincide with the boundaries of Israel originally identified by the Lord for the “Promised Land” in Genesis 15, 17, Exodus 23, and Ezekiel 47.
2. I’ve noticed words of reasoning being used like “if, then, and, else” that are familiar to us current readers that make for exact conditional outcomes and outputs for both David and Solomon, his son.
3. Failure to meet conditions make for likely adverse impact on the boundaries noted above; the Lord places high value on boundaries in His plans (Acts 17:26-27 pertains).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Kings 2: David Instructs Solomon
1. As David’s time drew near to his end, he commands Solomon to be strong, keep the charge of the Lord, walk in His ways, keep His statutes, commandments, rules, and testimonies recorded in the Law of Moses in order to prosper in all he does.
2. David instructed Solomon to pay close attention to his way, to walk before the Lord in faithfulness with all his heart and soul in order to continue keeping a man on the throne of Israel as was promised to David.
3. David also identified key people that Solomon should act out upon through his wisdom to blunt further hostilities toward the throne and to shield those close to David.
4. David was buried in the city of David after reigning for forty years.
5. Solomon sat on the throne of David and his kingdom was firmly established.
6. Later, Solomon’s half-brother, Adonijah (son of Haggith), persisted to gain Abishag as his wife by approaching Bathsheba to speak on his behalf.
7. However, when Bathsheba spoke to Solomon about the matter, he rebuked her and had Adonijah put to death.
8. Solomon continued to clean out the house of his father, David, by expelling Abiathar, the priest; executing Joab for shedding innocent blood of two men (Abner and Amasa); and killing Shimei for all the harm he did to David (and for crossing over the brook of Kidron to go after his servants that ran away).

1 Kings 3: Solomon Prays for Wisdom
1. Because Solomon was very young, he put his highest priority on ruling justly for the vast numbers of people in his kingdom.
2. Solomon loved the Lord and at the time of great sacrifice in Gibeon, the Lord appeared to Solomon in a dream and asked him “What shall I give you?”
3. Solomon asked for the Lord to give him an “understanding mind” to govern the people with the ability to discern between good and evil.
4. The Lord said to him, “Because you have asked this, and have not asked for yourself long life or riches or the life of your enemies, but have asked for yourself understanding to discern what is right, I will do according to your word.”
5. The Lord said to Solomon, “Behold, I give you a wise and discerning mind, so that none like you has been before you and none like you shall arise after you.”
6. Further, the Lord said, “I will give you also what you have not asked, both riches and honor, so that no other king shall compare with you, all your days.”
7. The Lord also said to Solomon He would “lengthen your days if you will walk in my ways, keeping my statutes and my commandments as your father David walked.”
8. Solomon’s wisdom was on great display in settling the dispute between two women that came before the throne to plead their case over the rightful claim over a living and a dead child; Solomon gave the living child to the woman who sought to spare the child when he attempted to divide the child in half with a sword.

1 Kings 4: Solomon’s High Officials
1. Solomon had 12 officers over all of Israel; they provided food for the king and his household each month in turn (Ben-abinadab had taken Taphath, Solomon’s daughter as his wife and Ahimaaz had taken Basemath, Solomon’s daughter as his wife).
2. Solomon ruled over all the kingdoms from the Euphrates to the land of the Philistines and to the border of Egypt; they brought tribute and served Solomon all the days of his life.
3. God gave Solomon wisdom and understanding beyond measure, and breadth of mind that was unsurpassed; he was wiser that all other men and his fame was in all the surrounding nations.
4. Solomon spoke 3,000 proverbs and his songs were 1,005; all people and nations came to hear the wisdom of Solomon.

1 Kings 5: Solomon Prepares to Build the Temple
1. David could not build a house for the name of the Lord his God because of the warfare with which his enemies surrounded him.
2. Solomon told Hiram, king of Tyre, “But now the Lord my God has given me rest on every side and I intend to build a house for the name of the Lord my God as the Lord said to David my father.”
3. Solomon commanded that cedars of Lebanon be cut by the Sidonians for the building of the temple.
4. Hiram rejoiced at the message of Solomon and promised to prepare cedar and cypress timbers for the building to take place.
5. The timbers were made into rafts to go by sea and delivered from there; Solomon provided food and oil year by year to Hiram and a treaty of peace was made between them.
6. Over 180,000 laborers were involved in the building of the temple; they quarried out great, costly stones and cut and prepared timbers for the building to come.

1 Kings 6: Solomon Builds the Temple
1. Precise measurements and designs went into the construction of the temple; all preparations were done off-site and neither hammer nor axe nor any tool of iron was heard in the house while it was being built.
2. So Solomon built the house and finished it; then the word of the Lord came to Solomon, “Concerning this house that you are building, if you will walk in my statutes and obey my rules and keep all my commandments and walk in them, then I will establish my word with you, which I spoke to David your father. And I will dwell among the children of Israel and will not forsake my people Israel.”
3. Gold overlay was reserved for special parts “of” and items “in” the house of the Lord (i.e., the Most Holy Place, the ark of the covenant of the Lord, two cherubim, the altar, the inside of the sanctuary, etc.).
3. It took seven years to finish the house of the Lord.

Week #48; Wed, 11/28/18: 1 Kings 7-10

Week #48; Wed, 11/28/18: 1 Kings 7:1-10:29

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. While it took 7 years to build the House of the Lord; it took 13 years for Solomon to build his palace.
2. Solomon included in his prayer of dedication a provision for any defeat of the people, drought on the land, famine, pestilence, blight, mildew, or plague that includes “turning” from sin and “acknowledging” the name of the Lord while “praying and pleading” with the Lord in “fear” for “forgiveness;” a format that still holds true today.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Kings 7, Solomon’s Palace
1. It took 13 years for Solomon to build his own house named the House of the Forest of Lebanon; it was made of cedar.
2. The house included a Hall of pillars with a porch and a canopy.
3. He made a Hall of Thrones to pronounce judgment (Hall of Judgment)
4. He made a house like his house for Pharaoh’s daughter, his wife.
5. The house of the Lord was also built with a great court, an inner court, and a vestibule.
6. The Temple furnishings were made by Hiram from Tyre, a man full of wisdom, understanding, and skill for making any work in bronze.
7. Solomon brought in the things that David his father had dedicated, the silver, the gold, and the vessels, and stored them in the treasuries of the house of the Lord.

1 Kings 8, The Ark Brought into the Temple
1. Solomon assembled the elders, heads of the tribes, and leaders of the father’s houses of the people of Israel to bring up the ark of the covenant of the Lord out of the city of David (Zion).
2. The feast at the month of Ethanim, the seventh month, was ongoing.
3. The priests took up the ark of the Lord, the tent of meeting, and all the holy vessels that were in the tent and brought them up.
4. King Solomon and all the congregation of Israel who had assembled, sacrificed an untold number of sheep and oxen.
5. The priests brought the ark of the covenant of the Lord to its place in the inner sanctuary of the house, in the Most Holy Place, underneath the wings of the cherubim.
6. The cherubim spread out their wings over the place of the ark so that the cherubim overshadowed the ark and its poles.
7. The ark contained the two tablets of stone that Moses put there at Horeb, where the Lord made a covenant with the people of Israel, when they came out of the land of Egypt.
8. When the priests came out of the Holy Place, a cloud filled the House of the Lord; the glory of the Lord filled the house of the Lord.
9. Solomon said, “The Lord has said that he would dwell in thick darkness. I have indeed built you an exalted house, a place for you to dwell in forever.”
10. Solomon also blessed all of the assembly of Israel while they stood saying, “Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel, who has fulfilled his promise to David my father.”
11. Although David had it in his heart to build a house for the name of the Lord, the Lord assigned Solomon the task which has now been fulfilled.
12. Solomon rose to the place of his father and sits on the throne of Israel.
13. Solomon prayed before the altar of the Lord in the presence of all the assembly of Israel to give thanks for all he has done for his people and for placing a man (his father) on the throne of Israel.
14. The Lord promised to keep a man like David before him on the throne of Israel if only his sons pay close attention to their way, to walk before me as you (David) have walked before me.
15. Solomon included provisions for foreigners in his prayer when they pray and fear the Lord.
16. Following Solomon’s benediction, the king and all Israel, offered sacrifice (120,000 oxen, 22,000 sheep) before the Lord to dedicate the house of the Lord.

1 Kings 9, The Lord Appears to Solomon
1. The Lord said to Solomon, “I have heard your prayer and your plea.”
2. The Lord said, “As for you, if you will walk before me, as David your father walked, with integrity of heart and uprightness, doing according to all that I have commanded you, and keeping my statutes and my rules, then I will establish your royal throne over Israel forever, as I promised David your father, saying, ‘You shall not lack a man on the throne of Israel. But if you turn aside from following me, you or your children, and do not keep my commandments and my statutes that I have set before you, but go and serve other gods and worship them, then I will cut off Israel from the land that I have given them and the house that I have consecrated for my name I will cast out of my sight, and Israel will become a proverb and this house will become a heap of ruins.’
3. People will say, ‘because they abandoned the Lord their God who brought their fathers out of the land of Egypt and laid hold on other gods and worshiped them and served them, the Lord has brought all this disaster upon them.'”
4. Solomon gave Hiram 20 cities for his work over the twenty years of construction; but Hiram disapproved the cities although he sent Solomon 120 talents of gold.
5. Solomon and Hiram built a fleet of ships in the land of Edom near the Red Sea; in going to Ophir, they brought 420 talents of gold to Solomon.

1 Kings 10, The Queen of Sheba
1. When the Queen of Sheba learned of all of the wealth and wisdom of King Solomon, she came bearing abundant gifts; she was overcome with all that she saw.
2. The Queen of Sheba gave the king 120 talents of gold, and a very great quantity of spies and precious stones.
3. Using his fleet of ships, Hiram also brought gold, almug wood, and precious stones from Ophir.
4. 666 talents of gold came to Solomon in one year besides that which came from the explorers and business merchants.
5. The king also made a great ivory throne and many gold shields.
6. Hiram’s fleet expanded with ships in Tarshish that bought gold, silver, ivory, apes, and peacocks.
7. King Solomon excelled all the kings of the earth in riches and in wisdom.

Week #49; Wed, 12/05/18: 1 Kings 11-15

Week #49; Wed, 12/05/18: 1 Kings 11:1-15:34

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The Lord said to the people of Israel, “You shall not enter into marriage with foreign women, neither shall they with you, for surely they will turn away your heart after their gods.”
2. Solomon fell away from the Lord by loving many foreign women; he had over 1,000 wives, princesses, and concubines total.
3. In his old age, Solomon’s heart strayed from that of his father David; he built places of worship to the gods of his wives that were an abomination to the Lord.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Kings 11, Solomon Disobeys the Lord
1. Because of Solomon’s evil actions with foreign wives and the building of temples in honor of their foreign gods, the Lord’s anger was kindled and He planned to tear the kingdom from Solomon during his son’s reign that followed, thus giving recognition to the covenant between the Lord and David.
2. Not all of the kingdom was to be torn away; one tribe was to be given to Solomon’s son for the sake of David and Jerusalem.
3. Hadad the Edomite became an adversary against Solomon by the will of the Lord.
4. After Hadad, Rezon (a king in Damascus) was also raised up by the Lord to be an adversary against Solomon and he did harm to Israel.
5. Jeroboam, son of Nebat an Ephraimite, also lifted up his hand against Solomon over the building of the Millo (a defensive wall in Jerusalem) closing up the breach to the city of David his father; this resulted in Jeroboam fleeing to Egypt until the death of Solomon.
6. Rehoboam was made king over Israel after his father Solomon slept with his fathers.

1 Kings 12, The Folly of Rehoboam
1. All Israel was in Shechem to make Rehoboam king.
2. When Jeroboam heard of this, he returned to Israel.
3. Together with all of Israel, Jeroboam went to Rehoboam asking him to lighten their load that was heavy from the days of Solomon.
4. Instead, Rehoboam added to their load based on poor counsel from his youthful friends.
5. The turn of affairs that the Lord was to bring about to fulfill his word was spoken to Ahijah.
6. The people of Israel went away leaving Rehoboam who fled to Jerusalem to reign over Judah.
7. Israel rebelled against the house of David making Jeroboam king; there was none that followed the house of David but the tribe of Judah thereby dividing the kingdom.
8. Rehoboam assembled Judah and Benjamin (180,000 strong) to fight against Israel to restore the kingdom.
9. The Lord’s word came to Shemaiah, the man of God to tell Rehoboam not to go up or fight against Israel and Rehoboam listened.
10. However, Jeroboam built Shechem in the hill country to live, but he feared death from Rehoboam and Judah.
11. Foolishly, Jeroboam built two calves of gold putting one in Bethel and one in Dan along with temples in high places where he appointed priests that were not Levites, held feasts, and offered sacrifices on the altar.

1 Kings 13, Jeroboam Confronted by a Man of God
1. A man of God came out of Judah to confront Jeroboam at the altar saying, “O altar, altar, thus says the Lord, ‘Behold, a son shall be born to the house of David, Josiah by name and he shall sacrifice on you the priests of the high places who make sacrifices on you, and human bones shall be burned on you.'”
2. The man of God also said, “Behold, the altar shall be torn down, and the ashes that are on it shall be poured out.”
3. The prophet was directed to not return home by the way that he came and not eat bread or drink water in the place where the altar was torn down.
4. But an old prophet in Bethel invited the man of God from Judah to come home with him under a false pretense to eat bread and drink water in disobedience to the Lord.
5. When the man of God departed to Judah, he was met by a lion on the road and he was killed.
6. Yet, Jeroboam did not turn from his evil ways, but made priests for the high places again becoming sin to the house of Jeroboam.

1 Kings 14, Prophecy Against Jeroboam
1. Abijah, the son of Jeroboam fell sick at that time.
2. Jeroboam sent his wife to Shiloh to Ahijah, the prophet, to learn what will happen to the child.
3. Ahijah told Jeroboam’s wife that the child will die as soon as she returned to Judah and the house of Jeroboam will be cut off from Israel and burned up.
4. Ahijah also stated that “the Lord will raise up for himself a king over Israel who will cut off the house of Jeroboam today.”
5. Further, he said, “the Lord will strike Israel as a reed is shaken in the water, and root up Israel out of this good land that he gave to their fathers and scatter them beyond the Euphrates, because they have made their Asherim, provoking the Lord to anger.”
6. Jeroboam ruled for 22 years and he slept with his fathers; Nadab his son reigned in his place.
7. Rehoboam reigned in Judah for 17 years in Jerusalem, the city the Lord had chosen out of all the tribes of Israel, to put his name there.
8. There was war between Rehoboam and Jeroboam continually.
9. Abijam, Rehoboam’s son, reigned in his place.

1 Kings 15, Abijam, Asa Rule in Judah; Nadab, Baasha Rule in Israel
1. Abijam walked in all of the sins of his father and his heart was not wholly true to the Lord his God.
2. Asa reigned 41 years over Judah in Jerusalem and he did what was right in the eyes of the Lord; Jehoshaphat his son reigned in his place.
3. Nadab reigned 2 years over Israel and he did evil in the sight of the Lord.
4. Baasha reigned 24 years over Israel and he did evil in the sight of the Lord.

Week #50; Wed, 12/12/18: 1 Kings 16-20

Week #50; Wed, 12/12/18: 1 Kings 16:1-20:43

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The book of Chronicles of the Kings of Israel pertains to the records of the kings recorded here; see a concordance for the direct correlations.
2. Prophets Jehu and Elijah deliver the word of the Lord against Israel’s kings (Elah, Zimri, Omri, and Ahab) for doing evil in the sight of the Lord.
3. Elijah destroyed the prophets of Baal and Asherah after a convincing demonstration with fire from the Lord who is the real God.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Kings 16, Elah, Zimri, Omri, and Ahab Reign in Israel doing evil in the sight of the Lord
1. The word of the Lord came against Baasha and all of his house by the prophet Jehu; Baasha did evil in the sight of the Lord like the house of Jeroboam.
2. Elah, the son of Baasha, ruled for two years and he continued to do evil in the sight of the Lord.
3. While drunk, Elah was struck down by Zimri, the commander of half his chariots.
4. Zimri ruled in Elah’s place and he struck down all of the house of Baasha.
5. Zimri continued to do evil in the sight of the Lord, walking in the way of Jeroboam.
6. Omri became king and reigned for twelve years and he continued to do evil greater than all who were before him walking in the way of Jeroboam.
7. Ahab, son of Omri, reigned for twenty-two years and he continued to do greater evil than his father and all of the kings before him (building an altar for Baal and an Ashera).

1 Kings 17, Elijah Predicts a Drought
1. Elijah, the prophet, said to Ahab that a drought would come upon the land; no dew or rain will come except by the word of the Lord.
2. Elijah was told by the Lord to travel to the brook Cherith east of the Jordan to hide where the ravens would bring him bread and meat; but when the brook ran dry for lack of rain, the Lord told him to travel to Zerephath to dwell.
3. The Lord commanded a widow there to feed Elijah with her last flour and oil that she was preparing for herself and her son before resolving to die together.
4. Elijah said to her, “Do not fear; go and do as you have said, but first make me a little cake of it and bring it to me, and afterward make something for yourself and your son. ‘The jar of flour shall not be spent, and the jug of oil shall not be empty, until the day the Lord sends rain upon the earth.'”
5. Later, the widow’s son became severely ill and Elijah stretched himself out upon the child three times and cried out to the Lord to let his life come into him again; he revived.

1 Kings 18, Elijah’s Confrontation With Ahab
1. After three years of drought, the Lord came to Elijah saying, “Go, show yourself to Ahab, and I will send rain upon the earth.”
2. Ahab and Obadiah (one of the Lord’s prophets) were separately going about to find water in all the land when Elijah came to Obadiah.
3. Elijah told Obadiah to go tell Ahab that Elijah was here, but Obadiah feared Ahab because Jezabel (Ahab’s wife) killed the prophets of the Lord.
4. But, Obadiah went to Ahab and told him; so Ahab went to meet Elijah.
5. Elijah said to Ahab that because he abandoned the commandments of the Lord and followed the Baals, he instructed Ahab to meet him at Mount Carmel along with the 450 prophets of Baal and the 400 prophets of Asherah that eat at Jezabel’s table.
6. When they met, Elijah said to Ahab and the prophets of Baal and Asherah, “How long will you limp between two different opinions? If the Lord is God, follow him; but if Baal, then follow him.”
7. Then Elijah told the people to cut two bulls into pieces and lay them on the wood (but put no fire to it), he then told Ahab’s prophets to call upon the name of their god, and then Elijah would call upon the name of the Lord to see which God answers by fire.
8. No answer came to the prophets of Baal, but when Elijah repaired the altar of the Lord that had been thrown down, he had water poured on the burnt offering and on the wood three times.
9. That same day, at the time of oblation, Elijah said, “O lord, God of Abraham, Isaac, and Israel, let it be known that you are God in Israel, and that I am your servant, and that I have done all these things at your word.”
10. Then the fire of the Lord fell and consumed the burnt offering, wood, stones, and dust.
11. Ahab’s people fell on their faces and said, “The Lord he is God; the Lord, he is God.”
12. Elijah brought the prophets of Baal to the brook of Kishon and slaughtered them there.
13. Elijah told Ahab to eat and drink, for there is a sound of the rushing of rain.
14. Elijah told his servant to go up and look toward the sea and report what they see; on the seventh time, a little cloud was seen that turned black bringing strong wind and great rain.
15. Elijah told Ahab to prepare his chariot and go to Jezreel; the hand of the Lord was on Elijah and he ran ahead of Ahab to the entrance of Jezreel.

1 Kings 19, Elijah Flees from Jezebel
1. When Ahab told his wife Jezabel what had happened, she threatened to kill Elijah.
2. Elijah fled to Beersheba in Judah.
3. After one days travel, Elijah asked the Lord to die while taking rest under a broom tree.
4. An angel touched him and said, “Arise and eat.” twice.
5. Elijah arose and ate the cake and drank the jar of water that was delivered to him and he went for forty days and nights to Horeb, the mount of God.
6. The Lord spoke to Elijah (after a great strong wind and an earthquake) telling him to go to Damascus and anoint Hazael king of Syria; to anoint Jehu king of Israel; and to anoint Elisha prophet in his place.
7. The Lord said 7,000 would be left in Israel after Hazael, Jehu and Elisha have put the rest to death.
8. Only those that have not bowed to Baal and kissed him will be left in Israel.
9. When Elijah met Elisha, Elisha followed Elijah and assisted him.

1 Kings 20, Ahab Assaulted by Ben-hadad of Syria
1. Ben-hadad of Syria threatened Ahab of Israel to take all of Ahab’s wives, children, gold and silver; Ahab’s elders advised him to ignore and resist Ben-hadad.
2. The Lord spoke to Ahab telling him to assemble all the 232 governors of the districts and the 7,000 people of Israel and go out and begin battle with Syria.
3. They found Ben-hadad and his 32 kings drinking themselves drunk in booths.
4. The Syrians fled before the men of Israel, but Ben-hadad escaped on a horse with horsemen.
5. The king of Israel struck the Syrians with a great blow.
6. Ben-hadad mustered another army to fight Israel in the spring in the plains because they believed the God of Israel was only in the hills, but Israel defeated the Syrians again even though greatly outnumbered.
7. A man of God came to the king of Israel telling him that because the Syrians have said that the “Lord is only a god of the hills but he is not a god of the valleys” I will give them into your hands, and you shall know that I am the Lord.
8. Syria lost 100,000 foot soldiers in one day and the rest fled into the city of Aphek where the wall fell upon 27,000 men who were left.
9. Ben-hadad promised to restore the cities that his father took from Ahab’s father, so Ahab let him go based on those terms.
10. Through a prophet, Ahab learned the Lord was angered because he let go the man he had devoted to destruction; he also learned that his life shall be for that man and his people shall be for that people.
11. Ahab went to his house vexed and sullen in Samaria.

Week #51; Wed, 12/19/18: 1 Kings 21–2 Kings 3

Week #51; Wed, 12/19/18: 1 Kings 21:1–2 Kings 3:27

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Many miraculous events took place by Elijah and Elisha that were worked on behalf of the Lord against evil in Israel.
2. There were good kings and bad kings throughout the times of the kings of Israel and Judah.
3. Other gods made Israel to sin but these gods were proved ineffective and false.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Kings 21, Naboth and Ahab, King of Samaria
1. Naboth owned a vineyard that he inherited from his fathers and it was located near the the house of King Ahab.
2. King Ahab’s greed led him to seek Naboth’s vineyard for his own.
3. Ahab offered to either give Naboth a better vineyard or purchase it outright for money.
4. Naboth refused because his vineyard had been the land he inherited from his fathers.
5. Ahab became upset and refused to eat; but when his wife Jezebel learned what happened, she told Ahab that she would give him the vineyard belonging to Naboth.
6. Jezebel wrote letters to the city elders and leaders to arrange a fast with Naboth at the head table between two worthless fellows that are to bring false charges against Naboth.
7. The two worthless fellows charged Naboth in the presence of the people saying, “You have cursed God and the King.”
8. Naboth was taken out and stoned to death and his death was reported to Jezebel.
9. Jezebel brought the news to Ahab that Naboth was dead; Ahab then went down to take possession of Naboth’s vineyard.
10. But the anger of the Lord was kindled against the house of Ahab and he sent Elijah to meet him in the vineyard.
11. Elijah carried the word of the Lord to Ahab saying, “In the place where the dogs licked up the blood of Naboth, they will lick up your blood because you have done evil in the sight of the Lord.”
12. Further, every male, bond or free, will be cut off from Ahab and his house will be like Jeroboam and Baasha because Ahab made Israel to sin.
13. Jezebel and anyone belonging to Ahab will also be eaten by the dogs within the walls of Jezreel; those that die in the open country will be eaten by the birds of heaven.
14. Ahab fasted and repented in sackcloth and the word of the Lord came to Elijah saying, “I will not bring the disaster in his days; but in his son’s days I will bring the disaster upon his house.”

1 Kings 22, False Prophets and Ahab
1. Jehoshaphat, the king of Judah came to the king of Israel and they agreed to reclaim Ramoth-gilead from the king of Syria.
2. Jehoshaphat told the king of Israel, “Inquire first for the word of the Lord.”
3. About 400 prophets were gathered together and they said, “Go up, for the Lord will give it into the hand of the king.”
4. But, Jehoshaphat sought another prophet and Micaiah was found.
5. Micaiah said, “I saw all Israel scattered on the mountains, as sheep that have no shepherd. And the Lord said, ‘These have no master; let each return to his home in peace.'”
6. But the Lord said, “Who will entice Ahab, that he may go up and fall at Ramoth-gilead?”; a spirit came before the Lord and said, “I will entice him.”
7. The spirit went out and enticed the prophets and Micaiah was thrown into prison and given bread and water.
8. So the king of Israel and Jehoshaphat the king of Judah went up to Ramoth-gilead to do battle.
9. An arrow from a random bow struck Ahab, king of Israel, and he later died in his chariot.
10. About sunset a cry went out, “Every man to his city, and every man to his country.”
11. As the blood of Ahab was washed from his chariot, the dogs came and licked up his blood.
12. Ahaziah, his son, reigned in his place for two years; he did what was evil in the sight of the Lord.
13. Ahaziah served Baal and worshiped him angering the Lord of Israel.
14. Jehoshaphat reigned in Israel for 25 years; he did what was right in the sight of the Lord, but he failed to remove the high places for sacrificing and making offerings.

2 Kings 1, Elijah Denounces Ahaziah, King of Samaria
1. Moab rebelled against Israel after the death of Ahab.
2. Ahaziah, Ahab’s son, was injured when he fell from his upper chamber and he sent messengers to go to Baal-zebub to inquire if he would recover.
3. The Lord said to Elijah to inform Ahaziah he would not come down from the bed to which he has entered, but that he would surly die.
4. Elijah met Ahaziah’s messengers and told them the Lord’s message regarding Ahaziah.
5. Ahaziah sent a captain and fifty men to Elijah who told him to come down from a mountain; but Elijah confronted the men saying, “If I am a man of God, let fire come down from heaven and consume you and your fifty.
6. Then fire came down from heaven and consumed him and his fifty.
7. Ahaziah sent a second captain and fifty men to order Elijah to come down, but Elijah replied as he did for the first captain.
8. The fire of God came down again and destroyed the second captain and his men.
9. Ahaziah sent a third captain and fifty men to Elijah who fell on his knees pleading to let him live.
10. The angel of the Lord said to Elijah, “Go with him to see the king.”
11. Elijah said to the king, “You shall not come down from the bed to which you have gone up, but you shall surely die.”
12. Ahaziah died and Jehoram, son of Jehoshaphat, became king in his place because Ahaziah had no son.

2 Kings 2, Elijah Taken Up to Heaven
1. Elijah and Elisha were traveling to Gilgal when the Lord was about to take Elijah up to heaven by a whirlwind.
2. Elijah told Elisha to stay put; however, Elisha told Elijah that “I will not leave you.”
3. Again, while on the way to Jericho Elijah told Elisha to stay back, but Elisha told Elijah that “I will not leave you.”
4. And again, while on the way to the Jordan, Elijah told Elisha to stay, but Elisha told Elijah that “I will not leave you.”
5. But as was prophesied by the prophets of Jericho, Elijah took his cloak and rolled it up and struck the water; the water was parted till the two men could go over on dry ground.
6. Before Elijah was lifted up, he asked Elisha what he should do for him; Elisha said, “Please let there be a double portion of your spirit on me.”
7. Elijah told Elisha that if he saw him being taken in a whirlwind, it would be so.
7. As they continued to walk, chariots of fire and horses of fire separated the two of them and Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven.
8. Elisha saw Elijah go up in the whirlwind; later Elisha also separated the water with his cloak.
9. Elisha succeeded Elijah.
10. The men of Jericho reported to Elisha that the water of the city is bad and the land is unfruitful.
11. Elisha told them to bring him a new bowl with salt in it that he used to throw into the spring and it became fresh.
12. On his way to Bethel, small boys jeered at Elisha; he cursed them and bears came out of the woods and tore 42 of the boys.
13. From there, he went on to Mount Carmel and from there he returned to Samaria.

2 Kings 3, Moab Rebels Against Israel
1. Jehoram, son of Ahab, reigned over Israel for 12 years and he did evil in the sight of the Lord.
2. When Ahab died, Mesha, king of Moab, rebelled against the king of Israel.
3. Jehoram marched out of Samaria and mustered all of Israel, Judah, and Edom to fight Moab; but on the way they ran out of water for the men and the animals.
4. The three kings sought out Elisha, and Elisha asked for a musician.
5. As the musician played, a dry stream bed became full and Elisha said the Moabites will be given into the hands of the three kings.
6. The Moabites came up to fight the three kings, but when they looked at the water, it appeared as blood.
7. The Moabites came down for the spoil thinking the three kings fought with each other and struck each other down.
8. But the Israelites rose and struck the Moabites, till they fled before them.
9. The Israelites stopped every spring of water and felled all the good trees.
10. Finally, the king of Moab took his oldest son and offered him for a burnt offering causing a great wrath on Israel.
11. Israel withdrew and returned to their own land.

Week #52; Wed, Dec 26, 2018, 2 Kings 4-8

Week #52; Wed, Dec 26, 2018, 2 Kings 4:1-8:29

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Elisha succeeded Elijah after he was taken up to Heaven in the whirlwind and Elisha continued to demonstrate the same miraculous powers that Elijah had shown.
2. More evidence is presented on the miraculous events surrounding Elisha during the progression of kings in Israel and Judah.
3. At the point before a miracle occurred, Elisha included a response from the recipient as a precursor to fulfillment; a demonstration of faith.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Kings 4, Elisha and the Widow’s Oil
1. When Elisha responded to the woman whose husband died and the creditor was seeking her two children to be his slave; he said, “What do you have in this house?”
2. The woman said, “Just a jar of oil.”
3. He told her to go outside and borrow empty vessels from all her neighbors, then return and shut the door behind her and her sons.
4. Elisha told her to pour the oil into all the borrowed vessels until all were full; then the oil stopped flowing from her original vessel.
5. Elisha told the woman to go and sell the oil and pay her debts and for her and her sons to live on the rest.
6. Elisha went to Shunem where a wealthy woman lived who urged him to eat food.
7. The woman perceived that Elisha was a holy man of God that continually passed that way.
8. She asked her husband to make a small room on the roof furnished with a bed, table, chair, and a lamp so Elisha could stay there whenever he passed by the woman’s house.
9. When Elisha told his servant, Gehazi, to inquire what the woman needed done, the woman said she had no son and her husband was old.
10. Elisha told the woman that in a year, she would deliver a son and she did.
11. When the child had grown, he complained to his father that he had severe head pain and his father sent him to his mother where he soon died.
12. The woman saddled a donkey and went to Elisha quickly and found him on Mount Carmel.
13. The woman hid her distress from Elisha, but he sent Gehazi with his staff to place it on the woman’s son, but no sound came from her son.
14. When Elisha came into the house, he saw the child lying dead on his bed; he prayed to the Lord and lay on the child and the child became warm.
15. Elisha stretched himself upon him again and this time the child sneezed seven times and opened his eyes; Elisha returned the boy to his mother.
16. When Elisha came to Gilgal, there was a famine in the land.
17. Elisha said to set up a large pot and boil stew for the sons of the prophets, but one of them gathered herbs and wild gourds for the stew.
18. When the men became ill, Elisha poured flour into the pot and it became harmless and nourishing.
19. When a man from Baal-shalishah came bringing bread and ears of grain, Elisha said to give it to the men.
20. When the servant asked how the bread and grain could satisfy a hundred men; Elisha said to serve it and they ate their fill with some left according to the word of the Lord.

2 Kings 5, Naaman Healed of Leprosy
1. When Elisha learned that the king of Syria sent the commander of his army, Naaman, who was a leper, to the king of Israel for healing, he told the king to send him to him.
2. Elisha wanted it known that there is a prophet in Israel; he sent a messenger to Naaman saying, “Go and wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh shall be restored, and you shall be clean.”
3. But Naaman was angry that Elisha did not come out to him and wave his hand and call on the name of the Lord and cure his leprosy; he went away in rage.
4. After his servants spoke with him, he returned and dipped himself seven time in the Jordan as instructed by Elisha, and his flesh was restored like the flesh of a little child, and he was clean.
5. When Naaman was healed, he confessed, “Behold, I know that there is no God in all the earth but in Israel; so, accept now a present from your servant;” however, Elisha refused.
6. Elisha sent Naaman away in peace, but, Gehazi followed Naaman lying to him and accepting two talents of silver and two changes of clothing.
7. But when Gehazi stood before his master, Elisha asked him where he had been.
8. When Gehazi denied his whereabouts to Elisha, he said, “the leprosy of Naaman shall cling to you and to your descendants forever.”

2 Kings 6, The Axe Head Recovered
1. The sons of the prophets told Elisha they wanted to expand their dwelling place to the Jordan and he went with them.
2. In cutting logs, one of the men lost his axe head in the water and he cried out to Elisha that it was borrowed.
3. Elisha asked him, “Where did it fall?”
4. Elisha threw a stick into the place where the axe head fell and made the iron float.
5. The axe head was recovered.
6. The king of Syria was warring with Israel and Elisha kept informing the king of Israel about Syrian movements in frequent warnings.
7. The king of Syria became troubled and asked his servants of this matter; they told him that Elisha informs the king of Israel all that you do.
8. The Syrian king sent his army to Dothan to seize Elisha; Elisha’s servant arose and discovered the presence of the army and reported to Elisha.
9. Elisha prayed to the Lord asking for him to open the eyes of his servant and reveal the horses and chariots of fire all around on the mountains.
10. Elisha also prayed for the Lord to strike the Syrians with blindness when they came down against him; the Lord delivered, and Elisha led them away to Samaria
11. On arriving in Samaria, Elisha prayed to the Lord to open the eyes of the Syrians.
12. The Syrians saw they were amid Samaria and were captives.
13. The king of Israel inquired of Elisha about striking them down, but Elisha told him to give them something to eat; a great feast was prepared.
14. When they were filled, the king of Israel sent them away.
15. The Syrians did not come again on raids into the land of Israel.
16. Afterward, Ben-hadad, king of Syria sent his entire army up to besiege Samaria.
17. There was a great famine in Samaria at the time of the Syrian siege and the king of Israel was in sackcloth.
18. The king was enraged and took his anger out on Elisha, threatening to kill Elisha.

2 Kings 7, Elisha Promises Food
1. Elisha revealed relief was coming the next day with abundance of food at the gate of Samaria.
2. Four lepers were at the entrance of the gate and they decided to give themselves up to the Syrians; but, when they went to the Syrian camp, they found it was completely abandoned.
3. The Lord had made the army of the Syrians hear the sound of chariots and of horses, the sound of a great army, so that they said to one another, “Behold, the king of Israel has hired against us the kings of the Hittites and the kings of Egypt to come against us.”
4. So, the Syrians fled away in the twilight and abandoned their tents, their horses, and their donkeys, leaving the camp as it was, and fled for their lives.
5. The lepers took all that they wanted and went and hid what they took; but, one said, “We are not doing right, punishment will overtake us if we do not tell the king’s household.”
6. The four lepers came to the gate and informed the gatekeepers that the Syrians had fled leaving all the camp as it was.
7. When the king of Israel was told, he suspected a feint withdrawal to lure the people of Israel out into the open land where they could be easily attacked.
8. The king took two horsemen and sent them after the Syrians; the trail was littered with garments that they had thrown away in haste.
9. They went as far as the Jordan without contact with the Syrian army; they returned and told the king.
10. Then the people went out and plundered the camp of the Syrians, trampling the captain in charge of the gate—he never ate of the spoil as prophesized by Elisha.

2 Kings 8, The Shunammite’s Land Restored
1. Elisha told the Shunammite woman whose son Elisha had restored to life to flee because of the coming famine.
2. She sojourned in the land of the Philistines for seven years and returned at the end of the famine.
3. When she went to the king to appeal for her land, Gehazi the servant of the man of God was speaking to the king about Elisha and the woman appeared to make her appeal.
4. Gehazi told the king that this is the woman that Elisha restored her son to life.
5. The king asked the woman and she told him what Elisha did.
6. Then the king appointed an official for her, saying, “Restore all that was hers, together with all the produce of the fields from the day that she left the land until now.”
7. Now Elisha came to Damascus and Ben-hadad the king of Syria was sick.
8. Ben-hadad sent Hazael to Elisha with a present telling him to inquire of the Lord through Elisha if he will recover from his sickness.
9. Elisha said to him, “Go say to him, ‘You shall surely recover,’ but the Lord has shown me he will surely die.”
10. Elisha wept because he knew the evil that will be done to the people of Israel.
11. Elisha said, “The Lord has shown me that you are to be king over Syria.”
12. Then Hazael departed Elisha to report to the king of Syria.
13. Hazael told the king that he would surely recover; but the next day he took the bed cloth and dipped it in water and spread it over his face until the king died.
14. Hazael became king in his place.
15. Jehoram began to reign in Judah for eight years and he did what was evil in the sight of the Lord; yet the Lord was not willing to destroy Judah, for the sake of David his servant and the promise to give a lamp to him and to his sons forever.
16. Edom revolted from the rule of Judah and set up a king of their own.
17. Joram rose and stuck the Edomites but was unsuccessful; Edom ruled under separate rule until Ahaziah took Joram’s place.
18. Ahaziah also walked in the way of the house of Ahab; he went with Joram to make war against Hazael king of Syria at Ramoth-gilead where he was wounded.
19. Ahaziah went down to see Joram because he was sick.

Week #53; Wed, Jan 02, 2019, 2 Kings 9-14

Week #53; Wed, Jan 02, 2019, 2 Kings 9:1-14:29

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Elisha, the prophet, continues to be and instrument of the Lord, working the will of the Lord on the tribes of Israel and Judah.
2. The word of the Lord carryover between Elijah and Elisha is evident following the death of Jezebel pertaining to the disposition of her remains.
3. The record of the kings of Israel and Judah runs relatively parallel with one another, flipping back and forth as the reign flows between kings and the acts of good or evil impact the people and their relationship with the Lord.
4. The Lord gave the people a “savior” (in the form of a good king) when he saw them suffering at the hands of their enemy.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Kings 9, Jehu is King in Israel
1. Elisha, the prophet, sends a son of a prophet, to Ramoth-gilead to find Jehu and anoint him with oil, saying, “Thus says the Lord, I anoint you king over Israel.”
2. The young man told Jehu that he must strike down the house of Ahab his master and cut off all male, bond and free, to avenge on Jezebel the blood of my servants the prophets, and the blood of all the servants of the Lord.
3. So, Jehu conspired against King Joram going to Jezreel where the king lay wounded from this battle with Hazael, king of Syria.
4. Ahaziah, king of Judah had come down to visit Joram when Jehu’s company arrived at Jezreel.
5. As Jehu and his company approached, riders were dispatched to determine if Jehu’s intentions were peaceful; the riders were ordered to fall in behind Jehu as he was driving his chariot furiously to Jezreel.
6. Then Joram king of Israel and Ahaziah king of Judah set out, each in his chariot.
7. When Joram saw Jehu, he said, “Is it peace, Jehu?”
8. Jehu answered, “What peace can there be, so long as the whorings and the sorceries of your mother Jezebel are so many?”
9. As Joram turned and fled, Jehu struck him with an arrow in the heart and he died in his chariot and he was buried on the plot of ground of Naboth the Jezreelite in accordance with the word of the Lord.
10. As Ahaziah the king of Judah saw this, he fled in the direction of Beth-haggan, but Jehu commanded he be shot also; he was wounded in his chariot and he fled to Megiddo where he died and was carried to Jerusalem for burial.
11. When Jehu came to Jezreel, Jezebel inquired if he came in peace, but Jehu told her servants to throw her down and they did, killing her.
12. Jehu ate and drank then commanded his servants to go and bury Jezebel, for she was a king’s daughter; but they only found her head, feet, and hands per the word of the Lord which he spoke by Elijah: “the dogs shall eat the flesh of Jezebel and the corpse of Jezebel shall be as dung on the face of the field in the territory of Jezreel.”

2 Kings 10, Jehu kills Ahab’s Descendants
1. First, Jehu called for the heads of 70 of Ahab’s sons, demanding the people of Samaria bring them to Jezreel; when delivered, Jehu also killed all the house of Ahab as the word of the Lord spoke concerning the house of Ahab to Elijah.
2. Second, Jehu set out for Samaria and on the way he met the 42 relatives of Ahaziah, king of Judah and he slaughtered them, sparing none of them.
3. Third, Jehu met Jehonadab saying “come with me, and see my zeal for the Lord and as they came to Samaria they struck down all that remained to Ahab in Samaria according to the word of the Lord that he spoke to Elijah.
4. Fourth, Jehu called all the prophets of Baal to him pretending to seek to make sacrifice in worship; however, upon their arrival at the house of Baal, the full house was put to the sword and the pillar of Baal was burned along with the house.
5. Fifth, Jehu did all that was commanded by the word of the Lord through the prophets Elijah and Elisha except for failing to destroy the two golden calves that were in Bethel and Dan; he did not turn from the sins of Jeroboam, which made Israel to sin.
6. Sixth, the Lord began to cut off parts of Israel during the 28 years Jehu reigned in Israel.
7. Seventh, Jehoahaz, his son, reigned in his place.

2 Kings 11, Athaliah is ruler in Judah
1. Athaliah, the mother of Ahaziah, killed all the royal family when she discovered that her son was dead; however, Joash was hidden from her by Jehosheba, daughter of King Joram.
2. Jehosheba hid Joash for six years while Athaliah reigned over the land.
3. But, in the seventh year, Jehoiada, the priest, proclaimed Joash king.
4. Athaliah was put to death and Jehoiada made a covenant between the Lord and the king and the people.
5. Then all the people of the land went to the house of Baal and tore it down breaking his altars and his images into pieces while killing Mattan, the priest of Baal, before the altars.
6. Joash took his seat on the throne of the kings.

2 Kings 12, Jehoash become king of Judah and Jehoash Repairs the Temple
1. Jehoash was only seven years old when he began to reign in Judah and he reigned for 40 years in Jerusalem.
2. Jehoash did what was right in the eyes of the Lord; Jehoiada the priest instructed him, but nevertheless, the high places were not taken away and the people continued to sacrifice and make offerings on the high places.
3. Jehoash said to the priests, take all the money of the holy things ‘that is brought into the house of the Lord, the money for which each man is assessed and the money that a man’s heart prompts him to bring into the house of the Lord, and repair the house as needed.
4. But the priests did not do any repairs on the house of the Lord for 23 years during the reign of Jehoash; the king stopped them from taking any more money from the people and required them to hand it over to workmen for the repair of the house.
5. However, no money was spent for the house of the Lord for basins, snuffers, bowls, trumpets, or vessels of gold and silver for that was given to the workmen who were repairing the house without an accounting.
6. The workers dealt honestly; the money from offerings belonged to the priests.
7. At that time Hazael, king of Syria, went up against Gath and took it; when he turned toward Jerusalem, Jehoash, king of Judah took all sacred gifts and all the gold in the treasuries, and sent them to Hazael.
8. Hazael went away from Jerusalem; but, not surprisingly, Joash’s servants arose and struck down Joash and he died.
9. Amaziah, his son, reigned in his place.

2 Kings 13, Jehoahaz, then Jehoash become king of Israel and Elisha Dies
1. Jehoahaz, son of Joau, began his reign in Samaria for 17 years and he did evil in the sight of the Lord following the sins of Jeroboam which he made Israel to sin; the anger of the Lord was kindled against Israel.
2. So, the Lord gave Israel continually into the hand of Hazael, king of Syria and into the hand of Ben-hadad, the son of Hazael.
3. But, Jehoahaz then sought the favor of the Lord; the Lord listened to him and empowered him to get out from under the oppression of the Syrians.
4. Nevertheless, the people did not depart from the sins of the house of Jeroboam, but walked in them (the Asherah remained in Samaria).
5. The army of Jehoahaz was diminished to not more than 50 horsemen and 10 chariots and 10,000 foot soldiers; the rest were destroyed by the king of Syria.
6. When Jehoahaz died, Joash his son reigned in his place while Jehoash reigned in Israel.
7. Jehoash did evil in the sight of the Lord.
8. But when Elisha fell sick, Joash went to see him and wept.
9. Elisha told Joash to shoot an arrow through an open eastward window and to strike the ground with the arrows; Elisha was angry when Joash only struck the ground three times instead of five or six times.
10. Elisha told Joash that the arrow was the Lords arrow of victory and Joash will only be victorious over the Syrians three times instead of making an end of it.
11. Elisha died and was buried; but while under assault of marauding Moabites, another man was being buried and as soon as his body was thrown into the grave of Elisha, and touched his bones, the man revived and stood on his feet.
12. Hazael, king of Syria, oppressed Israel all the days of Jehoahaz; but the Lord was gracious to them and had compassion on them, and he turned toward them, because of his covenant with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob and would not destroy them.
13. When Hazael died, Jehoash took again from Ben-hadad, son of Hazael, the cities he had taken from Jehoahaz; three times Joash defeated him and recovered the cities of Israel.

2 Kings 14, Amaziah is King in Judah
1. Amaziah was 25 years old when he began to reign in Judah; he reigned 29 years in Jerusalem and he did right in the eyes of the Lord.
2. But, the high places were not removed; the people still sacrificed and made offerings on the high places.
3. Amaziah followed what is written in the Book of Moses where the Lord commanded, “not to strike down a father because of his children nor to strike down children because of their father.”
4. So, he let live the children of their father who murdered his father.
5. Then Amaziah challenged Jehoash in battle at Beth-shemesh and Amaziah was defeated and captured by the king of Israel.
6. Jehoash, king of Israel, came to Jerusalem destroying a portion of the wall and seized all the gold and silver, and all the vessels in the House of the Lord, and in the king’s house returning to Samaria with many hostages.
7. Jehoash died and was buried in Samaria and Jeroboam his son reigned in his place.
8. Amaziah lived 15 years in Jerusalem after the death of Jehoash; but he fled to Lachish because of a conspiracy against him; he was put to death.
9. Azariah was made king in place of his father when Azariah was only 16.
10. Meanwhile, Jeroboam II began to reign in Samaria for 41 years and he did evil in the sight of the Lord; but, the Lord saw that the affliction of Israel was very bitter for there was none left to help Israel.
10. The Lord saved them by the hand of Jeroboam to keep Israel from being blotted out from under heaven.
11. When Jeroboam died, Zechariah his son reigned in his place.

Week #54; Wed, Jan 09, 2019, 2 Kings 15-19

Week #54; Wed, Jan 09, 2019, 2 Kings 15:1-19:37

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The extent of the Lord’s touch extends fully to all individuals in detail as illustrated by leprosy given to Azariah for his lifetime, although he did what was right, he did not take away the high places where the people sacrificed and made offerings to other gods (even Moses was stricken with leprosy temporarily).
2. Also, King Zechariah did evil in the sight of the Lord making Israel to sin and he was struck down by Shallum who ruled in his place.
3. Consequences for failure to comply with God’s will, were dispensed by the justice of the Lord.
4. Much turmoil and transition took place in the kingdoms of Judah and Israel; one conspiracy was followed by another.
5. Because the people of Israel had sinned against the Lord, feared other gods, and walked in the customs of other nations, they fell to the Assyria and were exiled from Samaria.
6. Judah under the rule of Hezekiah was faithful to the Lord and was miraculously spared from the hands of the Assyrians.
7. Hezekiah’s prayer of lament brought power from the Lord through deployment of the “angel of the Lord” (note how the Lord states that His current action on behalf of Judah was planned from old what now He brings to pass . . . He knows our sitting down and our going out and coming in . . .).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Kings 15, Azariah Reigns in Judah
1. Although Azariah of Judah did what was right, the Lord touched Azariah giving him leprosy for failing to take away the high places where people sacrificed and made offerings to other gods.
2. So also, King Zechariah of Israel was brought to justice by a conspiracy from his son, Shallum, for doing what was evil in the sight of the Lord as his fathers had done and made Israel to sin.
3. Shallum was then struck down by Menahem who reigned and also evil in the sight of the Lord; he exacted 50 shekels of silver from the wealthy men of Israel to pay Pul, the king of Assyria when he came against the land.
4. Pekahiah, son of Menahem, reigned over Israel in Samaria for two years doing what was evil in the eyes of the Lord; he was struck down by Pekah, who reigned in his place.
5. Pekah reigned for twenty years in Israel and did evil in the eyes of the Lord; Hoshea conspired against him and struck him down.
6. Jotham began to reign in Judah and he did what was right in the eyes of the Lord; but the high places were not removed so Syria was sent by the Lord against Judah.

2 Kings 16, Ahaz Reigns in Judah
1. Ahaz began to reign in Judah at age 20 for 16 years in Jerusalem; he did not do what was right in the eyes of the Lord (he sacrificed his son as an offering on the high places).
2. Ahaz was besieged by Rezin, king of Syria and Pekah, king of Israel but they could not conquer him.
3. Ahaz sent the king of Assyria silver and gold; Assyria then took Damascus captive and killed Rezin.
4. Ahaz went to Damascus to meet Tiglath-pileser, king of Assyria and discovered the altar that was there.
5. Ahaz constructed a model of the Assyrian altar and sent it to Uriah the priest to replicate.
6. Ahaz performed burnt offerings on the new altar that supplanted the altar in the house of the Lord.
7. Ahaz’s son Hezekiah reigned in his place.

2 Kings 17, The Fall of Israel
1. Hoshea reigned in Samaria over Israel for 9 years doing what was evil in the eyes of the Lord.
2. Hoshea was attacked by Shalmaneser king of Assyria; he paid tribute and became his vassal.
3. Shalmaneser found treachery in Hoshea and shut him up and bound him in prison.
4. Shalmaneser then invaded all the land and came to Samaria, besieging it for three years
5. When Shalmaneser captured Samaria, he carried the Israelites away to Assyria.
6. This occurred because the people of Israel had sinned against the Lord walking in the customs of the other nations doing things that were not right.
7. The people built high places in all cities and set up pillars and Asherim; they made offerings on all the high places and served idols.
8. The Lord warned Israel and Judah to turn from their evil ways and keep his commandments.
9. But Israel would not listen; they made an Asherah and served Baal (they burned their sons and daughters as offerings, used divination and omens, and sold themselves to do evil in the sight of the Lord).
10. The Lord removed them out of His sight.
11. Only Judah was left, but they too walked in the customs that Israel had introduced.
12 The Lord removed Judah out of His sight too.
13. The king of Assyria brought people and placed them in the cities of Samaria instead of the people of Israel, but the Lord sent lions among them.
14. The people of Israel would not listen to the Lord and they did according to their former manner.

2 Kings 18, Hezekiah Reigns in Judah
1. Hezekiah, the son of Ahaz began to reign in Judah at age 25 for 29 years in Jerusalem doing what was right in the eyes of the Lord.
2. Hezekiah removed all the high places and broke the pillars and cut down the Asherah.
3. Hezekiah trusted in the Lord keeping His commandments and the Lord was with him.
4. Hezekiah rebelled against the Assyrians and would not serve them; he struck down the Philistines as far as Gaza.
5. Hoshea, king of Israel fought against Assyria for three years but it was taken.
6. Shalmaneser carried the Israelites away to Assyria because they did not obey the voice of the Lord their God.
7. Sennacherib, king of Assyria attacked Judah and took the fortified cities causing Hezekiah to say to him, “I have done wrong; withdraw from me. Whatever you impose on me I will bear.”
8. Sennacherib required 300 talents of silver and 30 talents of gold which Hezekiah gave him.
9. Sennacherib sent his army to Jerusalem taunting them saying that the Lord will not be able to deliver them.
10. The people were silent.

2 Kings 19, Isaiah Reassures Hezekiah
1. Hezekiah appealed to the prophet Isaiah.
2. The Lord told Isaiah that Hezekiah should not be afraid, the Assyrians will be given a spirit, so that they shall hear a rumor and return to their own land and be made to fall on their own sword by their own hand.
3. Hezekiah received another threatening message from Sennacherib but went to the house of the Lord and prayed while sending Eliakim to the prophet Isaiah.
4. Hezekiah laments earnestly before the Lord and Isaiah prophesizes Sennacherib’s fall.
5. That night an angel of the Lord went out and struck down 185,000 in the camp of the Assyrians (Ex. 12:23 and 2 Sam. 24:16 also give rise to expanded thought).
6. Sennacherib departed and went home and lived at Nineveh where his sons struck him down and Esarhaddon his son reigned in his place.

Week #55; Wed, Jan 16, 2019, 2 Kings 20-25

Week #55; Wed, Jan 16, 2019, 2 Kings 20:1:1-25:30

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Hezekiah was faithful, whole-hearted, and he did what was good in the sight of the Lord.
2. Based on Hezekiah’s prayer when he was severely ill, the Lord granted him 15 additional years to live.
3. But Hezekiah had a weakness of being too transparent, especially with a visiting Babylonian envoy.
4. The brutal fall of Judah led to their exile to Babylon.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Kings 20, King Hezekiah is Deathly Ill
1. Hezekiah was sick and dying but his prayer for healing was very powerful and the Lord heard him.
2. Although Isaiah told Hezekiah that he should “get his house in order, for you shall die; you shall not recover” the Lord was moved to reconsider.
3. Hezekiah’s appeal was based on his faithfulness, whole heart, and doing what was good in the sight of the Lord; he wept bitterly.
4. The Lord heard his prayer and saw his tears and he decided to heal Hezekiah.
5. The Lord commanded Hezekiah to go up to the House of the Lord on the third day and he added 15 years to his life; the Lord delivered him and the city out of the hands of the Assyrians for David’s sake.
6. Additionally, Isaiah told Hezekiah a sign from the Lord will show that he will do the thing that he promised; Hezekiah was given a choice of making the shadow go forward 10 steps or backwards 10 steps.
7. Hezekiah said, “Let it go backwards 10 steps.”
8. The Lord brought the shadow backwards 10 steps to show Hezekiah that the Lord would keep his promise.
9. Hearing Hezekiah was sick, Merodach-baladan the son of Baladan, king of Babylon, sent envoys with letters and a present to Hezekiah.
10. Hezekiah welcomed them and showed them all the treasures in his house; there was nothing Hezekiah did not show them.
11. Then Isaiah came to Hezekiah and asked him what happened and what they saw.
12. Hezekiah said everything was shown to them.
13. Isaiah told Hezekiah, “Hear the word of the Lord: Behold, the days are coming, when all that is in your house, and that which your fathers have stored up till this day, shall be carried to Babylon. Nothing shall be left, says the Lord. Your sons shall be eunuchs in the palace of the king of Babylon.”
14. Hezekiah said, “Why not, if there will be peace and security in my days.”
15. Hezekiah was known for having made the pool and the conduit bringing water into the city.

2 Kings 21, Manasseh Reigns in Judah
1. Manasseh was only 12 years when he began to reign in Judah; he reigned for 55 years.
2. He did evil in the sight of the Lord rebuilding the high places his father Hezekiah had destroyed; erected altars for Baal; made an Asherah; worshiped all the host of heaven and served them; built altars in the house of the Lord including altars for the host of heaven in the two courts of the house of the Lord; he burned his son as an offering; used fortune-telling and omens; and he dealt with mediums and necromancers.
3. Manasseh led the people astray to do greater evil than the nations had done whom the Lord destroyed before the people of Israel.
4. He ignored the promises of the Lord to follow him according to the Law that Moses commanded them.
5. The Lord, the God of Israel said, “Behold, I am bringing upon Jerusalem and Judah such disaster that the ears of everyone who hears of it will tingle . . . I will forsake the remnant of my heritage and give them into the hand of their enemies, they shall become prey and a spoil to all their enemies because they have done evil and provoked me to anger.”
6. Amon, Manasseh’s son, reigned in his place; he reigned for 2 years in Jerusalem doing what was evil in the sight of the Lord like his father Manasseh had done.
7. Amon abandoned the Lord and his servants conspired against him putting him to death.
8. But the people of the land struck down all those who had conspired against King Amon and made Josiah his son king in his place.

2 Kings 22, Josiah Reigns in Judah
1. Josiah was 8 years old when he began to reign; he reigned for 33 years in Jerusalem doing right in the eyes of the Lord.
2. Josiah followed the way of David and did not stray from it.
3. Josiah rebuilt the temple giving all the money that had been collected from the people to the workmen without an accounting, for they dealt honestly.
4. Hilkiah the high priest found the Book of the Law in the house of the Lord.
5. When Josiah heard the words of the Book of the Law, he tore his clothes and told his servants to inquire of the Lord and the people.
6. Josiah knew the wrath of the Lord was kindled against them, because his fathers have not obeyed the words of this book.
7. He commanded Hilkiah the high priest and his servants to inquire of the Lord.
8. They went to Huldah the prophetess in Jerusalem and she said, “the Lord will bring disaster to this place and its inhabitants because they have made offerings to other gods, provoking him to anger; his wrath will be kindled against this place and it will not be quenched.”
9. But say to the king of Judah, “Because your heart was penitent, and you humbled yourself before the Lord, I have heard you, declares the Lord; your eyes shall not see all the disaster that I will bring upon this place.”

2 Kings 23, Josiah’s Reforms
1. Josiah gathered all the elders of Judah and Jerusalem together and he read in their hearing all the words of the Book of the Covenant that had been found in the house of the Lord.
2. The king made a covenant before the Lord, to walk after the Lord and to keep his commandments and his testimonies and his statutes with all his heart and all his soul, to perform the words of this covenant that were written in this book and all the people joined in the covenant.
3. The king commanded Hilkiah the high priest, the priests of the second order, and the keepers of the threshold to bring out of the temple of the Lord all the vessels made for Baal, for Asherah, and for all the host of heaven.
4. He burned them outside Jerusalem in the fields of the Kidron and carried their ashes to Bethel.
5. He deposed the priest whom the kings of Judah had ordained to make offerings in the high places at the cities of Judah and around Jerusalem; those also who burned incense to Baal, to the sun and the moon and the constellations and all the host of the heavens; he defiled all places of worship to other gods set up by his fathers—they were pulled down and burned reducing them to dust.
6. He removed the shrines in the cities of Samaria, and he sacrificed all the priests of the high places who were there, on the altars, and burned human bones on them.
7. Josiah returned to Jerusalem and restored the Passover as written in the Book of the Covenant for the first time since the judges who judged Israel; it was the 18th year of King Josiah.
8. Josiah put away all the mediums and the necromancers, the household gods, the idols, and all the abominations that were seen in the land of Judah and in Jerusalem, that he might establish the words of the law that were written in the book that Hilkiah the priest found in the house of the Lord.
9. Before him there was no king like him, who turned to the Lord with all his heart and with all his soul and with all his might, nor did any like him arise after him.
10. Pharaoh Neco king of Egypt went up to the king of Assyria to the river Euphrates, King Josiah went to meet him, and Pharaoh Neco killed him at Megiddo, as soon as he saw him.
11. The people of the land took Jehoahaz the son of Josiah and anointed him king in his father’s place; he was 23 years old when he began to reign for 3 months in Jerusalem doing evil in the sight of the Lord.
12. Pharaoh Neco put him in bonds that he might not rule in Jerusalem; he made Eliakim king in the place of Josiah his father; he gave him the name of Jehoiakim and took him to Egypt where he died.
13. Jehoiakim taxed the people to give the money to Pharaoh Neco; Jehoiakim was 25 years old when he began reigning for 11 years in Jerusalem doing what was evil in the sight of the Lord.

2 Kings 24, Jehoiakim Reigns in Judah
1. Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came up, and Jehoiakim became his servant for 3 years.
2. When he rebelled against him, the Lord sent the Chaldeans, Syrians, Moabites and Ammonites against Judah to destroy it according to the word of the Lord.
3. It appears that this came upon Judah at the command of the Lord, to remove them out of his sight, for the sins of Manasseh, according to all that he had done and the innocent blood he had shed.
4. Jehoiachin his son reigned in his place when he was 18 years old; he reigned for 3 months in Jerusalem doing evil in the sight of the Lord.
5. Babylon began to siege Jerusalem and Jehoiachin gave himself up to Nebuchadnezzar.
6. Nebuchadnezzar took all the treasures of the king’s house and the temple (cutting the vessels of the temple into pieces) and all the people except the poorest.
7. Nebuchadnezzar made Mattaniah, Jehoiachin’s uncle, king in his place, and changed his name to Zedekiah.
8. Zedekiah was 21 years old when he became king; he reigned 11 years doing what was evil in the sight of the Lord.

2 Kings 25, Fall and Captivity of Judah
1. Nebuchadnezzar laid siege against Jerusalem until the 11 year of the reign of Zedekiah; there was no food for the people of the land.
2. The king and all the men of war fled by night by the way of a breach and the gate in the double wall, but the Chaldeans were all around the city and they pursued the king until he was overtaken at Jericho.
3. They slaughtered the sons of Zedekiah before the king and put out the eyes of Zedekiah and bound him in chains; they then took him captive to Babylon.
4. King Nebuchadnezzar went to Jerusalem and burned down all the houses and took those that remained in the city into exile; a few of the poorest were left to be vinedressers and plowmen.
5. All the bronze pillars, stands, the sea, pots, shovels, snuffers, dishes, and vessels were broken into pieces and carried to Babylon.
6. Many people that remained in the land were taken to the king of Babylon where he struck them down.
7. So, Judah was taken into exile out of its land.
8. Nebuchadnezzar appointed Gedaliah governor over the people that remained in the land; Gedaliah told them to live in the land and serve the king of Babylon and it shall be well with them.
9. Gedaliah and those with him were struck down by Ishmael and ten of his men; the rest fled to Egypt.
10. Jehoiachin was released from prison when Evil-merodaoh, King of Babylon, in the year he began to reign.
11. Jehoiachin was given an allowance according to his needs as long as his lived.

Week #56; Wed, Jan 23, 2019, 1 Chronicles 1-6

Week #56; Wed, Jan 23, 2019, 1 Chronicles 1:1-6:81

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The genealogy of the descendants from Adam to the written proclamation by Cyrus, king of Persia, is documented in 1st and 2nd Chronicles.
2. Samuel and Kings are confirmed by Chronicles
3. Because of the high number of descendant relationships described in Chronicles from Adam through David, there is value in concentrating on just the names tied to the “Bloodline of Christ.” See: Alfred T. Eade, “The Expanded Panorama Bible Study Course: From the Creation of the Angels to the New Jerusalem.”
4. The Gospel also gains reinforcement through God’s creation of one man through one blood line for all nations; all being descended from Adam.
5. See: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogies_in_the_Bible and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genealogies_in_the_Bible#Family_tree_of_Abraham for useful charts and maps that highlight the genealogy of Christ from Adam (with notes on important connections).
6. The dwelling places, pasturelands, and settlements were given borders by tribe.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Chronicles 1, Adam to Abram (Abraham); Abraham to Jacob
1. Adam’s descendants lead to Abraham and Jacob.
2. Abraham’s descendants (Israel and Ishmael) lead to wide divisions that give rise to conflict between the two lines that continues today.
3. The descendants of Israel lead to salvation through Jesus Christ, the Messiah.

1 Chronicles 2, Genealogy of David
1. Descendants of Joseph (Israel) lead to the ten tribes of Israel (Reuben, Simon, Levi, Issachar, Zebulun, Gad, Asher, Dan, Naphtali, Joseph) and two tribes of Judah (Judah and Benjamin); twelve tribes total.
2. Jesse fathered seven sons including David
3. David’s descendants lead to Christ Jesus.

1 Chronicles 3, David’s Descendants
1. David’s descendants lead to Solomon (and the construction of the Temple of the Lord).

1 Chronicles 4, Descendants of Judah; Descendants of Simeon
1. Many descendants were grouped by the kind of work they performed (linen workers, potters, etc.)
2. Families were often large; often over 20.

1 Chronicles 5, Descendants of Reuben; Descendants of Gad; Descendants of the Half-Tribe of Manasseh
1. Reuben was the firstborn of Israel, but he defiled his father’s couch and his birthright was given to Joseph.
2. Reuben, Gad, and the half tribe of Manasseh were taken into exile by Assyria; they broke faith with the God of their fathers and whored after the gods of the peoples of the land, whom God had destroyed before them.

1 Chronicles 6, Descendants of Levi
1. Azariah served as priest in the house that Solomon built in Jerusalem.
2. Levites were appointed for all the service of the tabernacle of the house of God.

Week #57; Wed, Jan 30, 2019, 1 Chronicles 7-13

Week #57; Wed, Jan 30, 2019, 1 Chronicles 7:1-13:14



PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The genealogy of the descendants from Adam to the written proclamation by Cyrus, king of Persia, is documented in 1st and 2nd Chronicles.
2. Samuel and Kings are confirmed by Chronicles
3. Because of the high number of descendant relationships described in Chronicles from Adam through David, there is value in concentrating on just the names tied to “Bloodline of Christ.”
4. The Gospel also gains reinforcement through following God’s creation of one man through one blood line for all nations; all being descended from Adam (Book by Alfred T. Eade, “The Expanded Panorama Bible Study Course” pertains).
5. See: Rose Book of Bible Charts, Maps, and Time Lines (10th Anniversary Expanded Edition) for useful charts and maps that highlight the genealogy of Jesus from Adam (with legend on important connections).
6. The dwelling places, pasturelands, and settlements were given borders by tribe.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Chronicles 7, Descendants of Issachar, Benjamin, Naphtali, Manasseh, Ephraim, and Asher
1. Four sons descended from Issachar (kinsmen included 87,000 mighty warriors).
2. Three sons descended from Benjamin (kinsmen included 59,434 mighty warriors).
3. Four sons descended from Naphtali.
4. Two sons descended from Manasseh.
5. Four sons descended from Ephraim.
6. Four sons descended from Asher (kinsmen included 26,000 mighty warriors).

1 Chronicles 8, Descendants of Saul
1. Ner was the father of Kish, Kish of Saul, Saul of Jonathan, Malchi-shua, Abinadab and Eshbaal.
2. All these were Benjamites.

1 Chronicles 9, Genealogy of the Returned Exiles and Saul’s Genealogy Revisited
1. Judah was taken into exile in Babylon because of their breach of faith.
2. The first to dwell again in their cities were Israel, the priests, the Levites, and the temple servants.
3. Some of the people of Judah, Benjamin, Ephraim, and Manasseh lived in Jerusalem.
4. Ner was the father of Kish, Kish of Saul, Saul of Jonathan, Malchi-shua, Abinadab and Eshbaal.

1 Chronicles 10, The Death of Saul and His Sons
1. Now the Philistines fought against Israel, and the men of Israel fled before the Philistines and fell slain on Mount Gilboa.
2. And the Philistines overtook Saul and his sons, and the Philistines struck down Jonathan and Abinadab and Malchi-shua, the sons of Saul.
3. The archers found Saul and wounded him; Saul said to his armor-bearer, “Draw your sword and thrust me through with it, lest these uncircumcised come and mistreat me.”
4. His armor-bearer would not, so Saul fell upon his own sword and died.
5. The army abandoned their cities and fled and the Philistines came and lived in them.
6. So, Saul died for his breach of faith.
7. He broke faith with the Lord in that he did not keep the command of the Lord, and he also consulted a medium, seeking guidance.
8. He did not seek guidance from the Lord.
9. Therefore, the Lord put him to death and turned the kingdom over to David the son of Jesse.

1 Chronicles 11, David Anointed King; David Takes Jerusalem; and David’s Mighty Men
1. All Israel gathered to David at Hebron saying, “Behold, we are your bone and flesh. In times past, even when Saul was king, it was you who led out and brought in Israel. And the Lord your God said to you, ‘You shall be shepherd of my people Israel, and you shall be prince over my people Israel.'”
2. All the elders of Israel came to the king at Hebron, and David made a covenant with them at Hebron before the Lord.
3. And they anointed David king over Israel, according to the word of the Lord by Samuel.
4. David and all Israel went to Jerusalem where the Jebusites were inhabiting the land.
5. The Jebusites told David, “You will not come in here.”
6. David told all of Israel, “Whoever strikes the Jebusites first shall be chief and commander.”
7. Joab (son of Zeruiah) went up first, so he became chief.
8. David lived in the stronghold and it became known as the city of David; he rebuilt the city and he became greater and greater.
9. There were 30 in David’s mighty men and three were greatest: Jashobeam, Eleazar, and Shammah (2 Samuel 23:11 pertains); Jashobeam was chief of the three.
10. Abishai and Benaiah were also mighty men of the 30 but they did not attain to the three.
11. Note that Uriah the Hittite is listed among the 30 mighty men of David; Uriah’s wife was Bathsheba.

1 Chronicles 12, The Mighty Men Join David
1. Saul’s mighty men joined David at Ziklag; other men came to David to help him until there was a great army, like an army of God.
2. Overall, 340,000 mighty men arrayed in battle order came together to make David king; there was joy in Israel and a three day feast was prepared to mark the unity of Israel under David.

1 Chronicles 13, The Ark Brought from Kiriath-Jearim
1. All the commanders of the assembly were consulted by David and he said to the assembly, “If it seems good to you and from the Lord our God, let us send abroad to our brothers who remain in all the lands of Israel, as well as to the priests and Levites in the cities that have pasturelands, that they may be gathered to us. Then let us bring again the ark of our God to us, for we did not seek it in the days of Saul.”
2. All agreed so David assembled all Israel to bring the ark of God from Kiriath-jearim to Jerusalem.
3. The ark of God is called by the name of the Lord who sits enthroned above the cherubim.
4. They carried the ark of God in a new cart driven by Uzzah and Ahio.
5. David and all Israel were rejoicing before God with all their might, with song and lyres, harps, tambourines, cymbals and trumpets.
6. When they came to the threshing floor of Chidden, the oxen stumbled and Uzzah put out his hand to take hold of the ark.
7. The anger of the Lord was kindled against Uzzah, and he struck him down because he put out his hand to the ark, and he died there before God.
8. David was very angry but was very afraid of God that day saying, “How can I bring the ark of God home to me?”
9. So David took it aside to the house of Obed-edom the Gittite where it remained for three months.
10. The Lord blessed the household of Obed-edom and all that he had.

Week #58; Wed, Feb 06: 1 Chronicles 14–21

Week #58; Wed, Feb 06: 1 Chronicles 14:1–21:30

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. While David’s wife (Saul’s daughter), Michal had no child to the day of her death, he had sons in Hebron (6) and more children in Jerusalem (13).
2. Here we see where nothing the Lord does is carried out in isolation, for the bloodline of Christ flows by His design through David to Solomon with much orchestrating to produce a good and glorious plan.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Chronicles 14, David’s Wives and Children
1. David took more wives and fathered 13 children in Jerusalem including Solomon.
2. It appears God is guiding the paths of rulers, righteous and unrighteous, to fulfill His purpose in Israel.
3. When the Philistines made a raid in the Valley of Rephaim, David went out against them.
4. He inquired of God, “Shall I go up against the Philistines?
5. God said, “Go up, and I will give them into your hand.”
6. David struck them down and burned their gods.
7. But, the Philistines made another raid in the valley.
8. David again inquired of God and God said to him, “Do not go up after them; go around and come against them opposite the balsam trees and when you hear the sound of marching in the top of the trees, then go out to battle for God has gone out before you to strike down the army of the Philistines.”
9. David did as God commanded him, and they struck down the Philistine army.
10. Fame of David went out into all lands, and the Lord brought the fear of him upon all nations.

1 Chronicles 15, The Ark is Brought to Jerusalem
1. David built houses for himself in the city of David while preparing a place for the ark of God in a tent.
2. David demanded that no one but the Levites carry the ark of God for they are chosen to carry it and minister to him forever.
3. David called all Israel at Jerusalem to bring up the ark of the Lord to its place, which he had prepared for it; 6 Levite chiefs and 852 of their brothers, plus 8 Levite priests were told to consecrate themselves so they may carry the ark of God.
4. David said, “Because you did not carry it the first time, the Lord our God broke out against us, because we did not seek him according to the rule.”
5. The Levites carried the ark of God on their shoulders with the poles, as Moses had commanded according to the word of the Lord.
6. David also commanded the chiefs of the Levites to appoint their brothers as the singers who should play loudly on musical instruments, on harps, lyres, and cymbals, to raise sounds of joy.
7. The priests should blow trumpets before the ark of God as the ark of the covenant of the Lord was brought up from the house of Obed-edom with rejoicing.
8. God helped the Levites who were carrying the ark of the covenant of the Lord, they sacrificed seven bulls and seven rams.
9. David was clothed with a robe of fine linen and a linen ephod.
10. As the ark of the covenant of the Lord came to the city of David, Michal the daughter of Saul looked out of the window and saw King David dancing and rejoicing, and she despised him in her heart.

1 Chronicles 16, The Ark is Placed in a Tent
1. They brought in the ark of God and set it inside the tent that David had pitched for it, and they offered burnt offering and peace offerings before God.
2. David blessed the people in the name of the Lord and distributed to all Israel, both men and women, a loaf of bread, a portion of meat, and a cake of raisins.
3. David appointed some of the Levites as ministers before the ark of the Lord, to invoke, to thank, and to praise the Lord, the God of Israel.
4. David’s song of thanks includes praise, glory, rejoicing, strength of the Lord, wonderous works, miracles, judgments, commandments, covenant with Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, and Israel, salvation, inheritance, splendor, majesty, offerings, exultation, joy, steadfast love, delivery, and blessings.
5. David assigned Asaph and his brothers to minister regularly before the ark as each day required; others were assigned as gatekeepers and to offer burnt offerings to the Lord regularly morning and evening–to do all that is written in the Law of the Lord that he commanded Israel.
6. Then all the people departed each to his house, and David went home to bless his household.

1 Chronicles 17, The Lord’s Covenant with David
1. David said to Nathan the prophet, “Behold, I dwell in a house of cedar, but the ark of the covenant of the Lord is under a tent.”
2. Nathan said to David, “Do all that is in your heart, for God is with you.”
3. The same night the word of the Lord came to Nathan, “Go and tell David, ‘It is not you who will build me a house to dwell in. For I have not lived in a house since the day I brought up Israel to this day, but I have gone from tent to tent from dwelling to dwelling. In all places where I have moved with all Israel, did I speak a word with any of the judges of Israel, whom I commanded to shepherd my people, saying, “Why have you not built me a house of cedar?”‘
4. Nathan also told David that the Lord said, “I will raise up your offspring after you, one of your own sons, and I will establish his kingdom. He shall build a house for me, and I will establish his throne forever.”
5. David prayed to the Lord to let the word that was spoken be fulfilled, to establish God’s name and house in Israel forever and be blessed.

1 Chronicles 18, David Defeats His Enemies
1. Then David defeated the Philistines and he took Gath and its villages out of the hand of the Philistines.
2. He defeated the Moabites, Zobah-Hamath, Syrians, Edomites, Ammonites, and Amalek; the Lord gave victory to David wherever he went.
3. David dedicated all the silver and gold that was carried off from other nations to the Lord.
4. So David reigned over all Israel, and he administered justice and equity to all his people using a strong administration of commanders, priests, and secretarial positions; his son’s were chief officials in the service of the king.

1 Chronicles 19, The Ammonites Disgrace David’s Men
1. When Nahash, the king of the Ammonites died, David wanted to deal kindly with Hanan, his son, since Nahash was kind with him; but because fear and suspicion was present, David’s men were disgraced when they went to console him.
2. David sent Joab and his brother Abishai to engage the Amonites who were helped by the Syrians.
2. The Ammonites and Syrians both fled from David’s army when he drew up battle lines with them; the Syrians no longer were willing to save the Ammonites and they made peace with David becoming subjects to him.

1 Chronicles 20, Rabbah Captured
1. In the spring, Joab led the army against the Ammonites and struck down Rabbah taking the kings crown of gold.
2. David took the crown and placed it on his head.
3. The same was done to all the cities of the Ammonites and then David and all the people returned to Jerusalem.
4. Afterwards, war arose with the Philistines at Gezer where they were subdued by David’s army.
5. Conflict with the Philistines arose other times and each time David’s men were victors.
6. Goliath’s giant brother, Lahmi, was also slain; he had six fingers and six toes on each hand and foot.

1 Chronicles 21, Pestilence Comes With David’s Census
1. When Satan incited David to number Israel, he sent Joab and the commanders of the army to go number all of Israel.
2. Even at Joab’s resistance, David prevailed and demanded the count to take place.
3. Joab even withheld count of Levi and Benjamin because the count was abhorrent to Joab.
4. When Joab reported the results of the count there were 1,100,000 men who drew the sword in all Israel and 470,000 men who drew the sword in Judah.
5. God was displeased by the counting and he struck Israel.
6. David said to God, “I have sinned greatly in that I have done this thing. But now, please take away the iniquity of your servant.”
7. God spoke to Gad, David’s seer saying, “Say to David, ‘Three thing I offer you; choose one of them, that I may do to you.'”
8. Gad told David he had a choice of; 1) three years of famine, 2) three months of devastation by your foes, or 3) three days of pestilence on the land.
9. David chose pestilence while counting on the mercy of the Lord.
10. David appealed to God when he saw the destruction on the land, asking God for his hand to turn against him rather than to plague the people.

Week #59; Wed, Feb 13: 1 Chronicles 22–28

Week #59; Wed, Feb 13: 1 Chronicles 22:1–28:21

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The angel of the Lord commanded Gad, David’s seer, to say to David, “Go and raise up an altar to the Lord on Ornan’s threshing room floor.
2. Once David paid 600 shekels of gold to acquire Ornan’s threshing floor, land and offerings (oxen and grain), he built an altar to the Lord.
3. When David presented burnt offerings and peace offerings and called on the Lord, the Lord answered him with fire from heaven upon the altar of burnt offering.
4. KEY POINT (per end of chapter 21): David declared, “Here shall be the house of the Lord God and here the altar of burnt offering for Israel.”

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Chronicles 22, David Prepares to Build the Temple
1. Key to building the house of the Lord was the bringing about of the altar and God’s answer by fire affirming to David that He was ready to have a foothold on the land.
2. So, David commanded to gather together the workers and materials to prepare for building the house of God.
3. David knew that his son, Solomon, was young and inexperienced, and the house of the Lord must be exceedingly magnificent, of fame and glory throughout all the land.
4. David provided much quality material in great quantity before his death.
5. Then David called for Solomon his son and charged him to build a house for the Lord, the God of Israel.
6. David said to Solomon, “My son, I had it in my heart to build a house to the name of the Lord my God; but the word of the Lord came to me, saying, ‘You have shed much blood and have waged great wars and you shall not build a house to my name. Behold, a son shall be born to you who shall be a man of rest. I will give him rest from all his surrounding enemies. His name shall be Solomon; he shall build a house for my name. I will establish his royal throne in Israel forever.'”
7. David told Solomon, “The Lord be with you, so that you may succeed in building the house of the Lord your God. May He grant you discretion and understanding, that when He gives you charge over Israel you may keep the law of the Lord your God. Then you will prosper if you are careful to observe the statutes and the rules that the Lord commanded Moses for Israel. Arise and work! The Lord will be with you.”
8. David also commanded all the leaders of Israel to help Solomon his son and seek the Lord your God, so that the ark of the covenant of the Lord and the holy vessels of God may be brought into a house built for the name of the Lord.

1 Chronicles 23, David Organized the Levites
1. When David was old and full of days, he made Solomon his son king over Israel.
2. Of the 38,000 Levite men twenty years old and upward, David assigned 24,000 to work in the house of the Lord, 6,000 were assigned as judges, 4,000 were assigned gatekeepers, and 4,000 were assigned as musicians.
3. David organized them by divisions corresponding to the sons of Levi: Gershon, Kohath, and Merari.
4. Duties for making offerings before the Lord, ministering to him, pronouncing blessing in his name forever, care of the courts and the chambers, the cleansing of all that is holy, and keeping charge of the tent of meeting and the sanctuary, and any work for the service of the house of God were all allocated by David.

1 Chronicles 24, David Organized the Priests
1. David organized the priests according to the appointed duties in their service.
2. Lots were used to delegate priestly duties to the sons of Aaron: Nadab, Abihu, Eleazar, and Ithamar.

1 Chronicles 25, David Organized the Musicians
1. David and the chiefs of the service also set apart for the service the sons of Asaph, and of Heman, and of Jeduthun who prophesied with lyres, harps, and cymbals.
2. 288 were skillful as musicians and singers.

1 Chronicles 26, David Organized the Gatekeepers
1. The gatekeepers were men of great ability and lots were cast for their gates on the north, south, east and west.
2. Watches were assigned for each gate.
3. Treasurers and other officials were assigned over the spoils won in battles that were dedicated for the maintenance of the house of the Lord.
4. All dedicated gifts were given oversight for the affairs of the king.

1 Chronicles 27, David Organized the Military
1. Twelve divisions of 24,000 under commanders of thousands and hundreds served the king in all matters concerning each division.
2. Stewards of the king’s property included the treasuries across the land, works in the field, vineyards, produce, wine cellars, stores of olive oil, sycamore trees, herds, camels, donkeys, and other flocks.
3. The leaders of the tribes of Israel are:
1) Reuben–Eliezer
2) Simeon–Shephatiah
3) Levi–Hashabiah
4) Aaron–Zadok
5) Judah–Elihu (one of David’s brothers)
6) Issachar–Omri
7) Zebulun–Ishmaiah
8) Naphtali–Jeremoth
9) Ephraim–Hoshea
10) Half-tribe of Manasseh (West of Jordan, in Israel)–Joel
11) Half-tribe of Manasseh (East of Jordan, in Gilead)–Iddo
12) Benjamin–Jaasiel
13) Dan–Azarel

1 Chronicles 28, David Charges Israel
1. David assembled all the officials of Israel at Jerusalem and said: “Hear me, my brothers and my people, I had it in my heart to build a house of rest for the ark of the covenant of the Lord and for the footstool of our God, and made preparations for building. But God said to me, ‘You may not build a house for my name, for you are a man of war and have shed blood.’ Yet the Lord God of Israel chose me from all my father’s house to be king over Israel forever. For he chose Judah as leader, and in the house of Judah my father’s house, and among my father’s sons he took pleasure in me to make me king over all Israel. The Lord God of Israel has chosen Solomon to sit on the throne of the kingdom of the Lord over Israel. He said to me, ‘It is Solomon your son who shall build my house and my courts, for I have chosen him to be my son, and I will be his father. I will establish his kingdom forever if he continues strong in keeping my commandments and my rules, as he is today.”
2. David charges Solomon to “Know the God of your father and serve him with a whole heart and with a willing mind, for the Lord searches all hearts and understands every plan and thought. If you seek him, he will be found by you, but if you forsake him, he will cast you off forever. The Lord has chosen you to build a house for the sanctuary; be strong and do it.”
3. Then David gave Solomon the plan of the house of the Lord saying, “All this he made clear to me in writing from the hand of the Lord, all the work to be done according to the plan.”

Week #60; Wed, Feb 20: 1 Chronicles 29–2 Chronicles 6

Week #60; Wed, Feb 20: 1 Chronicles 29:1–2 Chronicles 6:42

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. David set the stage for Solomon to utilize the materials provided for building the temple.
2. When the Lord asked Solomon what he should give him, he asked for wisdom and knowledge; God also gave him great riches, possessions, and honor.
3. Solomon built the temple for the Lord, and he also built a royal palace for himself (2:12).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
1 Chronicles 29, Temple Offerings
1. David announced to all the assembly that his son Solomon was chosen by God to build a palace for the Lord God even though he is young and inexperienced.
2. David also announced that he provided the gold, silver, bronze, iron, wood, onyx and other stones, and marble for the house of God.
3. David gave his personal treasure of gold and silver because of his devotion to the house of God.
4. David solicited freewill offerings from the leaders of the tribes, the commanders of thousands and of hundreds, and the officers over the king’s work.
5. David and the people rejoiced because they had given willingly, for with a whole heart they had offered freely to the Lord.
6. So, David blessed the Lord in the presence of all the assembly crediting His greatness, power, glory, victory, and majesty for all that is in the heavens and in the earth.
7. David thanked the Lord and praised Him saying all that has been provided for building God’s house comes from his hand and is his.
8. David prayed for his son Solomon to be given a whole heart that he may keep God’s commandments, testimonies, and statutes, performing all, and that he may build the palace for which David made provisions.
9. The assembly offered sacrifices and burnt offerings to the Lord in abundance for all Israel; they ate and drank before the Lord on that day with great gladness.
10. Solomon was made king and he sat on the throne of the Lord as king in place of David his father.
11. All the people pledged their allegiance to King Solomon; the Lord made Solomon very great in the sight of all Israel and bestowed on him royalty as had not been on any king before him in Israel.
12. David reigned for 40 years and died full of days, riches, and honor.

2 Chronicles 1, Solomon Worships at Gibeon
1. The Lord was with Solomon and made him exceedingly great.
2. Solomon spoke to all Israel and all the assembly went to the high place at Gibeon, for the tent of meeting of God, which Moses the servant of the Lord hade made in the wilderness, was there (except for the ark of God).
3. Solomon went up there to the bronze altar before the Lord, which was at the tent of meeting, and offered 1,000 burnt offerings on it.
4. In that night God appeared to Solomon, and said to him, “Ask what I shall give you.”
5. Solomon said to God, “You have shown great and steadfast love to David my father, and have made me king in his place. Let your word to David my father be now fulfilled, for you have made me king over a people as numerous as the dust of the earth. Give me now wisdom and knowledge to go out and come in before this people, for who can govern this people of yours, which is so great?”
6. God answered Solomon, “Because this was in your heart, and you have not asked possessions, wealth, honor, or the life of those who hate you, and have not even asked long life, but have asked wisdom and knowledge for yourself that you may govern my people over whom I have made you king, wisdom and knowledge are granted to you. I will also give you riches, possessions, and honor, such as none of the kings had who were before you, and none after you shall have the like.”
7. Solomon gathered together 1,400 chariots and 12,000 horsemen; he made silver and gold as common in Jerusalem as stone; and he made cedar as plentiful as the sycamore of the Shephelah.

2 Chronicles 2, Temple Construction Preparations
1. Solomon assigned 70,000 men to bear burdens and 80,000 to quarry in the hill country, and 3,600 to oversee them (153,600).
2. Solomon sent word to Hiram the king of Tyre: As you dealt with my father and sent him cedar to build himself a house to dwell in, so deal with me.
3. In reflecting on his mission, Solomon said, “The house that I am to build will be great, for our God is greater than all gods. But who is able to build him a house, since heaven, even highest heaven, cannot contain him?”
4. Hiram the king of Tyre sent a skilled man, who has understanding, Huram-abi; he is trained to work in gold, silver, bronze, iron, stone, and wood, and in purple, blue, and crimson fabrics and fine lined, and to do all sorts of engraving and execute any design that may be assigned him.
5. In exchange, Solomon sent Hiram woodsmen, wheat, barley, baths of wine, and baths of oil.
6. The timbers cut in Lebanon were brought to Joppa by rafts in the sea for delivery to Jerusalem.

2 Chronicles 3, Solomon Begins Construction
1. Solomon began to build the house of the Lord in Jerusalem on Mount Moriah, where the Lord had appeared to David his father, at the place that David had appointed, on the threshing floor of Ornan the Jebusite.
2. Solomon’s measurements for building the house of God was 60 cubits long, 20 cubits wide, and 120 cubits high; the Most Holy Place was 20 cubits long, and 20 cubits wide.
3. The Most Holy Place contained two cherubim, the veil of blue, purple, and crimson, and two pillars in the front of the temple.

2 Chronicles 4, Temple Furnishings
1. Altar of bronze, 20 by 20 by 10 cubits.
2. Round metal sea, 10 cubits brim to brim and 5 cubits high.
3. Figures of gourds and 12 oxen.
4. Basins, 10.
5. Golden lampstands, 10.
6. Tables, 10.
7. Basins of gold, 100.
8. Court of the priests.
9. Great court.
10. Numerous chains, pots, forks, tongs, snuffers, shovels, fire pans, dishes, pomegranates, latticework, doors, and many other required items (the weight of bronze was not known).
11. Many items were cast in the clay ground between Succoth and Zeredah in great quantities.

2 Chronicles 5, Ark Placed in the Temple
1. When all the work that Solomon did for the house of the Lord was finished, Solomon assembled all the leaders in Jerusalem to bring up the ark of the covenant of the Lord out of the city of David, which is Zion.
2. The Levites took up the ark, the tent of meeting, and all the holy vessels that were in the tent and brought them up.
3. King Solomon and the assembly sacrificed many sheep and oxen, so many, they could not be counted.
4. The priests brought the ark into the inner sanctuary and put it in its place, in the Most Holy Place, underneath the wings of the cherubim.
5. All the Levitical singers with cymbals, harps, lyres, and trumpeters made themselves heard in unison in praise and thanksgiving to the Lord saying, “For he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever.”
6. The glory of the Lord filled the house of God.

2 Chronicles 6, Solomon Blesses the People
1. Solomon said, “Now the Lord has fulfilled his promise that he made. For I have risen in the place of David my father and sit on the throne of Israel, as the Lord promised, and I have built the house for the name of the Lord, the God of Israel. And there I have set the ark, in which is the covenant of the Lord that he made with the people of Israel.”
2. Solomon also stood before the altar of the Lord in the presence of all the assembly of Israel with arms lifted up and kneeling and said, “O Lord, God of Israel, . . . Keep for your servant David my father what you have promised him, saying, ‘You shall not lack a man to sit before me on the throne of Israel, if only your sons pay close attention to their way, to walk in my law as you have walked before me.’
3. Further, Solomon prayed, “And listen to the pleas of your servant and of your people Israel, when they pray toward this place, when you hear, forgive.”
4. Solomon prayed for forgiveness of sin resulting in any defeat, lack of rain, famine, afflictions, and exile; he prayed for restoration from these calamities when the people acknowledge your name and turn from their sin.
5. Solomon prayed for foreigners who come from afar for the sake of your great name and your mighty hand and your outstretched arm and prays toward this house, do for them according to all for which the foreigner calls to you.

Week #61; Wed, Feb 27: 2 Chronicles 7–15

Week #61; Wed, Feb 27: 2 Chronicles 7:1–15:19

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Like the pillar of fire that led the Hebrew people through the desert, God continues to speak and move through fire.
2. The Lord repeats the covenant he made with David to Solomon and promises that disaster awaits him if he abandons the Lord and worships other gods.
3. Solomon’s wealth grew bigger and bigger, there was none like the wealth of Solomon.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Chronicles 7, Fire from Heaven Fills the Temple
1. When Solomon finished his prayer of dedication for the temple, fire came down from heaven and consumed the burnt offering and the sacrifices, and the glory of the Lord filled the temple.
2. The glory of the Lord filled the Lord’s house; even the priests could not enter the house of the Lord.
3. The people bowed down with their faces to the ground and worshiped and gave thanks to the Lord saying, “For he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever.”
4. King Solomon offered 22,000 oxen and 120,000 sheep as an offering for the dedication for the house of God.
5. The people also offered sacrifices with music, trumpets, and praise.
6. At that time Solomon held the feast for seven days, and all Israel with him, from Lebo-hamath to the Brook of Egypt.
7. The dedication of the altar and the feast lasted for seven days each.
8. On the twenty-third day, Solomon sent the people away to their homes, joyful and glad of heart.
9. This marked the successful completion of the house of the Lord and the king’s house at the 23rd day of the 7th month.
10. Then the Lord appeared to Solomon in the night and said to him: “I have heard your prayer (of dedication) and have chosen this place for myself as a house of sacrifice. . . . If my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and urn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.”
11. He also told Solomon, “As for you, if you will walk before me as David your father walked, doing according to all that I have commanded you and keeping my statutes and my rules, then I will establish your royal throne, as I covenanted with David your father, saying, ‘You shall not lack a man to rule Israel.'”
12. But the Lord also cautioned Solomon saying, “If you turn aside and forsake my statutes and my commandments that I have set before you, and go and serve other gods and worship them, I will pluck you up from my land that I have given you, and this house that I have consecrated for my name, I will cast out of my sight.”
13. Disaster awaits if Solomon abandons the Lord.

2 Chronicles 8, Solomon’s Accomplishments
1. After the 20 years of building the house of the Lord and his own house, Solomon rebuilt the cities that Hiram had given to him, and settled the people of Israel in them.
2. Solomon assigned 250 officers that exercised authority over the people.
3. Solomon assigned those who were left in the land whom the people of Israel had not destroyed for forced labor.
4. But the people of Israel were made soldiers and officers.
5. Solomon observed the Sabbaths and the three feasts (Unleavened Bread, Weeks, and Booths) according to the commandment of Moses.
6. Solomon went to Ezion-geber and Eloth on the shore of the sea, in the land of Edom where Hiram sent to him ships and servants who joined his servants that brought 450 talents of gold to King Solomon.

2 Chronicles 9, The Queen of Sheba
1. The queen of Sheba also brought camels, spices, gold, and precious stoned to Solomon in Jerusalem.
2. The queen of Sheba had many questions to test Solomon and he answered all of her questions; there was nothing hidden from Solomon that he could not explain to her.
3. The queen of Sheba was greatly impressed by the wisdom of Solomon, the joy of the people, and all of his wealth.
4. Solomon gave the queen of Sheba all that she wanted and she went back to her own land with her servants.
5. 666 talents of gold came to Solomon in one year which was besides that which the explorers and merchants brought.
6. All the kings of Arabia and the governors of the land brought gold and silver to Solomon.
7. King Solomon excelled all the kings of the earth in riches and wisdom.
8. Solomon had 4,000 stalls for horses and chariots, and 12,000 horsemen, whom he stationed in the chariot cities and with the king of Jerusalem.
9. Solomon ruled over all the kings from the Euphrates to the land of the Philistines and to the border of Egypt.
10. Solomon reigned in Jerusalem of all Israel 40 years and he slept with his fathers; he was buried in the city of David and Rehoboam his son reigned in his place.

2 Chronicles 10, Revolt Against Rehoboam
1. Rehoboam was made king in Shechem and soon Jeroboam the son of Nebat heard of it.
2. Jeroboam returned from Egypt where he was in hiding from Solomon.
3. Jeroboam and all Israel came to Rehoboam saying, “Your father made our yoke heavy; now lighten the hard service of your father and we will serve you.”
4. He said, “Come to me again in three days.”
5. The Rehoboam took counsel with the old men who stood before Solomon asking, “How do you advise me to answer this people?”
6. They told him to be good to the people and please them and they will be your servants.
7. But Rehoboam also took counsel with the young men who he grew up with.
8. They told him to be harsher than his father making their yoke even heavier.
9. Rehoboam took the advice of the young men and made a turn of affairs brought about by God that the Lord might fulfill his word, which he spoke by Ahijah to Jeroboam the son of Nebat.
10. The people of Israel took to their own tents and would not submit to the forced labor of Rehoboam who fled to Jerusalem.

2 Chronicles 11, Rehoboam Secures His Kingdom
1. When Rehoboam came to Jerusalem, he assembled the house of Judah and Benjamin, 180,000 chosen warriors, to fight against Israel to restore the kingdom to Rehoboam.
2. The Lord came to Shemaiah the man of God saying, “You shall not go up or fight against your relatives for this thing is from me.”
3. Rehoboam lived in Jerusalem and he built cities for defense in Judah (Bethlehem, Etam, Tekoa, Beth-zur, Soco, Adullam, Gath, Mareshah, Ziph, Adoraim, Lachish, Azehah, Zorah, Aijalon, and Hebron).
4. Rehoboam held Judah and Benjamin (effectively dividing the kingdom into two).
5. When Jeroboam cast out the priests of the Lord, they came presented themselves to Rehoboam making the kingdom of Judah under Rehoboam secure, walking in the way of David and Solomon.
6. However, Jeroboam replaced the priests of the Lord with his own priest for the high places and for the goat idols and for the calves that he had made.
7. Rehoboam took as wife Mahalath and she bore him sons (Jeush, Shemariah, and Zaham).
8. After Mahalath, he took Maacah who bore him Abijah, Attai, Ziza, and Shelomith; he loved Maacah the most (over 18 wives, 60 concubines).
9. Rehoboam fathered 28 sons and 60 daughters; he appointed Abijah as chief prince among these, for he intended to make him king.

2 Chronicles 12, Egypt Plunders Jerusalem
1. When the rule of Rehoboam was established and strong, he abandoned the law of the Lord, and all Israel with him.
2. In the 5th year of Rehoboam, Shishak king of Egypt came up against Jerusalem with 1,200 chariots and 60,000 horsemen, and people without number from Libyans, Sukkiim, and Ethiopians.
3. They took the fortified cities of Judah arriving at Jerusalem to do the same.
4. Then the Lord told Shemaiah the prophet to say to Rehoboam, “You abandoned me, so I have abandoned you to the hand of Shishak king of Egypt.”
5. Then the princes of Israel and the king humbled themselves and said, “The Lord is righteous.”
6. When the Lord saw that they humbled themselves, he sent word by Shemaiah, “They have humbled themselves. I will not destroy them, but I will grant them some deliverance, and my wrath shall not be poured out on Jerusalem by the hand of Shishak; but they will be servants to him that they may know my service and the service of my countries.”
7. Shishak king of Egypt took away the treasures of the house of the Lord and the treasures of the king’s house; he took everything.
8. Rehoboam was 41 when he began to reign and he reigned for 17 years in Jerusalem.
9. There were continual wars between Rehoboam and Jeroboam.
10. Abijah, Rehoboam’s son reigned in his place.

2 Chronicles 13, Abijah Reigns in Judah
1. War between Abijah and Jeroboam broke out and Abijah went out to battle having an army of 400,000 against Jeroboam’s 800,000.
2. At the line of battle, Abijah stood on Mount Zemaraim in the hill country of Ephraim and said that the covenant with the Lord and David gave the kingship over to Israel forever to David and his sons and you think that you can withstand the kingdom of the Lord because you are a great multitude.
3. Abijah reminded Jeroboam’s army that they have with them the golden calves that were made into gods, but we have not forsaken the Lord and our priests minister to the Lord as the sons of Aaron did.
4. Even though Jeroboam had sent an ambush around behind Abijah to surround him, God defeated Jeroboam and all Israel before Abijah and Judah.
5. The men of Israel fled before Judah losing 500,000 men because they relied on the Lord, the God of their fathers.
6. Jeroboam did not recover his power in the days of Abijah and the Lord struck Jeroboam down, but Abijah grew strong.
7. Abijah had 14 wives, 22 sons and 16 daughters.

2 Chronicles 14, Asa Reigns in Judah
1. Abijah was buried in the city of David and Asa his son reigned in his place.
2. Asa did good and right in the eyes of the Lord his God.
3. He took away the foreign altars and the high places, broke down the pillars, cut down the Asherim; he commanded Judah to seek the Lord, the God of their fathers, and to keep the law and the commandment.
4. He took out of all the cities of Judah the high places and the incense altars and the kingdom had rest under Asa.
5. Asa had an army of 300,000 from Judah and 280,000 from Benjamin.
6. Zerah the Ethiopian came against Asa with 1,000,000 men and 300 chariots and Asa went out to meet them where he cried out to the Lord for help.
7. So the Lord defeated the Ethiopians before Asa and before Judah; they fled until none remained alive, for they were broken before the Lord and his army.
8. The men of Judah carried away much spoil and returned to Jerusalem.

2 Chronicles 15, Asa’s Religious Reforms
1. Azariah said to Asa, the Lord of God is with you and if you seek him, he will be found by you, but if you forsake him, he will forsake you.
2. Asa listened to the prophecy of Azariah, he took courage and put away the detestable idols from all the land of Judah and Benjamin and from the cities that he had taken in the hill country of Ephraim.
3. He repaired the altar of the Lord and gathered all Judah and Benjamin and those in Ephraim, Manasseh, and Simeon who were residing with them.
4. They gathered in Jerusalem and sacrificed to the Lord on that day sacrificing 700 oxen and 7,000 sheep.
5. They entered into a covenant to seek the Lord with all their heart and soul.
6. Whoever would not seek the Lord, the God of Israel, should be put to death, whether young or old, man or woman.
7. They swore an oath to the Lord with a loud voice and with shouting and with trumpets and with horns.
8. Asa’s mother Maacah was removed from being queen mother because she had made a detestable image for Ashera; he cut it down and crushed it then burned it.
9. However, he did not take down the high places out of Israel.
10. Asa brought into the house of God the sacred gifts of his father and his own sacred gifts, silver, and gold, and vessels.
11. There was no more war until the thirty-firth year of the reign of Asa.

Week #62; Wed, Mar 06: 2 Chronicles 16–23

Week #62; Wed, Mar 06: 2 Chronicles 16:1–23:21

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. King Asa’s reliance on other kings (Ben-hadad of Syria) rather than the Lord God was a big mistake.
2. Repeatedly, good and evil were the signs of the rulers that came to the throne of Israel and Judah.
3. The actions of the kings were in the sight of the Lord and he judged them according to his commands and the Law.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Chronicles 16, King Asa’s Final Years
1. Asa was confronted by Baasha king of Israel who built Ramah that he might permit no one to go out or come in to Asa king of Judah.
2. Asa’s response was to send silver and gold to Ben-hadad king of Syria to intice him to break his covenant with Baasha so that he would withdraw from his works in Ramah.
3. Ben-hadad listened to King Asa and sent his armies against the cities of Israel.
4. When Baasha heard of it, he stopped building Ramah and let his work cease.
5. Asa used the stones and timbers to build Geba and Mizpah, but Hanani the seer came to Asa and said, “Because you relied on the king of Syria, and did not rely on the Lord your God, the army of the king of Syria has escaped you.”
6. Hanani told Asa that he had done foolishly and that from now on you will have wars; Asa was enraged and put Hanani in stocks in prison.
7. Asa became diseased in his feet and it became severe yet he did not seek the Lord, but sought help from physicians.
8. Asa ruled 41 years and was buried in Jerusalem.

2 Chronicles 17, Jehoshaphat Reigns in Judah
1. Jehoshaphat son of Asa, ruled in Judah and strengthened himself against Israel.
2. Jehoshaphat followed the ways of David; he did not seek the Baals, but sought the God of his father and walked in his commandments, not according to the practices of Israel.
3. Therefore the Lord established the kingdom in his hand; all of Judah brought tribute to Jehoshaphat, and he had great riches and honor.
4. His heart was courageous in the ways of the Lord and he took the high places and the Asherim out of Judah.
5. He sent officials, Levites, and priests to teach the Book of the Law throughout Judah.
6. The fear of the Lord fell on all the kingdoms around Judah; they stopped making war against Judah.
7. Philistines and Arabians brought presents to Jehoshaphat as a tribute increasing his wealth and honor.
8. Jehoshaphat mustered over 1,000,000 soldiers in his service.

2 Chronicles 18, Jehoshaphat Allies with Ahab King of Israel
1. Jehoshaphat used his great riches to create an alliance with Ahab king of Israel.
2. Ahab induced Jehoshaphat to go up against Ramoth-gilead.
3. Jehoshaphat agreed to go with Ahab after inquiring first for the word of the Lord.
4. 400 prophets of Ahab assembled and said to go up for the Lord will give it into the hand of the king.
5. But Jehoshaphat also sought out Micaiah to hear his words but Ahab was unwilling to take the prophecy of Micaiah for he believed his words were evil because of past prophecies.
6. Micaiah said that the other prophets were lying and that the Lord has declared disaster concerning Ramoth-gilead.
7. Micaiah was struck on the cheek by Zedekiah and Ahab had him put in prison and fed bread and water.
8. Ahab died in defeat at Ramoth-gilead after disguising himself during the battle.
9. The Syrians were commanded to fight with only the king of Israel; they believed that to be Jehoshaphat because he wore his robe.
10. Jehoshaphat cried out, and the Lord helped him; God drew the Syrians away from him and pursued Ahab striking him with an arrow and killing him on that day.

2 Chronicles 19, Jehoshaphat’s Reforms
1. Jehoshaphat returned in safety to Jerusalem, but Jehu the seer went out to meet him and said, “Should you help the wicked and love those who hate the Lord? Because of this, wrath has gone out against you from the Lord. Nevertheless, some good is found in you, for you destroyed the Asherahs out of the land, and have set your heart to seek God.”
2. Jehoshaphat went out again among the people and brought them back to the Lord, the God of their fathers.
3. He appointed judges in the land telling them they judge not for man but for the Lord who is with you in giving judgment so fear the Lord and be careful what you do.
4. He warned the judges that there is no injustice with the Lord our God, or partiality, or taking bribes.
5. Jehoshaphat appointed Amariah the chief priest over the judges in Jerusalem warning them that they are to judge in the fear of the Lord, in faithfulness, and with their whole heart.

2 Chronicles 20, Jehoshaphat’s Prayer to the Lord God for Deliverance from a Multitude of Enemies
1. The Moabites, Ammonites, and Meunites came against Jehoshaphat for battle and Jehoshaphat gathered all of Judah proclaiming a fast and to seek the Lord in prayer.
2. Jehoshaphat prayed that the Lord God execute judgment on them and protect them.
3. Jahaziel a Levite spoke the Spirit of the Lord that came to him saying not to be afraid for the battle is not yours but God’s.
4. You will not need to fight, go out and stand firm, hold your position and see the salvation of the Lord for he will be with you.
5. Then Jehoshaphat bowed his head with his face to the ground, and all Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem fell down before the Lord, worshiping the Lord.
6. They rose early and went out into the wilderness following Jehoshaphat who stood and said for them to believe in the Lord your God and his prophets, and you will be established and succeed.
7. Jehoshaphat instructed some to sing and praise saying, “Give thanks to the Lord, for his steadfast love endures forever.”
8. When they began to sing the enemies destroyed one another before the eyes of the people, none had escaped.
9. It took three days for the people of Judah to take the spoil from the enemies.
10. On the fourth day they assembled in the Valley of Beracah to bless the Lord.
11. Then they returned to their homes with great joy, for the Lord had made them rejoice over their enemies.
12. They came to Jerusalem with harps, lyres, and trumpets to the house of the Lord.
13. The fear of God came on all the kingdoms of the countries when they heard that the Lord had fought against the enemies of Israel.
14. So the realm of Jehoshaphat was quiet, for the Lord God gave him rest all around.
15. Jehoshaphat reigned for 25 years in Jerusalem walking in the way of the Lord, yet the high places were not taken away.
16. Jehoshaphat joined with Ahaziah king of Israel after this to build ships to go to Tarshish.
17. Eliezer prophesied against Jehoshaphat saying the Lord will destroy what you have made; the ships were wrecked and not able to go to Tarshish.

2 Chronicles 21, Jehoram Reigns in Judah
1. Jehoram ruled in the place of his father Jehoshaphat who gave him and his brothers great gifts of silver, gold and valuable possessions together with fortified cities in Judah; because Jehoram was the firstborn, he was make king.
2. When Jehoram became king, he killed all his brothers with the sword, and some of the princes of Israel.
3. He walked in the way of the kings of Israel, like Ahab; the daughter of Ahab was his wife.
4. Jehoram reigned for only eight years but he did evil in the sight of the Lord.
5. The Lord was not willing to destroy the house of David, because of the covenant that he had made with David.
6. Edom revolted from the rule of Judah and set up a king of their own, but they were struck down by Jehoram.
7. Jehoram made high places in the hill country of Judah and led the inhabitants of Jerusalem into whoredom and made Judah go astray.
8. Elijah the prophet informed Jehoram that because he had not walked in the ways of Jehoshaphat or Asa, but walked in the way of the kings of Israel and enticed Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem into whoredom, as did the house of Ahab and you have killed your brothers, the Lord will bring a great plague on your people, your children, your wives and all your possessions, and you yourself will have a severe sickness of the bowels daily.
9. The Lord stirred up the Philistines and the Arabians who invaded Judah carrying away all the possessions they found in the king’s house, and also his sons and wives; only Jehoahaz the youngest son was left.
10. Jehoram died in great agony after two years of severe illness of his bowels and he departed with no one’s regret.

2 Chronicles 22, Ahaziah and Athalia Reign in Judah
1. The inhabitants of Jerusalem made Ahaziah (youngest son of Jehoram) king in Judah who reigned for one year doing evil in the sight of the lord for Athaliah (wife of Ahab) his mother was his counselor in doing wickedly.
2. Ahaziah followed their counsel and went with Jehoram the son of Ahab and king of Israel to make war against Hazael king of Syria at Ramoth-gilead.
3. Joram son of Ahab was wounded at Ramoth-gilead by the Syrians; Ahaziah went to see him at Jezreel where he was recovering.
4. Because it was ordained by God that the downfall of Ahaziah should come about through his going to visit Joram, Jehu was there destroying the house of Ahab and he killed Ahaziah (among many others).
5. The house of Ahaziah had no one able to rule the kingdom of Judah so Athaliah his mother arose and destroyed all of the royal house of Judah.
6. Joash son of Ahaziah was spared by Jehoshabeath daughter of King Jehoram who hid him in the house of God for six years while Athaliah ruled Judah.

2 Chronicles 23, Joash Made King
1. Jehoiada the priest said to the commanders, the Levites, the priests, and all the assembly at the house of God, “Behold the king’s son! Let him reign, as the Lord spoke concerning the sons of David.”
2. Jehoiada set all the people as armed guards for the king.
3. Then they brought out the king’s son and put the crown on him and gave him the testimony; they then proclaimed him king.
4. Jehoiada and his sons anointed him, and they said, “Long live the king.”
5. Athaliah went to the house of the Lord to the people who were rejoicing, where she cried, “Treason! Treason!
6. Then Jehoiada the priest brought out the captains saying, “Bring her out between the ranks, and anyone who follows her will be put to the sword.”
7. Athaliah was taken out of the house of the Lord and put to death at the horse gate of the king’s house.
8. Jehoiada made a covenant between himself and all the people and the king that they should be the Lord’s people.
9. All the people then went to the house of Baal and tore it down; his altars and images they broke in pieces.
10. They killed Mattan the priest of Baal before the altars.
11. They brought the king down from the house of the Lord and set him on the royal throne and rejoiced.
12. The city was quiet.

Week #63; Wed, Mar 13: 2 Chronicles 24–29

Week #63; Wed, Mar 13: 2 Chronicles 24:1–29:36

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The repair and restoration of the house of the Lord by King Joash was short lived.
2. Amaziah’s pride turned him away from the Lord resulting in his demise.
3. Likewise Uzziah’s pride turned him away from the Lord and he became a leper for the rest of his life.
4. Ahaz was an idolator and turned away too, but the service of the house of the Lord was restored by Hezekiah.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Chronicles 24, Joash Repairs the Temple, His Treachery, and Assination
1. Joash was only 7 years old when he began to reign and he reigned for 40 years in Jerusalem doing what was right in the eyes of the Lord.
2. Joash decided to restore the house of the Lord telling the priests and the Levites to go out to all the cities of Judah to gather money to repair the house of God quickly.
3. However, the Levites did not go out quickly so Joash commanded that a chest be made and set outside the gate of the house of the Lord for the people to bring in their taxes.
4. A proclamation was made throughout Judah and Jerusalem to bring in the tax that Moses laid on Israel in the wilderness.
5. Money was collected in abundance and it was given to those who had charge of the work until the house of the Lord was restored.
6. When the house of God was finished, they brought the rest of the money before the king and Jehoiada and they made utensils for the house of the Lord both for the service and for the burnt offerings, and dishes for incense, and vessels of gold and silver.
7. They offered burnt offerings in the house of the Lord regularly all the days of Jehoiada, the chief.
8. When Jehoiada was 130 years old he died and was buried with the kings in the city of David, having done good in Israel.
9. The princes came to King Joash to pay homage but they abandoned the house of the Lord, the God of their fathers, and served the Asherim and the idols.
10. Wrath came upon Judah and Jerusalem for this guilt of theirs, yet he sent prophets among them to bring them back to the Lord but it was of no avail.
11. The Spirit of God clothed Zechariah the son of Jehoiada saying, “Why do you break the commandments of the Lord, so that you cannot prosper? Because you have forsaken the Lord, he has forsaken you.”
12. But Zechariah was rejected and King Joash commanded Zechariah to be stoned.
13. Zechariah said, “May the Lord see and avenge!” before he died.
14. Syria came up against Joash destroying all the princes, and they sent all their spoil to the king of Damascus.
15. The Syrians also executed judgment on Joash severely wounding him and his servants finished killing him because of the blood of the son of Jehoiada the priest.
16. Then Amaziah his son reigned in his place.

2 Chronicles 25, Amaziah Reigns in Judah, His Victories, His Idolatry, and Defeat
1. Amaziah was 25 when he began to reign, and he reigned for 29 years doing what was right in the eyes of the Lord, yet not with his whole heart.
2. As soon as he was firmly in power, he struck down the servants who had struck down the king his father, but he did not kill their children.
3. Amaziah’s 300,000 man army was victorious over Seir killing 20,000 Edomites; but he had hired another 100,000 men from Israel that he returned because of a message from a man from God.
4. The men of Israel were very angry and while Amaziah was at war, the Israelites struck down 3,000 in the cities of Judah and took much spoil.
5. When Amaziah returned from striking the Edomites, he brought back the gods of Seir and set them up as his gods and worshiped them, making offerings to them.
6. The Lord was angry with Amaziah and sent him a prophet who said to him, “Why have you sought the gods of a people who did not deliver their own people form your hand? I know that God has determined to destroy you, because you have done this and have not listened to my counsel.”
8. When Amaziah challenged Israel, He sent to Joash saying, “Come, let us look one another in the face.”
9. Amaziah threw caution from Joash to the wind and he went up to him at Bethshemesh in Judah where Judah was defeated (for it was of God in order that he might give them into the hand of their enemies because they had sought the gods of Edom).
10. Joash king of Israel captured Amaziah king of Judah and brought him to Jerusalem and broke down the wall of Jerusalem for 400 cubits; he seized all the gold and silver and all the vessels that were found in the house of God and the treasuries in the king’s house, plus hostages and returned to Samaria.
11. Joash fled to Lachish where he was put to death by conspirators in Jerusalem.

2 Chronicles 26, Uzzah Reigns in Judah, His Pride, and His Punishment
1. Uzziah was made king at 16 reigning for 52 years in Jerusalem doing what was right in the eyes of the Lord seeking God in the days of Zechariah and prospering.
2. Uzziah made war against the Philistines, Arabians, and the Meunites; he became strong and famous.
3. He built towers in Jerusalem and in the wilderness and fortified them; he had 310,100 in his army and many devices of war were invented to sling stones and arrows.
4. But when Uzziah grew strong, he grew proud to his destruction for he was unfaithful to the Lord and entered the temple to burn incense on the altar of incense.
5. Azariah and 80 priests went in after him and rebuked him, but Uzziah became angry and as his anger flared, he broke out in leprosy because the Lord had struck him.
6. He remained a leper until he died and Jotham his son reigned in his place.

2 Chronicles 27, Jotham Reigns in Judah
1. Jotham was 25 when he began to reign in Jerusalem; he reigned for 16 years doing what was right in the eyes of the Lord according to all his father Uzziah had done, except he did not enter the temple of the Lord and the people still followed corrupt practices.
2. Jotham built the upper gate to the house of the Lord and did much building on the wall of Ophel.
3. He built cities in the hill country of Judah, and forts and towers on the wooded hills.
4. He fought with the king of the Ammonites and prevailed against them; receiving silver, wheat, and barley in abundance each year.
5. Jotham became mighty, because he ordered his ways before the Lord his God.
6. Ahaz his son reigned in his place.

2 Chronicles 28, Ahaz Reigns in Judah, Judah is Defeated, Ahaz’s Idolatry
1. Ahaz was 20 when he began to reign, and he reigned 16 years in Jerusalem doing evil in the sight of the Lord walking in the ways of the kings of Israel.
2. He made metal images for the Baals, he made offerings in the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, and burned his sons as an offering, according to the abominations of the nations whom the Lord drove out before the people of Israel.
3. He sacrificed by making offerings on the high places, the hills, and under every green tree.
4. So, the Lord used the king of Syria to defeat Ahaz bringing large numbers of his people to Damascus.
5. Ahaz was given to the king of Israel; he lost 120,000 in one day because he had forsaken the Lord.
6. Ahaz’s son Maaseiah was killed along with Azrikam the commander and Elkanah the next in authority to the king.
7. Israel took 200,000 captives from the relatives, women, sons, and daughters along with much spoil back to Samaria.
8. Oded, a prophet met the men of Israel telling them to send the captives back to Judah because the wrath of the Lord is against you for these sins.
9. Many of the chiefs stood up against those who were coming from war and said to them, “You shall not bring the captives in here, for you propose to bring upon us guilt against the Lord in addition to our present sins and guilt.”
10. The captives were brought to their kinsfolk at Jericho and the men of Israel returned to Samaria.
11. King Ahaz sent to the king of Assyria for help for the Edomites and Philistines again had invaded and defeated Judah and carried away captives.
12. Instead of strengthening Ahaz, the Assyrians came against him and although Ahaz gave tribute to the king of Assyria; it did not help him.
13. Ahaz became more faithless to the Lord for he sacrificed to the gods of Damascus that had defeated him.
14. Ahaz converted the vessels of the house of the Lord into altars, locked the doors, and made high places for sacrifices provoking the Lord to anger.
15. Ahaz’s son Hezekiah reigned in his place.

2 Chronicles 29, Hezekiah Reigns in Judah, Hezekiah Cleanses the Temple, and He Restores Temple Worship
1. Hezekiah was 25 when he began to rule in Judah; he reigned for 29 years doing right in the eyes of the Lord.
2. Hezekiah opened the doors to the temple and cleansed and repaired all that was in it removing all filth.
3. Hezekiah brought in the priests and the Levites instructing them to consecrate themselves and the house of the Lord and to minister to him and make offerings to him.
4. Hezekiah made a covenant with the Lord in order that his fierce anger would turn away.
5. The priests and the Levites consecrated themselves and went in to cleans the house of the Lord as he had commanded.
6. After 16 days the priest and the Levites reported that the house of the Lord was fully consecrated and all vessels had been restored.
7. The King Hezekiah ordered sacrifices on the altar of the Lord for burnt offering and sin offering for all of Israel.
8. The Levites stood in the house of the Lord with symbols, harps, and lyres along with the priests with trumpets and the whole assembly worshiped, the singers sang, and the trumpeters sounded until the burnt offering was finished.
9. Then Hezekiah and the officials commanded the Levites to sing praises to the Lord with the words of David and of Asaph the seer.
10. Thus the service of the house of the Lord was restored.

Week #64; Wed, Mar 20: 2 Chronicles 30–35

Week #64; Wed, Mar 20: 2 Chronicles 30:1–35:27

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. It appears that once the temple was consecrated by the priests and the Levites, Hezekiah reached out to Israel and Judah to return to the Lord at the temple of the Lord in Jerusalem to celebrate the Passover together.
2. While kings came to the house of the Lord during their reign, some abandoned it at great expense to them and their kingdom.
3. When the Book of the Law of the Lord was found by Hilkiah the priest in the house of the Lord it was given to Shaphan who brought it to the king who realized that the wrath of the Lord that is poured out on them was due to not keeping the word of the Lord, to do all that is written in the book.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Chronicles 30, Passover Celebrated
1. Couriers were sent to all Israel and Judah by King Hezekiah saying that all should come to the house of the Lord at Jerusalem to keep the Passover to the Lord, the God of Israel.
2. Desolation was still evident among the people of Israel even though many had escaped from the hand of the kings of Assyria.
3. King Hezekiah urged all not to “be stiff-necked, but to return and yield themselves to the Lord that his fierce anger may turn away from them for the Lord is gracious and merciful and will not turn away his face from you, if you return to him.”
4. Some of the couriers were laughed, scorned, and mocked except in Asher and Zebulun; Judah also was given the heart to do what the king and the princes commanded by the word of the Lord.
5. The Passover lamb was slaughtered on the 14th day of the second month yet many there were not clean but still ate the Passover other than as prescribed.
6. Hezekiah prayed for them, saying, “May the good Lord pardon everyone who sets his heart to seek God, the Lord, the God of his fathers, even though not according to the sanctuary’s rules of cleanness.”
7. The Lord heard Hezekiah and healed the people.
8. The Feast of Unleavened Bread was extended from 7 days to 14 days with gladness and joy.
9. All in Israel and Judah rejoiced with great joy for nothing like this was seen in Jerusalem since the time of Solomon.
10. When the priests and the Levites arose and blessed the people, their voice was heard, and their prayer came to his holy habitation in heaven.

2 Chronicles 31, Hezekiah Organizes the Priests
1. Following the Passover, “all Israel who were present went out to the cities of Judah and broke in pieces the pillars and cut down the Asherim and broke down the high places and the altars throughout all Judah and Benjamin, and in Ephraim and Manasseh, until they had destroyed them all.”
2. Hezekiah commanded chambers to be prepared to hold excess heaps of contributions when he discovered that the tithes of the people satisfied all.
3. Hezekiah organized throughout all Judah, and he did what was good and right and faithful before the Lord his God.
4. Every work Hezekiah undertook, he did with all his heart, and prospered.

2 Chronicles 32, Sennacherib Invades Judah, He Blasphemes, The Lord Delivers Jerusalem, and Hezekiah’s Pride and Achievements
1. Following the previous acts of faithfulness, Hezekiah saw that Sennacherib the king of Assyria invaded Judah encamping against the fortified cities to win them for himself.
2. Hezekiah stopped all the springs from flowing, repaired the wall that was broken, and built towers.
3. He built a second wall outside the inner wall and strengthened the Millo in the city of David.
4. He made weapons and shields in abundance and assigned combat commanders over the people.
5. He gathered the people together and encouraged them to be strong and courageous, not to be afraid for the Lord our God, is with us to help us and to fight our battles.
6. The people took confidence from Hezekiah king of Judah.
7. Sennacherib besieged Lachish on his way to Jerusalem and notified Hezekiah in that the God of Israel could not stop him from taking Jerusalem.
8. Sennacherib compared the God of Israel with all the other gods that could not protect other nations from the Assyrian forces; he identified the “one” altar for the God of Israel as nothing more than that of the other gods.
9. Sennacherib cautioned the people of Jerusalem not to trust Hezekiah and he casted contempt on the Lord, the God of Israel.
10. Sennacherib taunted defenders on the wall and sent letters of contempt for the God of Israel.
11. Then Hezekiah the king and Isaiah the prophet, prayed because of the threat from Sennacherib.
12. The Lord sent an angel, who cut off all the mighty warriors and commanders and officers in the camp of the king of Assyria.
13. Sennacherib returned to Assyria in shame where some of his own sons struck him down with the sword in the house of his own god.
14. The Lord saved Hezekiah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem from Sennacherib and from the hand of all his enemies.
15. Many brought gifts to the Lord to Jerusalem and precious things to Hezekiah king of Judah, so that he was exalted in the sight of all nations from that time onward.
16. Hezekiah became sick and was at the point of death, and he prayed to the Lord; the Lord answered him and gave him a sign.
17. Hezekiah’s heart became proud and the Lord caused wrath to come upon him, Judah, and Jerusalem.
18. But Hezekiah humbled himself for the pride in his heart, both he and the inhabitants of Jerusalem, so that the wrath of the Lord did not come upon them in the days of Hezekiah.
19. After that, Hezekiah had very great riches and honor, and he made for himself treasuries for silver, for gold, for precious stones, for spices, for shields, and for all kinds of costly vessels; he had storehouses for grain, wine, and oil, stalls for cattle and sheep.
20. God had given him very great possessions.
21. Manasseh son of Hezekiah reigned in his place.

2 Chronicles 33, Manasseh Reigns in Judah, His Repentance, and Amon’s Reign and Death
1. Manasseh was 12 when he began to reign and he reigned 55 years in Jerusalem doing evil in the sight of the Lord.
2. He rebuilt the high places that his father Hezekiah had broken down, and erected altars to the Baals, and made Asherahs, and worshiped all the host of heaven and served them.
3. He burned his sons as an offering in the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, and used fortune-telling and omens and sorcery, and dealt with mediums and necromancers.
4. He made a carved image and he set it in the house of God.
5. Manasseh led Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem astray, to do more evil than the nations whom the Lord destroyed before the people of Israel.
6. When the Lord spoke to Manasseh, he paid no attention.
7. Therefore the Lord brought upon them the commanders of the army of Assyria who captured him with hooks and bound him in chains of bronze and brought him to Babylon.
8. Manasseh prayed to the Lord and humbled himself greatly.
9. God was moved by his prayer and brought him again to Jerusalem; then Manasseh knew that the Lord was God.
10. Manasseh built an outer wall for the city of David and raised it to a great height.
11. He put commanders of the army in all the fortified cities in Judah.
12. He took away the foreign gods and the idol from the house of the Lord, and all the altars that he had built on the mountain of the house of the Lord and in Jerusalem.
13. He restored the altar of the Lord and offered on it sacrifices of peace offerings and of thanksgiving.
14. He commanded Judah to serve the Lord, the God of Israel.
15. But the people still sacrificed at the high places, but only to the Lord their God.
16. Amon his son reigned in his place beginning when he was 22; he reigned for 2 years doing evil in the sight of the Lord, like Manasseh his father.
17. Amon sacrificed to all the images that Manasseh his father had made, and served them.
18. Amon did not humble himself before the Lord but incurred guilt more and more.
19. His servants conspired against him and put him to death in his house, but the people of the land struck down all those who had conspired against King Amon.
20. The people of the land made Josiah his son king in his place.

2 Chronicles 34, Josiah Reigns in Judah, The Book of the Law Found, and Huldah Prophesies Disaster
1. Josiah was 8 when he began to reign and he reigned 31 years in Jerusalem doing what was right in the eyes of the Lord.
2. In the 12th year of his reign, he began to seek the God of David and in the 20th year he began to purge Judah and Jerusalem of the high places, the Asherim, and the carved and metal images.
3. They chopped down the altars of the Baals in his presence and he cut down the incense altars that stood above them.
4. He broke in pieces the Asherim and the carved and metal images and he made dust of them and scattered it over the graves of those who had sacrificed to them.
5. He burned the bones of the priests on their altars and cleansed Judah and Jerusalem.
6. He broke down the altars and beat the Asherim and the images into powder and cut down all the incense altars throughout all the land of Israel before returning to Jerusalem.
7. When the Book of the Law of the Lord was found by Hilkiah the priest during repairs to the house of the Lord, King Josiah sent Hilkiah, Ahikam, Abdon, Shaphan, and Asaiah to go inquire of the Lord for him and for those who are left in Israel and in Judah, concerning the words of the book that has been found.
8. It was feared that the wrath of the Lord that was poured out on them because their fathers did not keep the word of the Lord, to do according to all that is written in the book.
9. They went to Huldah the prophetess in Jerusalem and she said to them, “Behold, I will bring disaster upon this place and upon its inhabitants, all the curses that are written in the book that was read before the king of Judah.”
10. Upon hearing the words of Huldah, Josiah gathered together all the elders of Judah and Jerusalem where he read all the words of the Book of the Covenant that had been found in the house of the Lord.
11. The king then made a covenant before the Lord, to walk after the Lord and to keep his commandments and his testimonies and his statutes to perform the words of the covenant that were written in this book.
12. He made all who were present in Jerusalem and in Benjamin join in it.
13. Josiah took away all the abominations from all the territory that belonged to the people of Israel and made all who were present in Israel serve the Lord their God.

2 Chronicles 35, Josiah Keeps the Passover and Josiah is Killed in Battle
1. Josiah kept a Passover to the Lord in Jerusalem.
2. He had the Levites put the holy ark in the house that Solomon built.
3. They were to prepare themselves and stand in the Holy Place and slaughter the Passover lamb, and consecrate themselves and their brothers to do according to the word of the Lord by Moses.
4. Vast amounts of goats and bulls were contributed for Passover offerings for all who were present.
5. When the service had been prepared, the priests stood in their place, and the Levites in their divisions slaughtered the Passover lamb throwing blood on the altar.
6. No Passover like it had been kept in Israel since the days of Samuel the prophet; it was the 18th year of the reign of Josiah.
7. Neco king of Egypt went up to fight at Carchemish on the Euphrates and Josiah went out to meet him.
8. Neco told Josiah he was not coming against him but against the house with which he was at war.
9. But Josiah did not turn aside and disguised himself in order to fight with him.
10. Neco’s archers shot Josiah at the plain of Megiddo and he was taken to Jerusalem where he died.

Week #65; Wed, Mar 27: 2 Chronicles 36–Ezra 7

Week #65; Wed, Mar 27: 2 Chronicles 36:1–Ezra 7:27

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. When the “people of the land” took Jehoahaz the son of Josiah and made him king, it appears that the will of the Lord moved the people to that action.
2. However, Neco the king of Egypt deposed Jehoahaz and took him to Egypt.
3. Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon then came up against Jehoiakim binding him in chains and carrying him off to Babylon along with part of the vessels of the house of the Lord and Nebuchadnezzar put them in his palace.
4. Cyrus’ proclamation to rebuild the house of the Lord in Jerusalem resulted in all who were about them aiding them with gifts of vessels of silver and gold and with goods and beasts plus costly wares and freewill gifts.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
2 Chronicles 36, Judah’s Decline, Jerusalem Captured and Burned, and the Proclamation of Cyrus
1. Jehoahaz became king at 23 and ruled for only three months in Jerusalem before Neco deposed him and replaced him with Eliakim his 25 year old brother; Neco renamed Eliakim to Jehoiakim.
2. Jehoiakim reigned 11 years and did what was evil in the sight of the Lord.
3. Jehoiachin son of Jehoiakim reigned in his place when he was 18 and he reigned three months in Jerusalem doing evil in the sight of the Lord.
4. Nebuchadnezzar sent and brought Jehoiachin to Babylon along with the vessels of the house of the Lord and made his brother Zedekiah king over Judah and Jerusalem.
5. Zedekiah was 21 when he began to reign, and he reigned 11 years in Jerusalem doing evil in the sight of the Lord; his pride resulted in mocking against the prophet Jeremiah.
6. Zedekiah rebelled against King Nebuchadnezzar and he stiffened his neck and hardened his heart against turning to the Lord.
7. All the officers and the priests were unfaithful and followed the abominations of the nations; they polluted the house of the Lord.
8. They mocked the messengers of God despising their words and scoffed at his prophets; but the wrath of the Lord rose against his people, until there was no remedy.
9. Jerusalem was captured and burned by the Chaldeans, who killed their young men with the sword and no compassion on anyone.
10. The Lord gave them all into their hands.
11. They burned the house of God and broke down the wall of Jerusalem while burning all of the palaces and destroying precious vessels.
12. Survivors were exiled to Babylon until the establishment of the kingdom of Persia to fulfill the prophesy of Jeremiah for 70 years.
13. In the first year of Cyrus king of Persia, the Lord stirred up the spirit of Cyrus, so that he made a proclamation throughout all his kingdom in writing.
14. He wrote: ” The Lord, the God of heaven, has given me all the kingdoms of the earth, and he has charged me to build him a house at Jerusalem, which is in Judah. Whoever is among you of all his people, may the Lord his God be with him. Let him go up.”

Ezra 1, The Proclamation of Cyrus
1. In the words of Cyrus’ proclamation, “And let each survivor, in whatever place he sojourns, be assisted by the men of his place with silver and gold, with goods and with beasts, besides freewill offerings for the house of God that is in Jerusalem.”
2. 5,400 vessels were taken out of the house of Nebuchadnezzar and counted out to Sheshbazzar the prince of Judah.
6. All these did Sheshbazzar bring up, when the exiles were brought up from Babylonia to Jerusalem.

Ezra 2, The Exiles Return
1. The exiles that Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon had carried captive to Babylonia were returned to Judah and Jerusalem.
2. The whole assembly was 42,360 besides their male and female servants.
3. The house of the Lord was rebuilt on its site.

Ezra 3, Rebuilding of the Altar and the Temple
1. Jeshua, with his fellow priests and Zerubbabel with his kinsmen built the altar of the God of Israel, to offer burnt offerings on it, as it is written in the Law of Moses the man of God.
2. They set the altar in its place, and they offered burnt offerings on it to the Lord morning and evening while keeping the Feasts of Booths and all of the burnt offerings in keeping with all the appointed feasts of the Lord.
3. When Jeshua and Zerubbabel oversaw the completion of the foundation of the temple of the Lord, the priests in their vestments came forward with trumpets, and the Levites with cymbals, to praise the Lord with song and thanksgiving.

Ezra 4, Adversaries Oppose the Rebuilding, Letter to King Artaxerxes, The King Orders the Work to Cease
1. While foreign adversaries of Judah and Benjamin offered to build alongside the returned exiles, Jeshua and Zerubbabel refused their help.
2. These people of the land discouraged the people of Judah and made them afraid to build and they frustrated their purpose all during the days of Cyrus, Darius, and Artaxerxes.
3. They wrote a letter to Artaxerxes against the Jews predicting that the Jews would again rebel against Artaxerxes and his kingdom.
4. King Artaxerxes searched the history and realized that rebellion and sedition have been made by Jews so he stopped the rebuilding of the city and the temple.

Ezra 5, Rebuilding Begins Anew, and Tattenai’s Letter to King Darius
1. Then Haggai and Zechariah prophesied to the Jews who were in Judah and Jerusalem in the name of God.
2. The rebuilding began again and the prophets were with them, supporting them.
3. Local officials challenged the resumption of the building and wanted to know the names of the leaders overseeing the work and by what decree.
4. The local leaders sent King Darius a letter reporting on the construction by the Jews; they wanted confirmation that Cyrus originally authorized the rebuilding of the temple and Jerusalem.
5. They awaited the reply from King Darius.

Ezra 6, The Decree of Darius, The Temple Completed and Dedicated, and the Passover Celebrated
1. Darius the king made a new decree revealing that the original decree by Cyrus was found and it showed that he authorized the return of the exiles with ample resources to rebuild the temple in Jerusalem, even identifying the dimensions and using gold and silver from the treasury to cover the cost.
2. The decree also commanded to “let the gold and silver vessels of the house of God, which Nebuchadnezzar took out of the temple that is in Jerusalem and brought to Babylon, be restored and brought back to the temple that is in Jerusalem, each to its place. You shall put them in the house of God.”
3. Darius told the local governors to keep away and to supply the Jews with materials for the rebuilding of this house of God with the costs paid in full without delay.
4. And whatever is needed for burnt offerings to the God of heaven as the priests in Jerusalem require, let that be given to them day by day without fail, that they may offer pleasing sacrifices to the God of heaven and pray for the life of the king and his sons.
5. He cautioned if anyone alters his edict, a beam shall be pulled out of his house, and he shall be impaled on it.
6. Darius’ decree was to be done with all diligence.
7. Darius’ decree was done with all diligence by the local governors of the land and the building was finished while Darius was still king.
8. All of the exiles celebrated the dedication of the house of God with joy.
9. The exiles also celebrated the Passover; the priest and the Levites had purified themselves together, all of them were clean.
10. And they kept the Feast of Unleavened Bread, thankful that the Lord had turned the heart of the king of Assyria to them by having him aid the people of Israel in the work of the house of God, the God of Israel.

Ezra 7, Ezra Sent to Teach the People
1. Ezra went up from Babylonia where he was a scribe skilled in the Law of Moses that the Lord had given and the king granted him all that he asked, for the hand of the Lord his God was on him.
2. Ezra had set his heart to study the Law of the Lord, and to do it and to teach his statutes and rules in Israel.
3. Artaxerxes gave Ezra the priest, the scribe, a decree that “anyone of the people of Israel or their priests or Levites in my kingdom, who freely offer to go to Jerusalem, may go with you.”
4. Artaxerxes’ decree included instructions to Ezra to inquire about Judah and Jerusalem and to carry the silver and gold that the king and his counselors have freely offered to the God of Israel.
5. Artaxerxes’ decree allowed Ezra to use the money to buy livestock, grain, and drink offering to offer on the altar of the house of his God that is in Jerusalem.
6. Artaxerxes’ decree made provision for Ezra to use the remaining money according to the will of his God.
7. Artaxerxes’ decree instructed that the vessels that have been given for the service of the house of your God, shall be delivered before the God of Jerusalem and whatever else is required for the house of your God shall come out of the king’s treasury.
8. Artaxerxes’ decree dictated that all the treasurers in the province Beyond the River provide whatever Ezra the priest, the scribe of the Law of the God of heaven requires.
9. Artaxerxes’ decree prohibited imposing tribute, custom, or toll on anyone of the priests, the Levites, singers, doorkeepers, temple servants, or other servants of this house of God.
10. Artaxerxes’ placed responsibility on Ezra to appoint magistrates and judges who may judge all the people in the province Beyond the River, all such as know the laws of your God; those who do not know them you shall teach.
11. Artaxerxes’ also placed responsibility on Ezra to strictly judge all who do not obey the laws of his God with death, banishment, confiscation of goods or imprisonment.
12. Ezra blessed the Lord, the God of his fathers, who put things into the heart of the king to beautify the house of the Lord that is in Jerusalem and who extended him his steadfast love before the king and his counselors and before the king’s mighty officers.
13. Ezra took courage, for the hand of the Lord his God was on him, and he gathered leading men from Israel to go up with him.

Week #66; Wed, Apr 03: Ezra 8–Nehemiah 4

Week #66; Wed, Apr 03: Ezra 8:1–Nehemiah 4:23

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Here we see more evidence of the “lifeline of Christ” in the Old Testament with the genealogy of those Hebrews who returned with Ezra from Babylonia which includes the sons of David.
2. When Ezra learned that the exiles took foreign women as wives, he required those involved to confess their sins and put away their foreign wives and children; and they did.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Ezra 8, Genealogy of Those That Returned With Ezra, Ezra Sends for the Levites, Fasting and Prayer for Protection, and Priests to Guard Offerings
1. The sons of David are included in the genealogy of the Hebrews that returned with Ezra from exile in Babylonia.
2. Ezra gathered Levites from Iddo in Casiphia to minister for the house of God.
3. Mahli a son of Levi was found with his sons,
4. Ezra then proclaimed a fast at the river Ahava to humble themselves and seek safe journey to Judah.
5. Ezra designated the priests and the Levites to guard the gold, silver, holy vessels, and free will offerings until they could be weighed within the chambers of the house of the Lord in Jerusalem.
6. The hand of God delivered them from the hand of the enemy and from ambushes by the way.
7. When Meremoth the priest received the gold, silver, holy vessels, and free will offerings in Jerusalem, they were recorded and weighed.
8. Burnt offerings were made by those who had come from captivity in Babylonia.
9. The king’s commissions were delivered to the king’s satraps and to the governors of the province Beyond the River.
10. They began to aid the people and the house of God per the king’s dictate.

Ezra 9, Ezra Prays About Intermarriage
1. Ezra discovered that many of the exiles took some of the daughters to be wives so that the holy race mixed itself with the peoples of the lands.
2. Ezra tore his garments and pulled hair from his head and beard and sat appalled.
3. Because of the faithlessness of the returned exiles, Ezra prayed to the Lord God in great lament for what they did.
4. While Ezra prayed and confessed great numbers of men, women, and children gathered to him out of Israel and all wept bitterly.

Ezra 10, The People Confess Their Sins and Those Guilty of Intermarriage
1. The exiles made a covenant with God to put away all the wives and their children, according to the Law.
2. Then Ezra arose and made the leading priests and Levites and all Israel take an oath that they would do as had been said.
3. Ezra required all the exiles to assemble in Jerusalem within 3 days otherwise lose all property.
4. All the people sat in heavy rain in the open square before the house of God to make confession to the Lord to do his will to separate themselves from the peoples of the land and from the foreign wives; all agreed.

Nehemiah 1, Report from Jerusalem and Nehemiah’s Prayer
1. Nehemiah was told that the remnant in Jerusalem was in great trouble and shame; the wall of Jerusalem is broken down, and its gates are destroyed by fire.
2. As soon as he heard these words, he sat down and wept and mourned for days, and he continued fasting and praying before the God in heaven.
3. Confession centered on failure to keep the commandments, the statutes, and the rules that God commanded Moses.
4. The word to Moses included, “If you are unfaithful, I will scatter you among the peoples, but if you return to me and keep my commandments and do them, though your outcasts are in the uttermost parts of heaven, from there I will gather them and bring them to the place that I have chosen, to make my name dwell there.”
5. Notice that Nehemiah was cupbearer to the king.

Nehemiah 2, Nehemiah Sent to Judah and Nehemiah Inspects Jerusalem’s Walls
1. As Nehemiah served wine to the king (and presumably the queen), he asked Nehemiah why he was sad.
2. Nehemiah replied that he wanted to be allowed to return to Judah to rebuild Jerusalem.
3. The king granted Nehemiah freedom to go and rebuild Jerusalem and he also provided him letters for safe passage “Beyond the River” and to be supplied with timber for construction.
4. When Nehemiah inspected Jerusalem’s walls and gates that were destroyed by fire, he confirmed the destruction and led the officials to the task and they agreed.
5. Opposition came from Sanballat, Tobiah, and Geshem; they accused Nehemiah and the officials of rebelling against the king.
6. Nehemiah replied he was led by the God of heaven and they will have no portion or right or claim in Jerusalem.

Nehemiah 3, Rebuilding the Wall
1. A huge labor force began restoring the walls and the gates with timbers for doors and gates, bolts and bars.
2. The repairs were done by residents opposite their own house.

Nehemiah 4, Opposition to the Work and the Work Resumes
1. The wall was built to half its height and the breaches were being closed.
2. Opposition became stiffer from Sanballat, Tobiah, and Geshem; they plotted together to come and fight against Jerusalem and to cause confusion in it.
3. It was said in Judah that there is too much rubble and we cannot build the wall by ourselves.
4. Nehemiah then stationed people by their clans, with swords, spears, and bows at the lowest parts of the wall and in the open spaces.
5. Nehemiah told the nobles, officials, and to the rest of the people not to be afraid of the opposition and return to work on the wall.
6. Nehemiah instructed half of the servants to work on the wall and half held the spears, shields, bows, and coats of mail; the leaders stood behind the whole house of Judah.
7. Those that carried burdens were loaded in such a way that each labored on the work with one hand and held his weapon with the other; each of the builders had his sword strapped to his side while he built.

Week #67; Wed, Apr 10: Nehemiah 5–10

Week #67; Wed, Apr 10: Nehemiah 5:1–10:39

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Famine strikes the land; people are desperate for food.
2. Nehemiah put a stop to charging the poor interest in times of hardships.
3. Nehemiah poured out his generosity on the impoverished people.
4. At the completion of the wall, the Feast of Booths was celebrated with Ezra reading each day from the Book of the Law.
5. Following confession of the sins of the people, a signed covenant was submitted committing the people to keep all the commandments of the Law along with its rules and statutes.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Nehemiah 5, Nehemiah Stops Oppression of the Poor and Nehemiah’s Generosity
1. A famine strikes as the Hebrews continued to rebuild Jerusalem’s gates and walls.
2. The poor sought relief for the hard times.
3. Nehemiah charged the nobles and officials for exacting interest on their brothers and insisted that it was not good.
4. He said, “Ought you not to walk in the fear of our God to prevent the taunts of the nations our enemies? Moreover, I and my brothers and my servants are lending them money and grain. Let us abandon this exacting of interest. Return to them this very day their fields, vineyards, olive orchards, houses, and the percentage of money, grain, wine and oil that you have been exacting from them.”
5. Then they said, “We will restore these and require nothing from them. We will do as you say.”
6. When Nehemiah himself was governor, he declined to accept the daily ration of 40 shekels of silver due him as other governors had received.
7. Many other expenses were absorbed by Nehemiah because the service was too heavy on this people.

Nehemiah 6, Conspiracy Against Nehemiah and the Wall is Finished
1. At the completion of the wall without any breaches, Sanballat, Tobiah, and Geshem wanted to meet Nehemiah in the plain of Ono where they could do him harm.
2. Four times they sent for Nehemiah to come down to meet them; Nehemiah remained focused on his mission and would not go.
3. Yet another invite was sent which included accusations that Nehemiah was intending to rebel and become king with prophets to proclaim him in Jerusalem.
4. Nehemiah denied the charge and rejected the invite to counsel together.
5. The work continued until the wall was finished; it took 52 days and the temple was put back in order.
6. But none of the houses had been rebuilt.

Nehemiah 7, Lists of Returned Exiles and Totals of Peoples and Gifts
1. Then Nehemiah was instructed by God to enroll the people by genealogy.
2. The whole assembly was 42,360 besides their male and female servants of whom there were 7,337.
3. Horses, mules, camels, and donkeys were also numbered.
4. Gold and silver vessels were given into the treasury.
5. So the priests, the Levites, the gatekeepers, the singers, and all Israel, lived in their own towns.

Nehemiah 8, Ezra Reads the Law, This Day is Holy, and Feast of Booths Celebrated
1. Ezra the scribe was told to bring the Book of the Law of Moses to the square by the Water Gate where he read to the assembly on a wooden platform built for that purpose.
2. Ezra read in sight of the people until midday; when he finished he blessed the Lord, the great God, and all the people answered, Amen, Amen, lifting up their hands.
3. Nehemiah, who was the governor, and Ezra the priest and scribe, and the Levites said to the people, “This day is holy to the Lord your God; do not mourn or weep.”
4. All the people wept as they heard the words of the Law.
5. Then he sent them away saying, “Go your way. Eat the fat and drink sweet wine and send portions to anyone who has nothing ready, for this day is holy to our Lord.”
6. The people went their way rejoicing, because they had understood the words that were declared to them.
7. At the allotted time, all the people who had returned from the captivity made booths and lived in the booths in accordance with what was written in the Law that the Lord had commanded Moses regarding the celebration of the Feast of Booths.
8. There was great rejoicing day by day for eight days while Ezra read from the Book of the Law of God.

Nehemiah 9, The People of Israel Confess Their Sins
1. While separating themselves from all foreigners, Israel stood and confessed their sins and the iniquities of their fathers and read from the Book of the Law of the Lord their God for a quarter of the day; for another quarter of it they made confession and worshiped the Lord their God.
2. The Levites and others called for the people to bless the Lord their God from everlasting to everlasting; to bless his glorious name, which is exalted above all blessing and praise.
3. As they confessed their sins, they praised thusly:
* You are the Lord, you alone.
* You have made heaven, the heaven of heavens with all their hosts.
* You are the Lord, the God who chose Abram and brought him out of Ur of the Chaldeans and gave him the name Abraham; you found his heart faithful before you.
* You made with him the covenant to give to his offspring the land of the Canaanite, the Hittite, the Amorite, the Perizzite, the Jebusite, and the Girgashite.
* And you have kept your promise, for you are righteous.
* And you saw the affliction of our fathers in Egypt and heard their cry at the Red Sea, and performed signs and wonders against Pharaoh and all his servants and all the people of his land, for you knew that they acted arrogantly against our fathers.
* And you made a name for yourself to this day.
* You divided the sea before them, so they went through the midst of the sea on dry land and you cast the pursuers into the depths.
* By a pillar of cloud you led them in the day, and by a pillar of fire in the night to light for them the way in which they should go.
* You came down from Mount Sinai and spoke with them from heaven and gave them right rules and true laws, good statutes and commandments, and you made know to them your holy Sabbath and commanded them commandments and statutes and a law by Moses your servant.
* You gave them bread from heaven for their hunger and brought water for them out of the rock for their thirst.
* You told them to go in to possess the land that you had sworn to give them.
* When our fathers stiffened their neck, did not obey your commandments, and wanted to return to Egypt into slavery, you demonstrated you are a God ready to forgive, gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love, and did not forsake them.
* Even when they had made for themselves a golden calf and said, ‘This is your God who brought you up out of Egypt’, and had committed great blasphemies, you in your great mercies did not forsake them in the wilderness.
* Forty years you sustained them in the wilderness, and they lacked nothing; their clothes did not wear out and their feet did not swell.
* And you gave them kingdoms and peoples and allotted to them every corner.
* You multiplied their children as the stars of heaven, and you brought them into the land that you had told their fathers to enter and possess.
* They went in and possessed the land, and you subdued before them the inhabitants of the land.
* Nevertheless, they were disobedient and rebelled against you and cast your law behind their back and killed your prophets; they committed great blasphemies.
* Therefore, you gave them into the hand of their enemies, who made them suffer.
* Yet when they turned and cried to you, you heard from heaven, and many times you delivered them according to your mercies, yet you did not make an end of them or forsake them for you are a gracious and merciful God.
* Now, therefore, our God, the great, the mighty, and the awesome God, who keeps covenant and steadfast love, let not all the hardship seem little to you that has come upon us.
* Behold, we are slaves this day; in the land you gave to our fathers to enjoy its fruit and its good gifts.
* Because of all this we make a firm covenant in writing; on the sealed document are the names of our princes, our Levites, and our priests.

Nehemiah 10, The People Who Sealed the Covenant and the Obligations of the Covenant
1. On the seals are the names of Nehemiah the governor, the priests, the Levites, and the chiefs of the people.
2. The obligations of the covenant included to walk in God’s Law that was given by Moses, and to do all the commandments of the Lord, and his rules and his statutes; and to give yearly all the offerings set by rules and statutes.

Week #68; Wed, Apr 17: Nehemiah 11–Esther 4

Week #68; Wed, Apr 17: Nehemiah 11:1–Esther 4:17

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. It appears that space was limited inside of Jerusalem for people to live.
2. At the dedication of the wall many who lived in villages surrounding Jerusalem had to be summoned for the celebration.
3. Contributions, first fruits, and the tithes were gathered.
4. Esther, an orphaned Jew cared for by Mordecai, becomes queen of Susa where Ahasuerus was a mighty king from India to Ethiopia.
5. When Mordecai a Jew defies the king and Haman by not bowing and paying homage, the king is persuaded by Haman to sign a decree to destroy all the Jews in the kingdom.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Nehemiah 11, The Leaders in Jerusalem and Villages Outside Jerusalem
1. The leaders of the people lived in Jerusalem; the rest of the people cast lots to bring one out of ten to live in Jerusalem the holy city, while nine out of ten remained in the other towns.
2. Certain sons of Judah and Benjamin lived in Jerusalem.
3. At least 2,760 (1/10) total lived inside the city of Jerusalem with duties as valiant men, priests, Levites, and gatekeepers.
4. The rest of Israel, priests, and Levites were in all the towns of Judah; 24,840 (9/10) of the total 27,760 (10/10).
5. The king commanded that a fixed portion be provided to the singers (the sons on Asaph, a name recorded with selected Psalms).

Nehemiah 12, Priests and Levites, Dedication of the Wall, and Service at the Temple
1. The priests and the Levites purified themselves, the people, the gates, and the wall.
2. At the dedication of the wall of Jerusalem the Levites and the singers were gathered to celebrate the dedication with gladness, thanksgiving, and singing.
3. Two great choirs were appointed to sing with trumpets and offer sacrifices; great joy was heard far away.
4. Contributions, first fruits, and the tithes were gathered in accordance with the portions required by the Law for the priests and for the Levites with portions to the singers and the gatekeepers.

Nehemiah 13, Nehemiah’s Final Reforms
1. On the day of the dedication of the wall, the Book of Moses was read in the hearing of the people.
2. When it was found that neither the Ammonites nor the Moabites should never enter the assembly of God, the people separated all those of foreign descent from their midst.
3. Eliashib the priest was appointed over the chambers of the house of God; however, he gave Tobiah a large chamber that was previously reserved for offerings by the people while Nehemiah was in Babylon visiting Artaxerxes the king.
4. When Nehemiah returned to Jerusalem, he discovered the evil done by Eliashib for Tobiah and became very angry.
5. Nehemiah threw out the possessions of Tobiah and brought back the vessels of the house of God, with the grain offering and the frankincense.
6. Nehemiah also discovered that the portions of the Levites and the singers had not been given to them, so he confronted the officials and reappointed reliable treasurers to the duties over the storehouses.
7. Then all of Judah brought the tithe of the grain, wine, and oil into the storehouses.
8. Nehemiah observed people treading winepresses, bringing in heaps of grain, and storing loads of fruit on the Sabbath and he warned them not to profane the Sabbath day and bring wrath on the city.
9. He saw Jews who had married women of Ashdod, Ammon, and Moab and he confronted them cursing, beating, and pulling out their hair.
10. He made them take an oath in the name of God, saying, “You shall not give your daughters to their sons, or take their daughters for your sons or for yourselves.”
11. Even though there was none like Nehemiah the king in all of Israel, foreign women made even him to sin.
12. But, he cleansed them from everything foreign, and established the duties of the priesthood and the covenant of the priesthood and the Levites.

Esther 1, The King’s Banquets and Queen Vashti’s Refusal
1. King Ahasuerus reigned from Susa the capital over 127 provinces from India to Ethiopia.
2. The king gave a feast for all of his officials for 180 days plus 7 more days for the people in the citadel, while Queen Vashti gave a feast for the women in the palace.
3. The king ordered his eunuchs to bring Queen Vashti before the king with her royal crown to show the people and the princes her beauty.
4. The queen refused.
5. Enraged, the king conferred with his wise men who determined that the queen had broken the law by not doing the command of the king.
6. They claimed that the queen’s behavior was wrong not only toward the king but she had offended all the officials by causing all of their women to look at their husbands with contempt.
7. They concluded that Queen Vashti be denied by a decree from the king not to come before the king and her royal position given to another.

Esther 2, Esther Chosen Queen and Mordecai Discovers a Plot
1. So, when the anger of the king abated, he was encouraged to select another queen and he was pleased to take the recommendation.
2. The entire kingdom was screened more than a year for a woman to take the place of Queen Vashti.
3. Esther, also known as Hadassah (she was a Jew who was taken by Mordecai the daughter of his uncle as his own daughter since she was without parents), was taken to the king’s palace where she made favor from the king’s people in charge and all who saw her.
4. When Esther went to see the king, he loved her more than all the women presented and he set the royal crown on her head and made her queen instead of Vashti.
5. The king gave a great feast for all of his officials and servants; it was Esther’s feast, complete with generous gifts.
6. Esther had not made known her kindred or her people, as Mordecai commanded her.
7. Later, Mordecai discovered a plot against the king by two of his eunuchs guarding the threshold.
8. Mordecai told Queen Esther who told the king in the name of Mordecai.
9. When investigated and confirmed, the men were both hanged on the gallows.

Esther 3, Haman Plots Against the Jews
1. Later, King Ahasuerus promoted Haman setting his throne above all the officials who were with him.
2. All of the king’s servants who were at the gate bowed down and paid homage to Haman for the king had commanded it so.
3. However, Mordecai did not bow down or pay homage to Haman because he was a Jew, thereby transgressing the king’s command.
4. Haman was infuriated at Mordecai and when Haman learned Mordecai was a Jew, he decided to destroy all the Jews throughout the whole kingdom of King Ahasuerus.
5. Haman told King Ahasuerus that a certain people are scattered in all the provinces of your kingdom; they do not keep the king’s laws because they have their own laws.
6. Haman sought a decree from King Ahasuerus to destroy the Jews and King Ahasuerus agreed placing his seal on letters to all provinces throughout the kingdom.
7. 10,000 talents were to be paid for the destruction of the Jews.

Esther 4, Esther Agrees to Help the Jews
1. Mordecai learned all that had been done and he went into great mourning along with all of the Jews in Ahasuerus’ kingdom.
2. When Esther learned from Mordecai about Haman’s plot, she was deeply distressed but she was persuaded by Mordecai to help the Jews.
3. Although it was against the law to go to the king without being called, she chose to go and plead for the Jews even though it may cost her life.
4. Mordecai said, “who knows whether you have not come to the kingdom for such a time as this?”
5. Esther told Mordecai to gather all the Jews in Susa and hold a three day fast on her behalf; Esther did likewise her young women.

Week #69; Wed, Apr 24: Esther 5–Job 4

Week #69; Wed, Apr 24: Esther 5:1–Job 4:21

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Esther gained approval of the king to hold a feast for the king and Haman the king’s most honored official.
2. Separately, Haman was highly aggravated at Mordecai because he refused to honor him, so at the urging of his wife and friends, he plotted to have Mordecai hanged.
3. The plot backfires however; Esther pins the destruction of her people on Haman before the king.
4. The king has Haman hung on his own gallows in the place of Mordecai.
5. Mordecai became 2nd in rank to King Ahasuerus and the Jews enacted a reverse edict on their enemies.
6. Job’s character was blameless and upright; he possessed very much and he was the greatest man in all the east.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Esther 5, Esther Prepares a Banquet and Haman Plans to Hang Mordecai
1. Esther won favor in the sight of the king and he granted her request to let the king and Haman come to a feast that she was preparing for the king; he promised to grant Esther any wish she wanted.
2. Haman’s pride began to swell and he bragged to his wife Zeresh and his friends.
3. But, Haman held out great wrath against Mordecai because he continued to neither rise nor tremble before him as he sat before the king’s gate.
4. Zeresh and all of his friends said to Haman, “Let a gallows fifty cubits high be made, and in the morning tell the king to have Mordecai hanged upon it. Then go joyfully with the king to the feast.”
5. Haman was pleased with the idea and he had the gallows made in front of his house.

Esther 6, The King Honors Mordecai
1. Meanwhile, the king was reminded that Mordecai had uncovered a plot against the king by two of his eunuchs, Bigthana and Teresh, to lay hands on the king.
2. King Ahasuerus then decided to place great honor on Mordecai for his loyalty to the king and he chose Haman to do all the honors.
3. Haman carried out the king’s commands but was brought low by this humbling turn of events; his wife and friends also poured scorn on Haman saying that he would fall before him.

Esther 7, Esther Reveals Haman’s Plot and Haman is Hanged
1. At the feast Esther prepared for the king and Haman, Esther was asked by the king to tell him her wish.
2. When Esther asked the king for relief for her and her people from the plot that Haman was using to destroy all the Jews, the king arose in wrath to the palace gardens.
3. Upon his return, the king sees Haman pleading to Esther and mistakes him for assaulting Esther.
4. Harbona, one of the king’s eunuchs, recommended that Haman’s gallows be used for Haman instead of Mordecai.
5. Haman was hanged on his own gallows that he prepared for Mordecai and the wrath of the king was abated.

Esther 8, Esther Saves the Jews
1. The king gave Esther the house of Haman and she set Mordecai over the house of Haman.
2. The king gave Mordecai his signet ring that he had given to Haman.
3. Esther went to the king and pleaded with him to stop the evil plan of Haman against the Jews.
4. The king told Mordecai to write an edict to enable the Jews to gather and defend themselves, to destroy and kill, to annihilate any armed force of any people or province that might attack them, children and women included, to plunder their goods, on one day throughout all the provinces of King Ahasuerus.
5. The Jews had gladness and joy in all 127 provinces from India to Ethiopia.

Esther 9, The Jews Destroy Their Enemies and The Feast of Purim Inaugurated
1. On Adar (month) 13 (day) when the king’s edict was about to be carried out, the Jews gathered in their cities throughout the provinces of the king and struck all their enemies with the sword, killing and destroying them, and did as they pleased to those who hated them.
2. A second day was allotted to the Jews when Queen Esther asked the king to grant more time for the Jews to perform the king’s edict; she also requested that Haman’s ten sons be hanged on the gallows.
3. The king agreed to grant Esther and the Jews a second day to act out the edict that Mordecai had distributed.
4. 75,000 were killed in the king’s provinces and 800 were killed in Susa, the citadel of the king.

Esther 10, The Greatness of Mordecai
1. Mordecai was advanced to second in rank to King Ahasuerus; Mordecai became great among the Jews and popular with the multitude of his brothers, for he sought the welfare of his people and spoke peace to all his people.

Job 1, Job’s Character and Wealth, Satan Allowed to Test Job, and Satan Takes Job’s Property and Children
1. Job lived in the land of Uz and was blameless and upright; he feared God and turned away from evil.
2. Job was the greatest man that lived in the east.
3. Job had 7 sons and 3 daughters; he possessed 7,000 sheep, 3,000 camels, 500 yoke of oxen, 500 female donkeys, and very many servants.
4. Job would rise early in the morning and offer burnt offerings on behalf of all of his children in the event that they may have sinned, and cursed God in their hearts; he did this continually.
5. When the sons of God came to present themselves before the Lord, Satan appeared among them.
6. The Lord said to Satan, “Have you considered my servant Job, that there is none like him on the earth, a blameless and upright man, who fears God and turns away from evil?”
7. Satan challenged God accusing the Lord of giving Job special protections for Job and his family and possessions.
8. The Lord gave Satan free reign over Job’s household to test his character and wealth; except for Job’s life.
9. Satan smote Job’s children, servants, and livestock, but Job did not sin, he worshiped the Lord saying, “Naked I came from my mother’s womb, and naked shall I return. The Lord gave, and Lord has taken away; blessed be the name of the Lord.”

Job 2, Satan Attacks Job’s Health and Job’s Three Friends
1. Satan was unrelenting; he attacks Job’s health by striking him with loathsome sores from the sole of his foot to the crown of his head.
2. Job’s wife told him to curse God and die; however, he rebuked her saying, “Shall we receive good from God, and shall we not receive evil?”
3. Yet, Job did not sin with his lips.
4. But, Job had three friends, Eliphaz, Bildad, and Zophar who came to show him sympathy and comfort him.

Job 3, Job Laments His Birth
1. Job opened his mouth and cursed the day he was born with much agony and detail.

Job 4, Eliphaz Speaks: The Innocent Prosper
1. Eliphaz responds to Job asking if he has lost his patience because calamity has come.
2. Eliphaz states that Job’s fear of God should be his confidence and his integrity should be his hope.
3. Eliphaz reasons that those who plow iniquity and sow trouble reap the same, suggesting that Job may have brought about his condition upon himself.
4. Eliphaz asks Job, “Can mortal man be in the right before God? Can a man be pure before his Maker?”

Week #70; Wed, May 01: Job 5–15

Week #70; Wed, May 01: Job 5:1–15:35

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Job’s suffering is severe; he has already questioned why he did not die at birth.

2. Isaiah 14:12-23 accounts for the war in heaven and the fall of Lucifer and his followers; the angels of darkness.

3. It appears that Job does not consider that since that time, Lucifer, his adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour (Job 1:7, 1 Peter 5:6-11).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Job 4-5, Eliphaz Speaks: The Innocent Prosper (cont.)
1. Elephaz speaks first after a long silence by Job’s three visiting friends; Elephaz encourages Job to seek God for relief.

2. Elephaz tries to spell out the good in being reproved by God and to not despise the discipline of the Almighty.

Job 6, Job Replies: My Complaint is Just

1. Job holds on to innocence saying, “I have not denied the words of the Holy One.”

2. Job asks, “Is there any injustice on my tongue?”

Job 7, Job Continues: My Life Has No Hope
1. Job express hopelessness; “my eye will never again see good.”

2. Job says, “I will not restrain my mouth; I will speak in the anguish of my spirit; I will complain in the bitterness of my soul.”

Job 8, Bildad Speaks: Job Should Repent

1. Bildad speaks next saying, “If you will seek God and plead with the Almighty for mercy, if you are pure and upright, surely then he will rouse himself for you and restore your rightful habitation.”

2. Bildad said, “God will not reject a blameless man, nor take the hand of evildoers.”

Job 9, Job Replies: There Is No Arbiter
1. Job acknowledged Bildad and affirmed his position.

2. However, Job asked, “How can a man be in the right before God? . . . If one wished to contend with him, one could not answer him once in a thousand times.”

Job 10, Job Continues: A Plea to God
1. Job exclaims, “I loathe my life; I will give free utterance to my complaint; I will speak in the bitterness of my soul.”

2. Job pleads to God, “Do not condemn me; let me know why you contend against me . . . Cease and leave me alone.”

Job 11, Zophar Speaks: You Deserve Worse
1. Lastly, Zophar speaks to Job saying, “God exacts of you less than your guilt deserves.”

2. Zophar asked, “Can you find out the deep things of God? . . . Can you find out the limit of the Almighty?”

Job 12, Job Replies: The Lord Has Done This
1. Job replies to Zophar, “But I have understanding as well as you; I am not inferior to you . . . What you know, I also know; I am not inferior to you.”

2. Job says, “I desire to argue my case with God.”

Job 13, Job Continues: Still I Will Hope in God
1. Job exclaims to his three friends, “As for you, you whitewash with lies; worthless physicians are you all.”

2. Further, Job says, “Oh that you would keep silent, and it would be your wisdom.”

Job 14, Job Continues: Death Comes Soon to All
1. Job asked, “Who can bring a clean thing out of an unclean? . . . There is none.”

2. Job said, “Oh that you would hide me in Sheol, that you would conceal me until your wrath be past, that you would appoint me a set time and remember me!

Job 15, Eliphaz Accuses: Job Does Not Fear God
1. Eliphaz charges Job with “windy knowledge . . . Do you limit wisdom to yourself?”

2. Eliphaz asserts, “Should he (a man) argue in unprofitable talk, or in words with which he can do no good?

3. Eliphaz concludes, “Let him not trust in emptiness, deceiving himself, for emptiness will be his payment.”

Week #71; Wed, May 8: Job 16–28

Week #71; Wed, May 08: Job 16:1–28:22

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Job continues to hold out that God is giving him his grief (unaware of Satan striking a deal with God as a test of Job’s faith).

2. In addition to Job’s infirmities, it appears that Job is severely handicapped by not knowing that God and Satan have undergone a test of Job’s faith; Job is blindly fighting for his soul.

3. Job’s friend’s are likewise unaware that Job has been placed in position between God and Satan as a test.

4. Job holds fast to his integrity in the face of criticism by his friends and ultimately identifies all wisdom is from God, not his outspoken friends.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Job 16, Job Replies: Miserable Comforters Are You
1. “Wendy words” is the term used by Job to describe his comforters.

2. Job said, “I could speak as you do, if you were in my place . . .”

3. Job firmly holds out that God has given him up to the ungodly and casts him in the hands of the wicked.

Job 17, Job Continues: Where Then Is My Hope?

1. Job says, “My spirit is broken; my days are extinct; the graveyard is ready for me.

2. Speaking to his friends, Job says, “I shall not find a wise man among you. My days are past; my plans are broken off, the desires of my heart.”

Job 18, Bildad Speaks: God Punishes the Wicked
1. Bildad thinks that the “light of the wicked (Job) is put out, and the flame of his fire does not shine . . . The light is dark in his tent, and his lamp above him is put out.”

2. But Bildad is unaware of the power of Job’s faith and the power of his God.

3. Bildad accuses Job of being unrighteous, and knows not God.

Job 19, Job Replies: My Redeemer Lives
1. But, Job sees through Bildad’s words and retorts that he should be ashamed for casting reproach upon him.

2. Job continues to lament over lost brothers, friends, relatives, guests, and maidservants saying, “the hand of God has touched me!”

3. Job powerfully states, “For I know that my Redeemer lives, and at the last he will stand upon the earth. And after my skin has been thus destroyed, yet in my flesh I shall see God, whom I shall see for myself, and my eyes shall behold, and not another.”

Job 20, Zophar Speaks: The Wicked Will Suffer
1. Zophar also denounces Job stating, “I hear censure that insults me; the wicked will perish forever. . . . they will get no enjoyment. . . . God will send his burning anger against him and rain it upon him into his body.”

2. Zophar asserts, “This is the wicked man’s portion from God, the heritage decreed for him by God.”

Job 21, Job Replies: The Wicked Do Prosper
1. Job retorts, “mock on, but listen to my words.”

2. Job states about the wicked, “Why do the wicked live, reach old age, and grow mighty in power? . . . Their offspring are established in their presence, and their descendants before their eyes. . . . What is the Almighty, that we should serve him? . . . And what profit do we get if we pray to him? . . . How often is it that the lamp of the wicked is put out? . . . Will any teach God knowledge?”

3. Job exclaims, “How then will you comfort me with empty nothings? . . . There is nothing left of your answers but falsehood.”

Job 22, Eliphaz Speaks: Job’s Wickedness Is Great
1. Eliphaz snaps back, “Can a man be profitable to God?”

2. Eliphaz tells Job, “Agree with God, and be at peace; there good will come to you. . . . Receive instruction from his mouth, and lay up his words in your heart. . . . You will make your prayer to him, and he will hear you, and you will pay your vows. . . . light will shine on your ways.”

Job 23, Job Replies: Where Is God?
1. Job says, “I would lay my case before him and fill my mouth with arguments. I would know what he would answer me and understand what he would say to me.”

2. Job continues, “There an upright man could argue with him, and I would be acquitted forever by my judge.”

3. Job surmises, “I am in dread of him; God has made my heart faint; the Almighty has terrified me; yet I am not silenced because of the darkness, nor because thick darkness covers my face.”

Job 24, Job Continues: Why Are Not Times of Judgment Kept By The Almighty:
1. Job questioned, “Why do those who know him never see his days?”

2. In his confidence, Job says, “If it is not so, who will prove me a liar and show that there is nothing in what I say?”

Job 25, Bildad Speaks: Man Cannot Be Righteous
1. Bildad states, “Dominion and fear are with God; he makes peace in his high heaven. . . . How then can man be in the right before God?”

2. Bildad asked, “How can he who is born of woman (into humanity) be pure?”

Job 26, Job Replies: God’s Majesty is Unsearchable
1. Job answered Bildad, “With whose help have you uttered words, and whose breath has come out from you?”

2. Job assesses, “The thunder of God’s power, who can understand?”

Job 27, Job Continues: I Will Maintain My Integrity
1. Job took up more discourse saying, “I hold fast my righteousness and will not let it go; my heart does not reproach me for any of my days.”

2.  Job teaches of the, “hand of God against the wicked and the heritage that oppressors receive from the Almighty (the list is extensive and horrifying).”

Job 28, Job Continues: Where Is Wisdom?
1. Job declares, “God understands the way to it (wisdom), and he knows its place. . . . For he looks to the ends of the earth and sees everything under the heavens.”

2. Job announces that, “God said to man, ‘Behold, the fear of the Lord, that is wisdom, and to turn away from evil is understanding.'”

Week #72; Wed, May 15: Job 39-39

Week #72; Wed, May 15: Job 29:1–39:30

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Job is convinced his “works” justify his righteous position; he resumes his defense by asserting the “good” he remembers doing in “the months of old” and the honor that was bestowed on him by observers.

2. Elihu, a younger observer, follows Job’s three friends with more focused comments on Job’s friends as well as on Job, still Job holds on to his righteous position–that he does not deserve his condition because of his goodness and kindness for which he is very proud.

3. Elihu’s pronouncements, statements, and assertions appear to lack the elements of grace and mercy.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Job 29, Job’s Summary Defense
1. Job laments the “good old days” as he resumes his righteous defense.

2. He recalls how young, old, nobels, and princes honored him at the gate of the city when he was in his prime.

3. Job “posts” his own books tallying his deliveries to the poor, fatherless, perishing, widows, blind, lame, and needy.

4. Job reflects pride in the “balance sheet” he has drawn up for himself.

Job 30, Job Continues His Summary Defense
1. But, in his current state of infirmities, these same men laugh at him.

2. These same admirers now keep aloof and spit at his sight.

3. As they promote his calamity; they need no help from others.

4. Job’s honor and prosperity has passed away like a cloud before the wind.

5. Job’s days of affliction have taken hold of him; his soul is poured out within him.

Job 31, Job’s Final Appeal
1. Job asks, “Is not calamity for the unrighteous, and disaster for workers of iniquity?”

2. Job made a self-determination that his deeds are on the positive side of his ledger page, so he seeks a just balance to let God know his integrity.

3. So confident is Job that he places his own wife at risk for harm by others if his own personal assessment has overlooked any falsehood in his past.

4. Job’s confidence extends to each and every action in his past holding on to dealing justly to the poor, widows, fatherless, or needy without fear of further harm to himself.

5. Job includes justly using his gold in his past transactions as punishable by the judges if he had been false to God above.

Job 32, Elihu Rebukes Job’s Three Friends
1. Job was righteous in his own eyes, so the three men ceased to answer him.

2. Then Elihu burned with anger toward Job because he justified himself rather than God; he burned with anger also at Job’s three friends because they had found no answer, although they had declared Job to be in the wrong.

3. Being younger than Job’s three friends, Elihu waited until they finished speaking to Job before he spoke.

4. Elihu declared that it is the spirit in man, the breath of the Almighty, that makes him understand.

Job 33, Elihu Rebukes Job
1. Elihu tells Job, “God is greater than man; he opens the ears of men and terrifies them with warnings, that he may turn man aside from his deed(s) and conceal pride from a man; he keeps back his soul from the pit, his life from perishing by the sword.”

2. “Behold, God does all these things, twice, three times, with a man, to bring back his soul from the pit, that he may be lighted with the light of life.”

Job 34, Elihu Asserts God’s Justice
1. Elihu pronounces to Job and his three friends, “Far be it from God that he should do wickedness, and from the Almighty that he should do wrong.”

2. Elihu states that God’s justice consists of this, “according to the work of a man he will repay him, and according to his ways he will make it befall him.”

3. Elihu asserts that God’s “eyes are on the ways of a man, and he sees all his steps . . . He shatters the mighty without investigation, and . . . He strikes them for their wickedness in a place for all to see, because they turned aside from following him and had no regard for any of his ways . . . ”

Job 35, Elihu Condemns Job
1. So, Elihu now applies his thinking to Job.

2. Many “ifs” are used by Elihu to define Job’s position and the action or lack of action by God; a sign of a need for additional wisdom by Elihu too.

3. Elihu concludes that Job “opens his mouth in empty talk; he multiplies words without knowledge.”

Job 36, Elihu Extols God’s Greatness
1. Elihu pridefully concludes that, “truly my words are not false; one who is perfect in knowledge is with you.”

2. Elihu says, “God is mighty, and does not despise any; he is mighty on strength of understanding.”

3. Elihu cautions against arrogance; “You are full of the judgment on the wicked . . . and . . . judgment and justice seize you.”

4. Elihu adds, “Behold, God is exalted in his power; who is a teacher like him? Who has prescribed for him his way, or who can say, ‘You have done wrong’?

Job 37, Elihu Proclaims God’s Majesty
1. Elihu tells more, “Keep listening to the thunder of his voice and the rumbling that comes from his mouth.”

2. Elihu tells Job to, “stop and consider the wondrous works of God (i.e., lightning, wind, cold, heat, ice, waters, clouds, skies, light, etc.)”

3. Elihu adds, “God is clothed with awesome majesty. The almighty–we cannot find him; he is great in power; justice and abundant righteousness he will not violate. Therefore men fear him; he does not regard any who are wise in their own conceit.”

Job 38, The Lord Answers Job
1. Then, unexpectedly, God answered Job out of the whirlwind and said, “Who is this that darkens counsel by words without knowledge? . . . I will question you, and you make it known to me. Where were you when I laid the foundation of the earth? . . . Who determined it’s measurements? . . . Or the line on it? . . . Who laid its cornerstone?”

2. Upon adding many other unanswerable questions to Job, God told him, “Declare, if you know all this.”

Job 39, The Lord Answers Job (cont.)
1. God follows with many more unanswerable questions for Job.

2. It appears that God is stripping Job of all his pride to get him to a level where he understands where he should stand (or lay prostrate in humility) before God.

Week #73; Wed, May 22: Job 40-Psalm 17

Week #73; Wed, May 22: Job 40:1-Psalm 17:15

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Job demonstrates that living blamelessly under the law by itself is not sufficient without the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ and faith in Him for salvation.

2. Job acknowledges man has no defense against the Lord God Almighty.

3. Job’s three friends also come to realize that their judgment was insufficient for providing any meaningful help to Job; according to God, they were dealing with a few cards short of a full deck too.

4. It is clear, confession and repentance from a contrite heart is what God seeks from all of us.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Job 40, The Lord Continues to Address Job–Job Promises Silence
1. The Lord questions Job, “Shall a faultfinder contend with the Almighty?”

2. Job finally realizes he has overstepped with the Almighty and declares “no contest” as he covers his month and proceeds no further in his own defense.

3. The Lord answered Job out of a whirlwind and said, “I will question you, and you make it known to me.”

4. God said, “Will you even put me in the wrong, will you condemn me that you may be in the right?”

5. God ask Job, “Have you an arm like God, and can you thunder with a voice like his?”

Job 41, The Lord Challenges Job
1.  God states, “. . . Since both the Behemoth and the Leviathan are impossible for man to tame; then who can stand before God who created them . . . ?”

2. God says to Job, “These creatures know no fear; they are king over all the sons of pride.”

Job 42, Job Confesses and Repents
1. Job comes to an understanding, “I have uttered what I did not understand, things too wonderful for me, which I did not know–I despise myself, and repent in dust and ashes.”

2. Then the Lord rebukes Job’s three friends saying to Eliphaz, “My anger burns against you and against your two friends, for you have not spoken of me what is right, as my servant Job has; take seven bulls and seven rams and go to Job and offer up a burnt offering for yourselves. Job will pray for you, and I will accept his prayer not to deal with you according to your folly.”

3. “And the Lord restored the fortunes of Job, when he had prayed for his friends. And the Lord gave Job twice as much as he had before.”

Psalm 1, The Way of the Righteous and the Wicked
1. The man that delights in the law of the Lord and meditates day and night is like a tree that is planted by a stream and does not wither; it gives fruit in its season.

2. But the wicked are like chaff that will not stand in the judgment, for the Lord knows the way of the righteous, but the way of the wicked will perish.

Psalm 2, The Reign of the Lord’s Anointed
1. Why do nations rage, plotting in vain.

2. They plot against the Lord and his Anointed.

3. The Lord says, “I have set my King on Zion, my holy hill.”

4. Therefore, “Blessed are all who take refuge in him, lest he be angry, and you perish in the way because his wrath is quickly kindled.”

Psalm 3, Save Me, O My God
1. David declared, “Salvation belongs to the Lord; your blessing be on your people!”

2. As he fled from his son Absalom, he lamented, “O Lord, how many are my foes! Many are rising against me; many are saying of my soul, there is no salvation for him in God.”

3. He declared, “But you, O Lord, are a shield about me, my glory, and the lifter of my head.”

4. David said, “I cried aloud to the Lord and he answered me from his holy hill; . . . the Lord sustained me.”

Psalm 4, Answer Me When I Call
1. David seeks God asking him to hear his prayer and answer him when he calls.

2. He pleads over his honor that has been turned to shame because of vain words and lies of men.

3. David proclaims that the Lord has set apart the godly for himself; that the Lord hears him when he calls.

4. He states, “Offer right sacrifices and put your trust in the Lord.”

5. His prayer promises commitment, “I will both lie down and sleep; for you alone, O Lord, make me dwell in safety.”

Psalm 5, Lead Me In Your Righteousness
1. David cries out to the Lord in prayer stating that, “you are not a God who delights in wickedness; evil may not dwell with you . . . the boastful shall not stand before your eyes; you hate all evildoers . . . you destroy those who speak lies; the Lord abhors the bloodthirsty and deceitful man.”

2. David states, “I will enter your house, I will bow down toward your holy temple in fear of you.”

3. He asks for the Lord to lead him in righteousness because of his enemies; making straight his way before him.

4. David adds, “Let all who take refuge in you rejoice; let them ever sing for joy, and spread your protection over them, that those who love your name may exult in you.”

Psalm 6, O Lord, Deliver My Life
1. David prays as he is languishing, “. . . heal me, O Lord, for my bones are troubled . . . my soul also is greatly troubled–how long?.”

2. He states, “Depart from me, all you workers of evil . . . The Lord has heard my plea; the Lord accepts my prayer . . . all my enemies shall be ashamed and greatly troubled; they shall turn back and be put to shame in a moment.”

3. David makes a profound statement here about “death” that portends eternal death where there is no remembrance of the Lord–grim outlook where it applies!

Psalm 7, In You do I Take Refuge
1. David commits to God for a refuge to save him from all his pursuers and to deliver him from his pursuers.

2. David hints of some of Job’s righteousness and integrity; however, he quickly grasps the need to repent saying, “If a man does not repent, God will whet his sword; he has bent and readied his bow; he has prepared for him his deadly weapons, making his arrows fiery shafts.”

3. He states, “I will give to the Lord the thanks due to his righteousness, and I will sing praise to the name of the Lord, the Most High.”

Psalm 8, How Majestic Is Your Name
1. David applies his best thoughts to reflect on the majesty of God; he compared it to being over the heavens, infants, works of his fingers, moon, stars, angels, beasts, and fish of the sea.

2. He summarizes by saying, “O Lord, our Lord, how majestic is your name in all the earth!”

Psalm 9, I Will Recount Your Wonderful Deeds
1. David writes that he “will give thanks to the Lord with his whole heart; will recount his wonderful deeds, exult in him, and sing praise to his name, O Most High.”

2. David states, “You have rebuked the nations; you have made the wicked perish; you have blotted out their name forever and ever; . . . the very name of them has perished.”

3. He acknowledged, “But the Lord sits enthroned forever; he has established his throne for justice, and he judges the world with righteousness; he judges the people with uprightness.”

4. David proclaims, “The Lord is a stronghold for the oppressed, a stronghold in times of trouble . . . He does not forget the cry of the afflicted . . . whereas, the wicked are snared in the work of their own hands . . . the wicked shall return to Sheol, all the nations that forget God.”

5. David prays, “Put them in fear, O Lord! Let the nations know that they are but men!”

Psalm 10, Why Do You Hide Yourself?
1. Note: Psalm 9 and 10 together follow the Hebrew alphabet with the first letter of each verse forming one Psalm.

2. David asks God, “Why, O Lord, do you stand far away? . . . Why do you hide yourself in times of trouble?”

3. Thinking deeper, David declares, “The wicked do not seek God and his thoughts are, ‘There is no God. . . I shall not be moved; throughout all generations, I shall not meet adversity . . . God has forgotten, he has hidden his face, he will never see it.'”

4. David turns to prayer, “Arise, O Lord; O God, lift up you hand; forget not the afflicted . . . You do see, for you note mischief and vexation that you may take it into your hands.”

5. David concludes, “Incline your ear to do justice to the fatherless and the oppressed, so that man who is of the earth may strike terror no more.”

Psalm 11, The Lord Is In His Holy Temple
1. David affirms, “The Lord is in his holy temple; the Lord’s throne is in heaven; his eyes see, his eyelids test the children of man . . . The Lord tests the righteous, but his soul hates the wicked and the one who loves violence.”

2. David asserts, “For the Lord is righteous; he loves righteous deeds; the upright shall behold his face.”

Psalm 12, The Faithful Have Vanished
1. David proclaims, “Save, O Lord, for the godly one is gone; for the faithful have vanished from among the children of man.”

2. The Lord says, “I will now arise; I will place the plundered and needy in safety for which he longs.”

3. David confirms, “You, O Lord, will keep them; you will guard us from this generation forever.”

Psalm 13, How Long, O Lord?
1. Feeling abandoned, David prays, “How long, O Lord? Will you forget me forever? How long will you hide your face from me?”

2. He says, “Consider and answer me, O Lord my God; . . . lest my enemy say, ‘I have prevailed over him,’ lest my foes rejoice because I am shaken.”

3. David reflects, “But I have trusted in your steadfast love; my heart shall rejoice in your salvation . . . I will sing to the Lord, because he has dealt bountifully with me.”

Psalm 14, The Fool Says, There Is No God
1. David declares, “The fool says in his heart, ‘There is no God.'”

2. David exhorts the fools, “They are corrupt, they do abominable deeds, there is none who does good, not even one.”

3. David exclaims, “God is with the generation of the righteous.”

4. David surmised, “Oh, that salvation for Israel would come out of Zion! When the Lord restores the fortunes of his people, let Jacob rejoice, let Israel be glad.”

Psalm 15, Who Shall Dwell On Your Holy Hill?
1. David ponders, “Who shall dwell on your holy hill? . . . He who walks blamelessly and does what is right and speaks truth in his heart? . . . He who does not slander or does no evil to his neighbor? . . . He who does not take up reproach against his friend?”

2. David visits other thoughts, “He who does not put out his money at interest and does not take a bribe against the innocent.”

3. David resolves, “He who does these things shall never be moved.”

Psalm 16, You Will Not Abandon My Soul
1. David pleas, “Preserve me, O God, for in you I take refuge.”

2. He says, “You are my Lord; I have no good apart from you.”

3. David applauds the saints in the land, the excellent ones, however, those that run after another god, although they multiply, their drink offerings of blood I will not pour out or take their names on my lips.”

4. He says, “I have set the Lord always before me; because he is at my right hand, I shall not be shaken.”

5. David affirms, “You will not abandon my soul to Sheol, or let your holy one see corruption.”

Psalm 17, In the Shadow of Your Wings
1. David prays, “Keep me as the apple of your eye; hide me in the shadow of your wing, from the wicked who do me violence, my deadly enemies who surround me.”

2. He says, “Deliver my soul from the wicked by your sword, from men by your hand, O Lord from men of the world whose portion is in this life.”

3. He concludes, “As for me, I shall behold your face in righteousness; when I awake, I shall be satisfied with your likeness.”

Week #74; Wed, May 29: Psalm 18–33

Week #74; Wed, May 29: Psalm 18:1-33:32

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Here in Psalm 18 we see that some things, like the love God, the love of the Spirit of God, and/or the love of a particular person(s) just cannot be denied; you know it when you know it (it wells up inside when there is not just a connection, but a relationship), so be it.

2. The Spirit of God bonds the connection between the Lord and David into a special relationship that Psalm 18 describes; however, we know David strayed when he was king.

3. Reason with this on the difference about the Holy Spirit in the days of the Old Testament where we see that then the Holy Spirit did not indwell permanently like it does today in the New Testament (Ephesians 1:13-14).

3. Try reading or reciting the 23rd Psalm in “plurality” for a slightly broader application to David’s thoughts.

4. David asserts that the nation whose God is the Lord are the people chosen to be his heritage; he fashions their hearts (33:12, 15).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Psalm 18, The Lord Is My Rock and My Fortress
1. David said, “I love you, O Lord, my strength” because he could feel it in his soul–when he knew it, he knew it–there was connection, two-way communication, and complete relationship.

2.David compared his love for the Lord to his strength, rock, fortress, deliverer, refuge, shield, horn, and stronghold.

3. When at great risk from his enemies (and Saul), David called out to the Lord and the Lord heard him.

4. The Lord responded in anger so that smoke and fire came forth from Him coming swiftly on the the wings of the wind with darkness His covering bring hailstones and coals as He thundered sending out His arrows to scatter and route David’s enemies.

5. David declares that the Lord is merciful, blameless, pure, and steadfast.

Psalm 19, The Law of the Lord Is Perfect
1. David states, “The heavens declare the glory of God and the sky above proclaims his handiwork.”

2. “The law of the Lord is perfect.” declares David, it revives the soul; in keeping all the rules there is great reward.

3. So, “Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in your sight, O Lord, my rock and my redeemer.” concludes David.

Psalm 20, Trust in the Name of the Lord Our God
1. David encourages all of the Lord’s anointed to trust in the name of the Lord our God instead of chariots and in horses.

2. Therefore, when you do, David prays that the Lord will grant you your heart’s desire and fulfill all your plans.

3. Then, he says, “. . . make offerings, shout for joy, hoist banners . . . giving praise to the Lord.”

Psalm 21, The King Rejoices in the Lord’s Strength
1. Rich blessings and a golden crown awaits those who rejoice in the strength and salvation in the Lord.

2. The Most High shall not be moved, He shall make your enemies a blazing oven, fire will consume them.

Psalm 22, Why Have You Forsaken Me?
1. Like Job, David asks God, “. . . why have you forsaken me? . . . Yet you are holy, enthroned on the praises of Israel.”

2. “Strong bulls of Bashan surround me; they open wide their mouths at me, like a ravening and roaring lion.

3. Note how verse 18 pertains to the New Testament and the cross where it says, “. . . they divide my garments among them, and for my clothing they cast lots . . .”

4. David firmly holds on to this thought, “. . . It shall be told of the Lord to the coming generation; they shall come and proclaim his righteousness to a people yet unborn . . . ”

Psalm 23, The Lord Is My Shepherd
1. Only two adjectives (green and still) are used in Psalm 23 making it very directive toward our souls (the Lord’s prize from every elect, chosen, and predestined written in the Lamb’s Book of Life).

2. The eternal focus (“I shall dwell in the house of the Lord forever.”) is the bottom line.

Psalm 24, The King of Glory
1. David asks, “Who is this King of glory?”

2. He answers, “The earth is the Lord’s and the fullness thereof, the world and those who dwell therein, for he has founded it upon the seas and established it upon the rivers.”

3. So, he resolves, “The Lord of hosts, he is the King of glory!” Amen.

Psalm 25, Teach Me Your Paths
1. In seeking the ways of the Lord, David pleads, “Remember not the sins of my youth or my transgressions; according to your steadfast love remember me, for the sake of your goodness, O Lord!”

2. Further, he says, “Pardon my guilt, for it is great . . . My eyes are ever toward the Lord.”

Psalm 26, I Will Bless the Lord
1. David says, “As for me, I shall walk in my integrity; redeem me, and be gracious to me.”

2. He adds, “My foot stands on level ground; in the great assembly I will bless the Lord.”

Psalm 27, The Lord Is My Light and My Salvation
1. When the Lord is your Light and Salvation, David says, “. . . whom shall I fear? . . . The Lord is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?”

2. So, “Wait for the Lord; be strong, and let your heart take courage; wait for the Lord!”

Psalm 28, The Lord Is My Strength and My Shield
1. David says, “The Lord is my strength and my shield; in him my heart trusts, and I am helped; my heart exults, and with my song I give thanks to him.”

2. David carves out the Lords people from those that are wicked by saying, “The lord is the strength of his people; he is the saving refuge of his anointed.”

Psalm 29, Ascribe to the Lord Glory
1. David compares the voice of the Lord to being over the waters like thunder, powerfully breaking the cedars of Lebanon, flashing forth flames of fire, shaking the wilderness, making the deer give birth, and stripping the forest bare.

2. So, he says, “The Lord sits enthroned over the flood; the Lord sits enthroned as king forever.”

3. And may, “The Lord bless his people with peace!”

Psalm 30, Joy Comes with the Morning
1. In dedicating the temple, David states, “Sing praises to the Lord, O you his saints, and give thanks to his holy name. For his anger is but for a moment, and his favor is for a lifetime.”

2. And, “O Lord my God, I will give thanks to you forever!”

Psalm 31, Into Your Hand I Commit My Spirit
1. David calls on the Lord to, “Be a rock of refuge for me, a strong fortress to save me!”

2. He exclaims, “Into your hand I commit my spirit; you have redeemed me, O Lord, faithful God.”

3. So, “Love the Lord, all you his saints! The Lord preserves the faithful but abundantly repays the one who acts in pride. Be strong, and let you heart take courage, all you who wait for the Lord.”

Psalm 32, Blessed Are the Forgiven
1. David asserts how it is the forgiven that are blessed, the ones whose sins are forgiven.

2. He zeroes in on the upright in heart, “Those people are the ones whose spirit contains no deceit; they acknowledge their sin to the Lord completely . . . they confess their transgressions and receive forgiveness for the iniquity of their sins.”

3. David reasons, “Be not like a horse or a mule, without understanding, which must be curbed with bit and  bridle, or it will not stay near you.”

Psalm 33, The Steadfast Love of the Lord
1. Lastly, David says to, “Shout for joy in the Lord, O you righteous! Praise befits the upright.”

2. David explains this is done with lyre, harp, singing, and loud shouts, for the “word of the Lord is upright and all his work is done in faithfulness.”

3. David says, “Let all the earth fear the Lord; let all the inhabitants of the world stand in awe of him! For he spoke, and it came to be; he commanded, and it stood firm (Genesis 1:3).”

 

Week #75; Wed, Jun 05: Psalm 34-49

Week #75; Wed, Jun 05: Psalm 34:1-49:20

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

1. Psalms has five sections (1-41, 42-72, 73-89, 90-106, and 107-150) that each close with a doxology.

2. Psalm 34 pertains to the time of 1 Samuel 21 that records David taking the holy bread, his flight to Gath with the sword of Goliath, and pretending to be mad when arriving at Gath. It is another acrostic poem that uses successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet to begin each verse.

3. Psalm 37 draws clear distinction about the rewards for the meek and punishment of evildoers that leaves no room for wiggle.

4. Psalm 38 brings Job 6:4 and 23:4 to mind regarding the wrath of God being against him. But is there more to it? Is another evil element involved?

5. Psalm 40 refers to the “scroll of the book” and about what is written of him pertaining to Luke 24:44 and fulfillment of prophecy.

6. Psalm 41 ends with a doxology that blesses the Lord, the God of Israel, from everlasting to everlasting.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Psalm 34, Taste and See That the Lord is Good
1. David pleas with the reader to exalt the Lord together and magnify the Lord with him.

2. He sought the Lord, and He answered him and delivered him from all his fears.

3. The “angel of the Lord” [some read as Jesus in the OT] encamps around those who “fear” and “delivers” them.

4. Taking refuge in the Lord is a blessing; fearing Him results in lacking nothing.

5. To learn to fear the Lord, keep your tongue and lips from evil, turn away from evil, do good, seek peace and pursue it.

6. This is the insight, “Affliction will slay the wicked, and those who hate the righteous will be condemned.”

Psalm 35, Great Is The Lord
1. David seeks the Lord to help him fight against those who fight against him.

2. The term “angel of the Lord” is used again when David calls for help to drive away his enemies like chaff before the wind and again when he envisions the way of the enemy as dark and slippery when they are being pursued.

3. David uses the term “soul” to reflect the depth of his communications with the Lord.

4. He portrays how his enemies have dug a pit and hid their net “without cause” to ensnare him.

5. His enemies repay him evil for good even though he prayed, fasted and wore sackcloth when they were sick.

6. David declares, “Great is the Lord” who delights in the welfare of his servant!” and he promises to praise Him all the day long.

Psalm 36, How Precious Is Your Steadfast Love
1. David asserts that wicked transgressors have no fear of God, they cease to act wisely and do good.

2. But, the righteous man and beast, you save, “O Lord . . . how precious is your steadfast love O God.”

3. David announces, “For with you is the fountain of life; in your light do we see light.”

Psalm 37, He Will Not Forsake His Saints
1. David says to, “Fret not . . . be not envious of wrongdoers! For they will soon fade like the grass and wither like the green herb!”

2. He exclaims, “Trust in the Lord and do good, . . . Delight yourself in the Lord, . . . Commit your way to the Lord, . . . and Be still before the Lord and wait patiently for him.”

3. Three verses pertain to the reward for the meek: “verse 9 . . . those who wait for the Lord shall inherit the land, verse 11 . . . the meek shall inherit the land and delight themselves in abundant peace, and verse 29 . . . the righteous shall inherit the land and dwell upon it forever.”

4. David asserts, “The Lord laughs at the wicked, for he sees that his day is coming.”

5. David meditates in his heart that, “The Lord loves justice; he will not forsake his saints. . . . The law of his God is in his heart; his steps do not slip.”

6. David says, “The salvation of the righteous is from the Lord (Saved by grace through faith per Ephesians 2:8); he is their stronghold in the time of trouble (Psalm 46 pertains).”

Psalm 38, Do Not Forsake Me, O Lord
1. David places all his longings before the Lord as he is ready to fall when his pain is ever before him, yet he says, “I confess my iniquity; I am sorry for my sin.”

2. David pleads for the Lord to not forsake him and make haste to help him; he reaffirms that the Lord is his salvation!

Psalm 39, What Is the Measure of My Days?
1. David seeks to know the number of his days and to know his end while knowing that man is a mere breath.

2. He says, “Man heaps up wealth and knows not who will gather it.”

3. David pleads for the Lord to, “Deliver him from all his transgressions.”

4. David adds, “For I am a sojourner with you, a guest, like all my fathers.”

Psalm 40, My Help and My Deliverer
1. David explains that the Lord, “heard his cry for help and drew him up from the pit of destruction, out of the miry bog, and set his feet upon a rock, making his steps secure. He put a new song in his mouth, a song of praise to our God.”

2. He distinguishes how blessed is the man who makes the Lord his trust and does not turn to the proud.

3. He says sacrifices and offering are not the delight of the Lord, but it is based on doing the will of God; his law is written in his heart.

4. David says it is written in the scroll of the book of him, “I have told the glad news of deliverance in the great congregation; behold, I have restrained my lips, as you know, O Lord. I have not hidden your deliverance within my heart; I have spoken of your faithfulness and your salvation; I have not concealed your steadfast love and your faithfulness from the great congregation.”

Psalm 41, O Lord, Be Gracious to Me
1. David proclaims that the one who considers the poor is blessed and in his day of trouble the Lord will deliver him.

2. It appears that David does put some reliance on his integrity (like Job), yet in his illness he confesses, “O Lord be gracious to me; heal me, for I have sinned against you!”

3. David also uses the term “repay” in the context of his enemies while seeking healing and being in his presence forever.

Psalm 42, Why Are You Cast Down, O My Soul? [BOOK TWO OF PSALMS ON SONGS OF PRAISE BEGINS]
1. David assigned the Kohathites for the service of songs used in the tabernacle to praise the living God.

2. David shows how, “As a  deer pants for flowing streams . . .” is compared to how his soul thirsts for the living God.

3. In this Psalm/song, David reveals how he, “desires to know when he will appear before the living God.”

4. He shows how hope is expressed and praise is promised to God, his salvation.

Psalm 43, Send Out Your Light and Your Truth
1. This song is also for service in the tabernacle to praise the living God and David pleads to be vindicated and receive defense of his cause against an ungodly people, from the deceitful and unjust man.

2. He is specifically seeking God’s light and truth to, “lead him to his holy hill and to his dwelling!”

3. He promises to go to the altar of God with exceeding joy and praise him with the lyre.

Psalm 44, Come to Our Help
1. This song is also for service in the tabernacle to praise the living God and David pleads for help like the deeds God performed in the days of old, driving out nations with his own hand and his arm, not that of the people; God’s right arm and the light of his face saved them.

2. He promises to give thanks to his name forever.

3. But, help is needed because, “. . . we have been made like sheep for slaughter and scattered among the nations.”

4. And, “. . . we are scorned by those around us, a laughingstock among the peoples even though we have not forgotten you, and we have not been false to your covenant, you know the secrets of the heart.”

5. So, he exclaims, “Awake! Why are you sleeping, O Lord? Rouse yourself! Do not reject us forever!”

6. And, he requested, “Redeem us for the sake of your steadfast love!”

Psalm 45, Your Throne, O God, Is Forever
1. Here is a love song addressing verses to the king revealing his splendor and majesty.

2. It toasts to victory in the cause of truth, meekness, and righteousness, to recognize the throne of God forever and ever, with a scepter of uprightness.

3. It promises to cause the Lord’s name to be remembered in all generations; so that nations will praise him forever and ever.

Psalm 46, God Is Our Fortress
1. Psalm 37 pertains.

2. This song confides in the refuge and strength of the Lord, a present help in trouble.

3. Therefore fear is dismissed even during earthquakes and floods, when concentrating only on the holy habitation of the Most High God.

4. Knowing this, “When nations rage and kingdoms totter, the earth melts at the utterance of his voice,” confirming that “The Lord of hosts is with us; the God of Jacob is our fortress.”

Psalm 47, God Is King over All the Earth
1. This song instructs that, “We are to clap our hands and shout to God with loud songs of joy!”

2. It also informs that, “The Lord, the Most High, is to be feared, a great king over all the earth.”

3. And it conveys that, “. . . the shields of the earth belong to God; he is highly exalted!”

Psalm 48, Zion, the City of Our God
1. Mount Zion is the focus of this song, indicating that, “Great is the Lord and greatly to be praised.”

2. It says, “His holy mountain is high in elevation and is the joy of all the earth; it is the city of the great King.”

3. And, “. . . tell the next generation that this is God, our God forever and ever.”

4. Beyond death, “He will guide us forever.”

Psalm 49, Why Should I Fear in Times of Trouble?
1. This song is dedicated to wisdom; the meditation of his heart is understanding

2. It is a proverb for the rich and poor alike that is solved by riddle to the music of the lyre.

3. An explanation is given how, “no man can ransom another, or give to God the price of his life, for the ransom of their life is costly and can never suffice, that he should live on forever and never see the pit.”

4. For, “he sees that even the wise die; the fool and the stupid alike must perish and leave their wealth to others.”

5. As for pomp, “Man will not remain; he is like the beasts that perish. This is the path of those who have foolish confidence; yet after them people approve of their boasts.”

6. We are told, “Be not afraid when a man becomes rich, when the glory of his house increases. For when he dies he will carry nothing away; his glory will not go down after him. . . . Man in his pomp yet without understanding is like the beasts that perish.”

Week #76; Wed, Jun 12: Psalm 50-68

Week #76; Wed, Jun 12: Psalm 50:1-68:35 (see www.jwaministries.net/wp for all previous weekly posts)

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Section 2 of 5 in Psalms continues in this week’s post and remains focused on songs for the tabernacle (search on “Psalms” in Wikipedia, GotQuestions.org, or elsewhere for more information).

2. It is easy to see how the enemies of David (Saul and Absalom, et al) are lurking around trying to destroy him which makes David focus on their evil intentions; he routinely turns to God lamenting in Psalms (see cites from a concordance that point back to the events that pertain).

3. The larger conflict between the Holy Trinity and the Satanic Trinity extends to today making Psalms, and the other books of wisdom just as pertinent today as then–it will take Armageddon to end it.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Psalm 50, God Himself is Judge
1. David assigned Asaph for service in the tabernacle singing (1 Chr. 6:39).

2. He proclaims God the Lord is the Mighty One who comes with devouring fire before him, a mighty tempest that he may judge his people; the heavens declare his righteousness.

3. Since every beast of the field is his; the world and its fulness is his and he does not want sacrifices that are always before him.

4. He rebukes the wicked; but, to the one who offers thanksgiving as his sacrifice glorifies him and orders his way rightly, he will show the “salvation of God!”

Psalm 51, Create in Me a Clean Heart, O God
1. David cries out to God for mercy following the confrontation by Nathan about Bathsheba.

2. He laments to be washed thoroughly from his iniquity, and cleansed from his sin.

3. David asks the Lord to blot out all his iniquities, create in him a clean heart, and renew a right spirit within him; to take not the Holy Spirit from him.

4. David states that, “The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit; a broken and contrite heart, O God, you will not despise.”

5. David brings up Zion; he asks God to build up the walls of Jerusalem, followed by right sacrifices.

Psalm 52, The Steadfast Love of God Endures
1. David compares Saul’s persona toward the Lord as doing evil and trusting in the abundance of his riches; but, David says, “I am like a green olive tree in the house of God, I will thank you forever.”

2. He promises to wait for his name, for it is good, in the presence of the godly.

3.  The steadfast love of God endures all the day.

Psalm 53, There Is None Who Does Good
1. David writes, “The fool says in his heart, “There is no God.”

2. He says, “God looks down from heaven on the children of man to see if there are any who understand, who seek after God; but, they have all fallen away. Together they have become corrupt; there is none who does good, not even one.”

3. David laments, “Oh, that salvation for Israel would come out of Zion! When God restores the fortunes of his people, let Jacob rejoice, let Israel be glad.”

Psalm 54, The Lord Upholds My Life
1. David laments for God to “save him by his name and vindicate him by his might; to hear his prayer.”

2. He knew that strangers (Ziphites) have risen against him; ruthless men seeking his life; they do not set God before themselves.

3. Yet, he faithfully and confidently states that, “God has delivered him from every trouble and he has looked in triumph on his enemies.”

Psalm 55, Cast Your Burden on the Lord
1. David’s heart is anguishing because of the “noise of the enemy and the oppression of the wicked” causing him to “fear and tremble.”

2. He says, “Oh, that I had wings like a dove! I would fly away and be at rest; yes, I would wander far away; I would lodge in the wilderness; I would hurry to find a shelter from the raging wind and tempest.”

3. Absalom, his son, appears to be the focus of David’s concerns (2 Sam. 15:12).

Psalm 56, In God I Trust
1. When David was seized in Gath by the Philistines, his oppression (1 Sam. 21:10), weighed heavily on him.

2. He exclaims to God, “You have kept count of my tossing; put my tears in your bottle. Are they not in your book?”

3. David says, “in God I trust. I shall not be afraid. What can man do to me?”

4. David adds, “I must perform my vows to you, O God; I will render thank offerings to you. For you have delivered my soul from death, yes, my feet from falling, that I may walk before God in the light of life.”

Psalm 57, Let Your Glory Be over All the Earth
1. When David fled from Saul to the cave of Adullam, he asked God to be merciful to him, “for in you my soul takes refuge; in the shadow of your wings I will take refuge, till the storms of destruction pass by.”

2. He proclaims that he will “give thanks to you, O Lord, among the peoples; I will sing praises to you among the nations. . . Let your glory be over all the earth!”

Psalm 58, God Who Judges the Earth
1. David asserts, “The righteous will rejoice when he sees the vengeance; he will bathe his feet in the blood of the wicked.”

2. He states, “Mankind will say, ‘Surely there is a reward for the righteous; surely there is a God who judges on earth.'”

Psalm 59, Deliver Me from My Enemies
1. When Saul sent men to watch David’s house in order to kill him, David appealed to God saying, “Deliver me from my enemies, O my God; protect me from those who rise up against me; deliver me from those who work evil and save me from bloodthirsty men.”

2. He says, “But you, O Lord, laugh at them; you hold all the nations in derision. O my Strength, I will watch for you, for you, O God, are my fortress. My God in his steadfast love will meet me; God will let me look in triumph on my enemies.”

3. David concludes, “. . . they (enemies) are trapped in their pride. O my Strength, I will sing praises to you, for you, O God, are my fortress, the God who shows me steadfast love.”

Psalm 60, He Will Tread Down Our Foes
1. David laments to God for restoration and to go forth with his armies.

2. He knew that with God, he would do valiantly and tread down his foes that he listed (Moab, Edom, Philistia, et al).

Psalm 61, Lead Me to the Rock
1. David says, “Hear my cry, O God, listen to my prayer; from the end of the earth I call to you when my heart is faint.”

2. He desires, to be “lead to the rock that is higher than him, for you, O God, have heard my vows; you have given me the heritage of those who fear your name.”

Psalm 62, My Soul Waits for God Alone
1. David says, “For God alone my soul waits in silence; from him comes my salvation.”

2. He tells his people, “Trust in him at all times, O people; pour out your heart before him; God is a refuge for us.

3. He warns, “Those of low estate are but a breath; those of high estate are a delusion; in the balances they go up; they are together lighter than a breath. Put no trust in extortion; set no vain hopes on robbery; if riches increase, set not your heart on them. . . For you will render to a man according to his work.”

Psalm 63, My Soul Thirsts for You
1. When in the wilderness of Judah, David prays, “O God, you are my God; earnestly I seek you; my soul thirsts for you; my flesh faints for you . . .”

2. He says, “My soul clings to you; your right hand upholds me. But those who seek to destroy my life shall go down into the depths of the earth; they shall be given over to the power of the sword; they shall be a portion for jackals.”

Psalm 64, Hide Me from the Wicked
1. David prays, “Hear my voice, O God, in my complaint; preserve my life from dread of the enemy. Hide me from the secret plots of the wicked, from the throng of evildoers . . . ”

2. He concludes, “Let all the upright in heart exult!”

Psalm 65, O God of Our Salvation
1. David exclaims, “Praise is due to you, O God, in Zion, and to you shall vows be performed. . . Blessed is the one you choose and bring near, to dwell in your courts!”

2. He concludes, “The pastures of the wilderness overflow, the hills gird themselves with joy, the meadows clothe themselves with flocks, the valleys deck themselves with grain, they shout and sing together for joy.”

Psalm 66, How Awesome Are Your Deeds
1. Being keenly aware of the miracles of God, David alludes to past miracles to describe the awesomeness of God (Ex. 14:21). See related link at Week #11 on the crossing of the Red Sea; http://www.biblebelievers.org.au/bb971126.htm. Note that Solomon, David’s son, erected columns to mark the scene of the crossing as documented in a related video at Week #12 at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8y-uiccIiSY&index=2&t=0s&list=PL6NNBo_y_fjMk_bo9u17_2D5BNehXl6m6

2. It is easy for David to communicate the awesomeness of God with the closeness of time to God’s miraculous events; he says, “Come and see what God has done: he is awesome in his deeds toward the children of man. He turned the sea into dry land; they passed through the river on foot. There did we rejoice in him, who rules by his might forever, whose eyes keep watch on the nations–let not the rebellious exalt themselves.”

Psalm 67, Make Your Face Shine upon Us
1. David witnesses, “May God be gracious to us and bless us and make his face to shine upon us, that your way may be known on earth, your saving power among all nations.”

2. He announces, “God shall bless us; let all the ends of the earth fear him!”

Psalm 68, God Shall Scatter His Enemies
1. David concludes, “God shall arise, his enemies shall be scattered; and those who hate him shall flee before him.!”

2. David is conscious of “the mount that God desired for his abode, yes, where the Lord will dwell forever . . . ”

3. He affirms, “God will strike the heads of his enemies, the hairy crown of him who walks in his guilty ways.

Week #77; Wed, Jun 19: Psalm 69-80

Week #77; Wed, Jun 19: Psalm 69:1-80:19

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. This week’s posting enters into Book 3 of 5 in Psalms and concludes the prayers of David in Psalm 72.

2. Beginning with Psalm 73, the plan of God and one’s soul highlights corruption and how the righteous deal with it.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Psalm 69, Save Me, O God
1. David uses water to express how it is threatening his life; it represents all those who would destroy him.

2. Even so, his prayer is to the Lord for saving faithfulness and deliverance from his enemies (the mire).

3. He is in distress and seeks the Lord to draw near to his soul, redeem him, and ransom him because of his enemies.

4. David says of his enemies, “Let them be blotted out of the book of the living; let them not be enrolled among the righteous.”

5. Conversely, Revelation 3:5 uses “book of life” to reflect the righteous therein, those that conquer, and are dressed in white that are worthy to walk with the Lord.

5. David promises to praise the name of God with a song; to magnify him with thanksgiving.

6. Zion will be saved by God; the cities of Judah will be built up for dwelling by those who love his name.

Psalm 70, O Lord, Do Not Delay
1. David is deeply perplexed over his enemies that are trying to destroy him; he asks the Lord to turn them back and bring them to dishonor.

2. But for all that seek the Lord and love His salvation, David rejoices with “God is great!”

3. He seeks prompt help and delivery without delay.

Psalm 71, Forsake Me Not When My Strength is Spent
1. Taking refuge in the Lord is the rock and fortress of righteousness especially when strength is depleted in the time of old age.

2. The Lord is hope and trust and to be continually praised.

3. When enemies consult together and say, “God has forsaken him; pursue and seize him, for there is none to deliver him.” then, “I will hope continually and praise you yet more and more.”

4. “I will proclaim your wondrous deeds.”

5. “I will also praise you with the harp for your faithfulness, O my God; I will sing praises to you with the lyre, O Holy One of Israel. My lips will shout for joy, when I sing praises to you; my soul also, which you have redeemed.”

Psalm 72, Give the King Your Justice
1. It appears David prays for his son, King Solomon, saying, “Give the king your justice, O God, and your righteousness to the royal son!

2. He asks that he may, “judge your people with righteousness, and your poor with justice.”

3. He asks for blessings, peace, and prosperity from the mountains with rain to water them.

4. He asks for defense for the cause of the poor and deliverance to the children of the needy.

5. He asks for the Lord to “crush the oppressor!

6. “The prayers of David, the son of Jesse, are ended (v.20).”

Psalm 73, God Is My Strength and Portion Forever
1. Asaph continues (in book 3 of 5) to focus on how God is active in history, the need for human response to God through praise and prayer, and the need to trust and fear the Lord.

2. Asaph asserts, “While God is good to Israel and to those pure in heart, envy and arrogance appears when the prosperity of the wicked is observed.”

3. He summarizes the wicked like this, “The wicked have no pangs until death, they are fat and sleek, they are not in trouble as others, they are not stricken like the rest of mankind, their heart overflows with follies, they set their mouths against the heavens, and their tongues struts through the earth.”

4. So he reasons, “People turn back to them and find no fault in them saying, ‘How can God know?'”

5. Returning to the sanctuary, he discovers relief, “But when I thought how to understand this, it seemed to me a wearisome task, until I went into the sanctuary of God; then I discerned their end.”

6. He recounts, “They are destroyed in a moment, swept away utterly by terrors!”

7. He announces, “Nevertheless, I am continually with you; you hold my right hand. You guide me with our counsel, and afterward you will receive me to glory. Whom have I in heaven but you?”

8. He concludes, “I have made the Lord God my refuge, that I may tell of all your works.”

Psalm 74, Arise, O God, Defend Your Cause
1. Asaph continues by asking the Lord to, “Remember your congregation, which you have purchased of old, which you have redeemed to be the tribe of your heritage! Remember Mount Zion, where you have dwelt.”

2. He (Asaph, possibly a temple singer known to be from the Asaphites in the linage of Levi) speaks for a group or congregation that is redeemed as the tribe of the Lords heritage.

3. He laments over the enemy destroying everything in the sanctuary (probably first temple) and placing their own signs for signs.

4. He questions why God holds back his hand from destroying them.

5. He praises the Lord for dividing the sea, splitting open springs and brooks, drying up ever-flowing streams, establishing the day and the night, summer and winter, sun and heavenly lights, and fixing the boundaries of the earth.

6. He says, “Do not deliver the soul of your dove to the wild beasts; do not forget the life of your poor forever.”

7. He exclaims, “Arise, O God, defend your cause; remember how the foolish scoff at you all the day!”

Psalm 75, God Will Judge with Equity
1. Asaph recounts the wondrous deeds of the Lord and praises his name.

2. He warns the boastful not to boast and the wicked not to blow their horn or speak with a haughty neck.

3. And, “All the horns of the wicked will be cut off, but the horns of the righteous shall be lifted up.”

Psalm 76, Who Can Stand Before You?
1. Asaph also exclaims, “In Judah God is known; his name is great in Israel. His abode has been established in Salem, his dwelling place in Zion.”

2. As for the stouthearted, “they were stripped of their spoil; they sank into sleep, all the men of war were unable to use their hands.”

3. He states about the Lord, “Who can stand before you when once your anger is roused?”

Psalm 77, In the Day of Trouble I Seek the Lord
1. Asaph asks, “Has God forgotten to be gracious? Has he in anger shut up his compassion?”

2. Still, he confidently appeals, “Your way, O God, is holy. What god is great like our God? You are the God who works wonders; you have made known your might among the peoples. You with your arm redeemed your people, the children of Jacob and Joseph.”

3. He reaffirms, “Your way was through the sea, your path through the great waters; yet your footprints were unseen. You led your people like a flock by the hand of Moses and Aron.”

Psalm 78, Tell the Coming Generation
1. Asaph insists that the coming generation(s) be told of the wondrous works of the Lord, and the wonders that he has done.

2. He says, “He established a testimony in Jacob and appointed a law in Israel, which he commanded our fathers to teach to their children that the next generation might know them, the children yet unborn, and arise and tell them to the children, so that they should set their hope in God and not forget the works of God, but keep his commandments; and that they should not be like their fathers, a stubborn and rebellious generation, a generation whose heart was not steadfast, whose spirit was not faithful to God.”

3. Asaph records the works in the wilderness saying, “Yet they tested and rebelled against the Most High God and did not keep his testimonies, but turned away and acted treacherously like their fathers.” See related link at Week #11 on the crossing of the Red Sea; http://www.biblebelievers.org.au/bb971126.htm. Note that Solomon, David’s son, erected columns to mark the scene of the crossing as documented in a related video at Week #12 at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8y-uiccIiSY&index=2&t=0s&list=PL6NNBo_y_fjMk_bo9u17_2D5BNehXl6m6

Psalm 79, How Long, O Lord?
1. Asaph describes the fall of Jerusalem and asks God, “How long, O Lord?”

2. He pleads with God saying, “Pour out your anger on the nations that do not know you, and on the kingdoms that do not call upon your name! For they have devoured Jacob and laid waste his habitation.”

3. While at the same time, he pleads with God saying, “Do not remember against us our former iniquities; let your compassion come speedily to meet us, for we are brought very low. Help us, O God of our salvation, for the glory of your name; deliver us, and atone for our sins, for your name’s sake!”

4. Accordingly, Asaph conveys to the Lord, “But we your people, the sheep of your pasture, will give thanks to you forever; from generation to generation we will recount your praise.”

Psalm 80, Restore Us, O God
1. Asaph continues to plead for the Lord to “. . . come to save us. Restore us, O God; let your face shine, that we may be saved!”

2. Conditionally (it sounds like), he says, “Then we shall not turn back from you; give us life, and we will call upon your name!

Week #78; Wed, Jun 26: Psalm 81-100

Week #78; Wed, Jun 26: Psalm 81:1-100:5

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

1. This weeks posting contains the work of Asaph and the Korahites.

2. Asaph, the Korahites, and the Ezrahites were appointed to temple singing and music and possibly wrote psalms or transcribed them for others like David or Solomon.

3. As you read Psalm 91, think “Twin Towers on 9-11-2001” a for an expanded personal perspective.

4. Zion is credited as the city of God, the holy mount in Jerusalem; the Most High will establish her.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Psalm 81, Oh, That My People Would Listen to Me
1. Asaph beckons people to sing aloud to God, shout for joy to God, raise a song; sound the tambourine, the sweet lyre with the harp and blow the trumpet at the new moon, at the full moon, on our feast day.

2. God’s admonishment is threatened against strange gods among the people or if they bow down to a foreign god; God says, “I am the Lord your God, who brought you up out of the land of Egypt.”

3. God says, “. . . my people did not listen to my voice; Israel would not submit to me. So I gave them over to their stubborn hearts, to follow their own counsels.”

4. God was prepared to subdue their enemies and turn his hand against their foes and feed them with the finest of the wheat, and with honey.

Psalm 82, Rescue the Weak and Needy
1. Asaph suggests that God is judging unjustly and shows partiality to the wicked.

2. He pleads for God to give justice to the weak and the fatherless; to maintain the right of the afflicted and destitute, and rescue the weak and needy; to deliver them from the hand of the wicked.

3. He urges God to arise and judge the earth so as to inherit the nations.

Psalm 83, O God, Do Not Keep Silence
1. Asaph asks God to not keep silent as his enemies make an uproar; those that hate you and lay crafty plans against your people and consult together.

2. The enemy say, “Come, let us wipe them out as a nation; let the name of Israel be remembered no more!”

3. The conspirators are Edom, the Ishmaelites, Moab, the Hagarites, Gebal, Ammon, Amalek, Philistia, Tyre and Asshur; they are the strong arm children of Lot.

4. He urges God to put them to shame that they may seek your name, O Lord that they may know that you alone, whose name is the Lord, are the Most High over all the earth.

Psalm 84, My Soul Longs for the Courts of the Lord
1. The Sons of Korah record longings for the Lord and his dwelling in song.

2. The writer illustrates that even the sparrow finds a home, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may lay her young, at your altars, O Lord of hosts.

3. He prays, “Blessed are those who dwell in your house, ever singing your praise!”

4. He concludes saying, “For a day in your courts is better than a thousand elsewhere. I would rather be a doorkeeper in the house of my God than dwell in the tents of wickedness.”

Psalm 85, Revive Us Again
1. The Korahites seek revival and restoration to God for salvation; they ask for his love.

2. They say, “Surely his salvation is near to those who fear him, that glory may dwell in our land.”

Psalm 86, Great Is Your Steadfast Love
1. The Lord is asked to listen “incline your ear” and answer the poor and needy.

2. The plea comes from a godly servant that trusts in the Lord who lifts up his soul for grace.

3. Recognition that all nations the Lord has made shall come and worship before you and shall glorify your name.

4. The plea also includes requests for the Lord to teach his way to enable walking in truth; to avoid ruthless men seeking his life.

5. Thanks to the Lord is given for his steadfast love and for delivery of souls from the depths of Sheol.

6. Praise and glory is promised for the Lord’s slowness to anger and steadfast love and faithfulness.

Psalm 87, Glorious Things of You Are Spoken
1. The Korahites sing of Zion, the holy mount and the city of God.

2. The Most High himself will establish her; the Lord himself records as he registers the peoples.

Psalm 88, I Cry Out Day and Night Before You
1. This song of Korah and Heman (an Ezrahite) pleads for the Lord to hear their prayer; “incline your ear to my cry!”

2. As a confession, this song recognizes that their soul is in trouble and is drawing near to Sheol.

3. They are like those who remember the Lord no more and are cut off from his hand.

4. Concerns about beyond the grave are expressed in questions like, “Do you work wonders for the dead? Do the departed rise up to praise you? Is your steadfast love declared in the grave. or your faithfulness in Abandon?”

5. It appears to me that all pleas to the Lord need to be done as an “air-breathing, heart-beating soul” before we go. Today the phrase in the hymn “Amazing Grace” about “the hour I first believed” pertains.

Psalm 89, I Will Sing of the Steadfast Love of the Lord
1. Ethan, the Ezrahite, sings of the steadfast love of the Lord forever to make known his steadfast love to all generations.

2. The word “covenant” in verses 3, 28, 34, and 39 tie to 1 Kings 8:16 that holds the Lord to his word regarding David being his servant for all generations.

3. Ethan is falling back to the promise the Lord made with David as a bridge to his current situation and all offspring forever, a throne for all generations.

4. Ethan confidently uses the heavens as evidence of the wonders of the Lord and of his faithfulness in the assembly of the holy ones! (the terms chosen, elect, and predestined pertain)

5. Ethan refers to the awesomeness of the Lord with his control of the raging waves, marking north and south, and his mighty arm and strong right hand.

6. He says, “Righteousness and justice are the foundation of your throne; steadfast love and faithfulness go before you.”

7. David is highlighted as the Lord’s chosen servant, anointed with holy oil to be established forever and to be strengthened by his arm.

8. But, Ethan resigns that the pain the children of Israel are experiencing is because the Lord has exalted the right hand of his foes and have made all his enemies rejoice.

9. Ethan says, “Lord, where is your steadfast love of old which by your faithfulness you swore to David?”

Psalm 90, From Everlasting to Everlasting (Beginning of Book 4 of 5 of Psalms)
1. Moses’ words reaffirm that the Lord, has been our dwelling place in all generations before the mountains were brought forth, or ever you had formed the earth and the world, from everlasting to everlasting you are God.

2. Even when we are brought to an end by the Lord’s anger and by his wrath we are dismayed; the Lord has set our iniquities before him and our secret sins are brought in the light of his presence.

3. Moses contends, “The years of our life are seventy, or even by reason of strength eighty; yet their span is but toil and trouble; they are soon gone, and we fly away. Who considers the power of your anger, and your wrath according to the fear of you?”

4. Moses concludes, “So teach us to number our days that we may get a heart of wisdom.”

5. He adds, “Make us glad for as many days as you have afflicted us and for as man years as we have seen evil.”

Psalm 91, My Refuge and My Fortress (9-11 pertains)
1. Reading this Psalm with consciousness of the 9-11-2001 Twin Towers tragedy is helpful in empathizing with those of his day when they were told not to fear the terror of the night and the arrows that fly by day, nor the pestilence that stalks in darkness, nor the destruction that wastes at noonday.”

2. Moses recounts to the Lord that he is, “My refuge and my fortress, my God, in whom I trust.”

3. Moses perceives that the Lord will hold fast to him in love, and he will deliver him; he will protect him, because he knows his name.

4. The Lord will satisfy Moses with long life, and satisfy him, and show him his salvation.

Psalm 92, How Great Are Your Works
1. A song for the Sabbath to sing praises to the Lord Most High and declare the steadfast love of the Lord in the morning and the faithfulness of the Lord by night with the lute, harp, and lyre.

2. In this song, “The greatness of the works of the Lord are praised; the thoughts of the Lord are very deep!”

3. Like this, “The stupid man cannot know; the fool cannot understand this: that though the wicked sprout like grass and all evildoers flourish, they are domed to destruction forever; but you, O Lord, are on high forever.”

4. But, “The righteous flourish like the palm tree and grow like a cedar in Lebanon. They are planted in the house of the Lord; they flourish in the courts of our God.”

5. In summary to the Lord, “There is no unrighteousness in him.”

Psalm 93, The Lord Reigns
1. The song says, “The Lord is “Mightier than the thunders of many waters, mightier than the waves of the sea, the Lord on high is mighty!”

2. And, “His decrees are very trustworthy; holiness befits your house, O Lord, forevermore.”

Psalm 94, The Lord Will Not Forsake His People
1. This song says, “O Lord, God of vengeance, shine forth! Rise up, O judge of the earth; repay to the proud what they deserve!”

2. It says, “The Lord knows the thoughts of man, that they are but a breath.”

3. It confirms, “Justice will return to the righteous, and all the upright in heart will follow it.”

4. It concludes, “The Lord has become my stronghold, and my God the rock of my refuge. He will bring back on them their iniquity and wipe them out for their wickedness; the Lord of our God will wipe them out.”

Psalm 95, Let Us Sing Songs of Praise
1. A song of praise to the Lord with joy and thanksgiving for the Lord is a great God, knowing the depths of the earth; the heights of the mountains, the sea is his, and his hand formed the dry land.

2. And, “. . . we are the people of his pasture, and the sheep of his hand.”

3. Even though, “. . . in the wilderness, after seeing my work, those at Massah tested the Lord for proof.”

4. It concludes with the Lord saying, “For forty years I loathed that generation and said, “They are a people who go astray in their heart, and they have not known my ways.” and “They shall not enter my rest.”

Psalm 96, Worship in the Splendor of Holiness
1. A song to declare the glory of the Lord among the nations and his marvelous works among all the peoples!

2. The Lord is to be feared above all gods; for all the gods of the peoples are worthless idols, but the Lord made the heavens.”

3. His people should, “Ascribe to the Lord the glory due his name; bring an offering, and come into his courts! Worship the Lord in the splendor of holiness; tremble before him, all the earth!”

4. It concludes saying, “The Lord will judge the peoples with equity.”

Psalm 97, The Lord Reigns
1. This song addresses, clouds, fire and lightnings of the Lord encouraging the peoples to rejoice and be glad while seeing and trembling.

2. Focus is on the need for the people saying, “O you who love the Lord, hate evil! He preserves the lives of his saints; he delivers them from the hand of the wicked.

3. So, “Rejoice in the Lord, O you righteous, and give thanks to his holy name.”

Psalm 98, Make a Joyful Noise to the Lord
1. This song is a new song of the marvelous things of the Lord.

2. A joyful noise should be made to the Lord because, “His right hand and his holy arm have worked salvation for him.”

3. And, “The Lord has made known his salvation; he has revealed his righteousness in the sight of the nations.”

4. Finally, “Let the sea roar, and all that fills it; the world and those who dwell in it! Let the rivers clap their hands; let the hills sing for joy together before the Lord, for he comes to judge the earth. He will judge the world with righteousness, and the peoples with equity.”

Psalm 99, The Lord Our God Is Holy
1. Tremble is a key word in this song.

2. The reign of the Lord exalts him in Zion and over all the peoples.

3. Praise is due his great and awesome name; Holy is he.

4. The King loves justice; worship at his footstool.

5. Moses and Aaron were among his priests, Samuel called on his name and the Lord answered them.

6. In the pillar of the cloud he spoke to them; they kept his testimonies and the statute that he gave them.

7. Therefore, this song is to, “Exalt the Lord our God, and worship at his holy mountain; for the Lord our God is holy!”

Psalm 100, His Steadfast Love Endures Forever
1. This song is for thanks for knowing that, “the Lord, he is God! It is he who made us, and we are his; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.

2. So, “Enter his gates with thanksgiving, and his courts with praise! Give thanks to him; bless his name! For the Lord is good; his steadfast love endures forever, and his faithfulness to all generations.”

Week #79; Wed, July 3: Psalm 101-113

Week #79; Wed, Jul 3: Psalm 101:1-113:9

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Creation, bondage in Egypt, and wanderings in the desert are topics put to song in Psalm 104, 105, and 106 refreshing the peoples memory (and ours) every time they are performed or read.

2. Book 4 of Psalms ends with Psalm 106 which closes the songs focusing on God is “above” us.

3. Book 5 of Psalms begins with Psalm 107 and these songs reveal how God is “among” us.

4. Recall how the five books of Psalms address how God is: “beside us” in #1, “before us” in #2, “around us” in #3, “above us” in #4, and “among us” in #5.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Psalm 101, I Will Walk with Integrity
1. David identifies multiple ways he will honor the Lord with steadfast love, justice, music, blamelessness, integrity of heart, righteousness, no perverseness, no evil, no slander, no haughtiness, no arrogance, no deceitfulness, and no lying.

2. David said he favors faithfulness, blamelessness, and protection for the city of the Lord.

Psalm 102, Do Not Hide Your Face from Me
1. Afflicted, faint, and distressed, this prayer of lament seeks the Lord.

2. Complaints are raised over fears of bones burning in a furness, aging, sleeplessness, loneliness, taunting, hunger, tears, and withering away.

3. In turning to the Lord, this prayer begins to glorify the Lord through all generations, indicating nations will fear the name of the Lord and all the kings of the earth will fear his glory.

4. The Lord is recognized for hearing the prayers of the destitute and the groans of the prisoner.

5. So, the lament of this prayer returns to the need for relief from shortened days and in light of unending days of the Lord and years without end.

Psalm 103, Bless the Lord, O My Soul
1. David prays for his soul and all that is within him to bless the Lord.

2. The Lord’s benefits are forgiveness, healing, redemption, crowns of steadfast love and mercy, and good that will renew youth like the eagles.

3. Praise is given to the Lord for his works of righteousness and justice for the oppressed.

4. Praise is given for his ways and acts to Moses and to the people of Israel.

5. Praise is given to the Lord for his mercy and grace, slowness to anger, and abounding steadfast love.

6. Praise is made for the Lord not chiding or keeping his anger forever, not dealing with us according to our sins, nor repaying us according to our iniquities.

7. Praise for removing our transgressions from us as far as the east is from the west, so far does he remove our transgressions from us.

8. Fear of the Lord, keeping his covenant, doing his commandments, obeying the voice of his word, and doing his word are important criteria in all places of his dominion.

Psalm 104, O Lord My God, You Are Very Great
1. Praise is given to the Lord from the soul with reflections on creation throughout this song.

2. The Lord has the majesty of light for clothing, he creates and sets limits for the heavens, earth, waters, clouds, his messengers are as the winds, and his ministers are as flaming fire.

3. The Lord set the foundations of the earth that cannot be moved; he set a boundary that cannot be passed by the waters or the mountains.

4. The Lord made springs gush forth in the valleys to give drink to every beast of the field and provide food from the earth, and wine to gladden the heart of man.

5. The Lord made darkness and light; the manifold of the works of the Lord is very great.

6. The Spirit of the Lord renews the face of the ground; may the glory of the Lord endure forever and my soul bless the Lord, praise the Lord.

Psalm 105, Tell of All His Wonderful Works
1. This song calls for singing praises to the Lord to make known his deeds among the peoples with reflections on Abraham and his covenant with him!

2. This song calls for seeking the strength and the presence of the Lord continually; to remember the wondrous works that he has done, his miracles, and the judgments he uttered.

3. To remember the Lord’s everlasting covenant to Israel saying, “To you I will give the land of Canaan as your portion for an inheritance.”

4. While the peoples wandered as sojourners from nation to nation, the Lord rebuked kings on their account saying, “Touch not my anointed ones, do my prophet no harm!”

5. The Lord selected Joseph, who was sold as a slave into Egypt, and was set free by the king making him lord of his house and ruler of all his possessions.

6. Israel came to Egypt and the Lord made his people very fruitful and made them stronger than their foes.

7. But the Lord turned the hearts of the Egyptians to hate his people, to deal craftily with his servants.

8. The Lord sent Moses and Aaron to perform signs and miracles in their land (Ham); he sent darkness, blood in their waters killing fish, frogs, flies, gnats, hail, lightning, shattered trees, locusts, and struck down all the firstborn.

9. Then the Lord brought out Israel with silver and gold; he spread a cloud for a covering, and fire to give light by night.

10. He gave them quail, bread from heaven, and water from a rock for he remembered his holy promise, and Abraham, his servant.

Psalm 106, Give Thanks to the Lord, for He Is Good (End of Book 4 of Psalms–God is above us)
1. This song of praise records the Lord’s mighty deeds in the desert delivered from above.

2. It begins with a confession of sins of iniquity and wickedness, and a need for remembrance and help to be saved.

3. Even though their fathers rebelled at the Red Sea, God saved them for his name’s sake, that he might make known his mighty power.

4. He rebuked the Red Sea, and it became dry; he led them through the deep as through a desert; and he saved them from the hand of the foe when the waters covered their adversaries.

5. Although they believed his words and they sang his praise, they soon forgot his works and began to crave meat putting God to the test–God granted their request but also sent a wasting disease among them.

6. When men in the camp were jealous of Moses and Aaron, the Lord opened the earth and swallowed up Dathan and the company of Abiram; fire broke out and burned up the wicked.

7. When the people made a golden calf at Horeb and worshiped it, the Lord said he would destroy them; but Moses persuaded him to turn away his wrath from destroying them.

8. When the people murmured about the promised land, the Lord swore to them that he would make them fall in the wilderness (40 years until that generation was gone) and make their offspring fall among the nations, scattering them among the lands.

9. When the people yoked themselves to the Baal of Peor, and ate sacrifices offered to the dead; they provoked the Lord to anger with their deeds and he sent a plague among them.

10. After Phinehas intervened with the Lord on the peoples behalf, they again angered him at the waters of Mariah and it went ill with Moses on their account when he spoke rashly with his lips.

11. They did not destroy the peoples as the Lord commanded them, but they mixed with the nations and learned to do as they did by serving their idols and sacrificing their sons and daughters to the demons.

12. The people were given over into the hand of the nations where they were oppressed and brought into subjection under their power; but the Lord heard their cry and remembered his covenant and relented because of his steadfast love.

Psalm 107, Let the Redeemed of the Lord Say So (Beginning of Book 5 of Psalms–God is among us)
1. Having been redeemed from trouble, the people give thanks to the Lord for his steadfast love and for gathering them in from the lands, east to west, north to south.

2. He burst their bonds apart, shattered the doors of bronze, and cut in two the bars of iron.

3. Then, “Let them thank the Lord for his steadfast love, for his wondrous works to the children of man! And let them offer sacrifices of thanksgiving, and tell of his deeds in songs of joy!”

4. When they went down in ships, the Lord commanded and raised the stormy wind; He made the storm be still, and the waves were hushed when they cried to the Lord in their trouble; he delivered them from their distress.

5. Because of the evil of its inhabitants, He turns rivers into a desert, springs of water into thirsty ground, and fruitful land into a salty waste.

6. Because he raises up the needy out of affliction and makes their families like flocks; whoever is wise, let him attend to these things and let them consider the steadfast love of the Lord.

Psalm 108, With God We Shall Do Valiantly
1. This song of exaltation is prefaced by phrases like, “I will sing and make melody with all my being! . . . I will give thanks to you, O Lord, among the peoples; I will sing praises to you among the nations. For your steadfast love is great above the heavens; your faithfulness reaches to the clouds.”

2. In lamenting over needing help in treading down foes, the request goes up for the Lord to, “grant us help against the foe, for vain is the salvation of man!”

3. And with assurance and faith in the Lord the people sing, “With God we shall do valiantly; it is he who will tread down our foes.”

Psalm 109, Help Me, O Lord My God
1. David sings, “Be not silent, O God of my praise! For wicked and deceitful mouths are opened against me, speaking against me with lying tongues.” . . . “they reward me evil for good, and hatred for my love.”

2. David focuses on the numerous traits of the wicked and what he views as the torment (reward) they should receive from the Lord.

3. David pleads for the Lord to save him according to his steadfast love and promises he will give great thanks to the Lord and praise him in the midst of the throng.

Psalm 110, Sit at My Right Hand (110 appears to pertain to Psalm 109 above)
1. The Lord replies to David regarding his enemies, “Sit at my right hand, until I make you enemies your footstool.”

2. And, “The Lord is at your right hand; he will shatter kings on the day of his wrath. He will execute judgment among the nations, filling them with corpses; he will shatter chiefs over the wide earth.”

3. Deep meaning is contained in this song that should be approached with a willingness to strengthen personal eschatology and soteriology footings on eternity.

Psalm 111, Great Are the Lord’s Works
1. This song is for those who delight in the study of the works of the Lord; it confirms that “The works of his hands are faithful and just; all his precepts are trustworthy; they are established forever and ever, to be performed with faithfulness and uprightness.”

2. So, this song leaves no obfuscation, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom; all those who practice it have a good understanding. His praise endures forever!”

Psalm 112, The Righteous Will Never Be Moved
1. This song reiterates that, “Blessed is the man who fears the Lord, who greatly delights in his commandments!”

2. But, “The wicked man sees it and is angry; he gnashes his teeth and melts away; the desire of the wicked will perish.”

Psalm 113, Who Is Like the Lord Our God
1. Then, based on Psalm 112, “Blessed be the name of the Lord from this time forth and forevermore! From the rising of the sun to its setting, the name of the Lord is to be praised.”

 

Week #80; Wed, Jul 10: Psalm 114-129

Week #80; Wed, Jul 10: Psalm 114:1-129:8

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. This block of study infers the future with the Lord in multiple instances.

2. My ESV footnotes indicate that, “Psalm 119 is an acrostic poem of twenty-two stanzas, following the letters of the Hebrew alphabet; within a stanza, each verse begins with the same Hebrew letter.”

3. It appears that reading Psalm 120-129 in a continuous stream is beneficial for following a right relationship with the Lord.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Psalm 114, Tremble at the Presence of the Lord
1. “When Israel went out from Egypt, the house of Jacob from a people of strange language, Judah became his sanctuary, Israel his dominion.” Inference is made to the special relationship between the Hebrew people and the Lord.

2. “The sea looked and fled; Jordan turned back. The mountains skipped like rams, the hills like lambs.” Inference is made to the power the Lord used to protect his people that caused their enemies to tremble.

Psalm 115, To Your Name Give Glory
1. “For the sake of your steadfast love and your faithfulness!” Why should the nations say, Where is there God? Our God is in the heavens; he does all that he pleases.” The inference here is obvious for those that trust in the Lord instead of idols of silver or gold with hands that that do not feel; mouths that do not speak; eyes that do not see; ears that do not hear; noses that do not smell; feet that do not walk; and throats that do not make a sound.

2. “. . . all that trust in them will be like them.” Inference here is grievous for those that do not walk with the Lord.

3. “O Israel, trust in the Lord! . . . You who fear the Lord, trust in the Lord! He is their help and their shield.” Inference here is to be steadfast in the Lord.

Psalm 116, I Love the Lord
1. “I love the Lord, because he has heard my voice and my pleas for mercy. Because he inclined his ear to me, therefore I will call on him as long as I live. . . . O Lord, I pray, deliver my soul!” The inference is clear, there is a need for clear connection, great communication, and a personal relationship with the Lord.

2. “All mankind are liars.” The inference here is why would trust be placed in man instead of the Lord.

3. “What shall I render to the Lord for all his benefits to me? I will lift up the cup of salvation and call on the name of the Lord.” Inference for the cup of salvation extends for all time, then and now.

4. “Precious in the sight of the Lord is the death of his saints.” The inference here is that he wants us back.

Psalm 117, The Lord’s Faithfulness Endures Forever
1. “Praise the Lord, all nations! Extol him, all peoples!” Inference is nothing should he elevated higher than the Lord.

2. “. . . The Lord Endures forever. Praise the Lord!” Inference confirms the scope of Alpha and Omega.

Psalm 118, His Steadfast Love Endures Forever
1. “The Lord is on my side; I will not fear. What can man do to me?” Inference is made to eternal life; it is not dependent on man.

2. “It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in man, . . . or princes.” Inference is made to the shortness of life, something more durable is needed to travel through eternity.

3. “Open to me the gates of righteousness, that I may enter through them and give thanks to the Lord.” Inference is made for the right spirit leading to and into eternity.

4. “The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone.” Inference is made here to Jesus.

5. “This is the day that the Lord has made; let us rejoice and be glad in it.” Inference is made to security in the Lord, not man.

6. “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord!” Inference is made of our mission to serve the will of the Lord in all that we do.

7. “The Lord is God, and he has made his light to shine upon us.” Inference is made that God knows everything about us and where we are going.

Psalm 119, Your Word Is a Lamp to My Feet (an acrostic poem)
1. “Blessed are those whose walk is blameless, who walk in the law of the Lord! Blessed are those who keep his testimonies, who seek him with their whole heart, who also do no wrong, but walk in his ways.” Inference is on knowing and keeping all of God’s precepts in our heart to know how to walk in his ways.

2. “I am a sojourner on the earth; hide not your commandments from me!” Inference is in the knowledge that life is temporary and the Lord’s commandments need to be known and used constantly.

3. “Teach me, O Lord the way of your statutes; and I will keep it to the end. Give me understanding, that I may keep your law and observe it with my whole heart.” Inference is in the commitment needed to follow the statutes of the Lord.

4. “Incline my heart to your testimonies, and not to ‘selfish gain.'” Inference is on the heart and the need for it to be open to the Lord without deviating to the right or the left for temporal distractions.

5. “The law of your mouth is better to me than thousands of gold and silver pieces.” Inference is on the temporal nature of temporal distractions and the need to value the word of the Lord above all other things.

6. “My soul longs for your salvation; I hope in your word.” Inference is on the ultimate goal, to be with the Lord.

7. “Your word is a lamp to my feet and a light to my path.” Inference is on following the Lord and avoiding all darkness in the world; seeking only truth that endures forever.

Psalm 120, Deliver Me, O Lord
1. “Deliver me, O Lord, from lying lips, form a deceitful tongue.” Inference is on seeking truth.

2. “Too long have I had my dwelling among those who hate peace. I am for peace, but they are for war.” Inference is on peace, but the environment may be bigger than the person seeking peace.

Psalm 121, My Help Comes from the Lord
1. “My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth.” Inference is on wisdom of knowing what is “big” and what is “little” and we are all little.

2. “. . . he who keeps you will not slumber.” This is further inference that we are so weak and must sleep; whereas, the Lord never sleeps.

Psalm 122, Let Us Go to the House of the Lord
1. “Let us go to the house of the Lord.” Inference is made on giving thanks to the name of the Lord and there is no better place than the house of the Lord.

2. “I will seek your good.” Inference to go where the word of the Lord resides and be fed the statutes for goodness and righteousness is a good decision.

Psalm 123, Our Eyes Look to the Lord Our God
1. “Our soul has had more than enough of the scorn of those who are at ease, of the contempt of the proud.” Inference has insight of uselessness of contempt versus righteousness and humility.

Psalm 124, Our Help Is in the Name of the Lord
1. “Our help is in the name of the Lord.” Inference harkens back to the Red Sea crossing (vs. 2-5).

Psalm 125, The Lord Surrounds His People
1. “Do good, O Lord, to those who are good, and to those who are upright in their hearts.” Inference recognizes righteousness of the heart.

Psalm 126, Restore Our Fortunes, O Lord
1. “When the Lord restored the fortunes of Zion, we were like those who dream. Then our mouth was filled with laughter, and our tongue with shouts of joy. . . . ” Inference is on joy in placing trust and faith in the Lord.

2. “He who goes out weeping and bearing the seed for sowing, shall come home bringing his sheaves with him.” Inference is on diligence and perseverance being rewarded.

Psalm 127, Unless the Lord Builds the House
1. “Unless the Lord builds the house, those who build it labor in vain. Unless the Lord watches over the city, the watchman stays awake in vain.” Inference is that the Lord must be first.

2. “Behold, children are a heritage from the Lord, the fruit of the womb a reward. . . . Blessed is the man who fills his quiver with them!” Inference is that the legacy of the Lord must be rooted in blessings from the Lord from generation to generation.

Psalm 128, Blessed Is Everyone Who Fears the Lord
1. “Blessed is everyone who fears the Lord, who walks in his ways!” Inference on fear zeroes in on gaining wisdom.

2. “May you see your children’s children.” Inference depicts fear of the Lord and walking in his ways pays off across generations.

Psalm 129, They Have Afflicted Me from My Youth
1. “The Lord is righteous; he has cut the cords of the wicked.” Inference suggests the wicked wither before they are grown.

Week #81; Wed, Jul 17: Psalm 130–150

Week #81; Wed, Jul 17: Psalm 130:1–150:6

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Key verses generally infer a lot more than what is written elsewhere in Scripture. Inferences are noted at the related bullets below.

2. Please post comments for additional inferences that come to mind for key verses or others that pertain.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Psalm 130, My Soul Waits for the Lord
1. “Let your ears be attentive to the voice of my pleas for mercy!

  • Inference: The grace of the Lord is sufficient for forgiveness of all iniquities.

2. “I wait for the Lord, my soul waits, and in his word I hope . . .”

  • Inference: There is more to life than just earthly life and full assurance that the Lord will deliver salvation and redemption for both individuals and Israel.

Psalm 131, I Have Calmed and Quieted My Soul
1. “But I have calmed and quieted my soul, like a weaned child with its mother; like a weaned child is my soul within me.”

  • Inference: There is a calmness in knowing the Lord will deliver the soul forevermore as only he can.

Psalm 132, The Lord Has Chosen Zion
1. David said, “I will not enter my house or get into my bed, I will not give sleep to my eyes or slumber to my eyelids, until I find a place for the Lord, a dwelling place for the Mighty One of Jacob.”

  • Inference: There is high desire by David to support the establishment of a dwelling place for the Lord.

2. “The Lord swore to David a sure oath from which he will not turn back: ‘One of the sons of your body I will set on your throne.'”

  • Inference: The Lord’s oath to David is an assurance that the Lord will overcome any and all obstacles that are opposed to his will; his oath will not be dismissed.

3. “For the Lord has chosen Zion; he has desired it for his dwelling place: ‘This is my resting place forever; here I will dwell, for I have desired it.'”

  • Inference: Zion carries on beyond the current earth into eternity.

4. “There I will make a horn to sprout for David; I have prepared a lamp for my anointed.”

  • Inference: “Horn” and “lamp” point to Jesus (Luke 1:69).

Psalm 133, When Brothers Dwell in Unity
1. “Behold, how good and pleasant it is when brothers dwell in unity!”

  • Inference: “Unity” pertains to collectively enabling the will of the Lord.

2. “. . . the mountains of Zion! For there the Lord has commanded the blessing, life forevermore.”

  • Inference: “Zion” is forevermore.

Psalm 134, Come, Bless the Lord
1. “May the Lord bless you from Zion, he who made heavens and earth!”

  • Inference: “Zion” is the source of prosperity of Jerusalem.

Psalm 135, Your Name, O Lord, Endures Forever
1. “For I know that the Lord is great, and that our Lord is above all gods.”

  • Inference: “Above” is used to describe the unsurmountable. Terms like omnipotent, omnipresent, omniscient, omnidirectional, and omni-righteous come to mind.

2. “Your name, O Lord, endures forever, you renown, O Lord, throughout all ages.”

  • Inference: “Endures forever” is tied to “Whatever the Lord pleases, he does, in heaven and on earth, in the seas and all the deeps.”

3. “For the Lord will vindicate his people and have compassion on his servants.”

  • Inference: As the Lord chose Jacob and Israel for himself for his own possession, so it is that he has chosen his saints before the foundation of the earth.

4. “You who fear the Lord, bless the Lord!”

  • Inference: So it is also that we who fear the Lord, bless and praise him.

Psalm 136, His Steadfast Love Endures Forever
1. “Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good, for his steadfast love endures forever.”

  • Inference: “. . . to him who alone does great wonders . . .” attributes all things to him then and now.

2. “. . . made the heavens, spread out the earth above the waters, made the great lights, sun, moon, and stars, who struck down the firstborn of Egypt, brought Israel out from among them, divided the Red Sea, made Israel pass through the midst of it, overthrew Pharaoh, led the people through the wilderness, struck down great kings, and gave the land as a heritage to Israel his servant, . . .”

  • Inference: “It is he who remembered us in our low estate . . . Give thanks to the God of heaven, . . . ”  Therefore, whatever earthly condition we experience, he will remember us.

Psalm 137, How Shall We Sing the Lord’s Song?
1. “By the waters of Babylon, there we sat down and wept, when we remembered Zion.”

  • Inference: Even in captivity in exile in Babylon, Zion was always remembered but singing was not doable in a foreign land under the torment by their captors.

Psalm 138, Give Thanks to the Lord
1. “. . . I bow down toward your holy temple and give thanks to your name for your steadfast love and your faithfulness, for you have exalted above all things your name and your word.”

  • Inference: Remembrance in singing praise to the Lord brings increase to both soul and strength.

2. “All the kings of the earth shall give you thanks, O Lord, for they have heard the words of your mouth, and they shall sing of the ways of the Lord.”

  • Inference: The Lord is all knowing and will preserve his people, fulfilling his purpose; but will stretch out his hand against the wrath of their enemies.

Psalm 139, Search Me, O God, and Know My Heart
1. “O Lord, you have searched me and known me! You know when I sit down and when I rise up; you discern my thought from afar.”

  • Inference: David assures us that the Lord knows what we are doing all the time. He knows when we sit or lie down, words on our tongue, and there is nowhere we can hide. We cannot attain the knowledge of the Lord. Our days are numbered in the Lord’s book. David seeks to be led in the way everlasting!

Psalm 140, Deliver Me, O Lord, from Evil Men
1. “Deliver me, O Lord, from evil men; preserve me from violent men, who plan evil things in their heart and stir up wars continually.”

  • Inference: David seeks freedom from violence and wickedness. He exalts the Lord, not evildoers.

2. “Surely the righteous shall give thanks to your name; the upright shall dwell in your presence.”

  • Inference: David is confident that the Lord will maintain the cause of the afflicted and execute justice.

Psalm 141, Give Ear to My Voice
1. “Give ear to my voice when I call to you! Let my prayer be counted as incense before you, and the lifting up of my hands as the evening sacrifice!”

  • Inference: David seeks good and not evil. His prayer is continually against evil deeds.

Psalm 142, You Are My Refuge
1. “With my voice I cry out to the Lord; with my voice I plead for mercy to the Lord.”

  • Inference: The setting is while David was in the cave fleeing from Saul. He says, “You are my refuge, my portion in the land of the living.” and “Deliver me from my persecutors, for they are too strong for me!”

Psalm 143, My soul Thirsts for You
1. “I remember the days of old; I meditate on all that you have done; I ponder the work of your hands. I stretch out my hands to you; my soul thirsts for you like a parched land.”

  • Inference: David humbles himself saying “I am your servant.”

2. “Make me know the way I should go, for to you I lift up my soul.”

  • Inference: David prays for the Lord to teach him to do his will and preserve his life.

Psalm 144, My Rock and My Fortress
1. “Blessed be the Lord, my rock, who trains my hands for war, and my fingers for battle; he is my steadfast love and my fortress, my stronghold and my deliverer, my shield and he in whom I take refuge, who subdues peoples under me.”

  • Inference: David says, “Man is like a breath; his days are like a passing shadow.” and he recognizes that without the Lord, he is nothing. He calls on the Lord to perform victorious events that he might be delivered from his enemies.

Psalm 145, Great Is the Lord
1. This psalm is an acrostic poem, each verse beginning with the successive letters of the Hebrew alphabet.

2. “I will extol you, my God and King, and bless your name forever and ever.”

  • Inference: Blessing the Lord in this life extends to eternity where blessing continues to flow upward to the Lord.

3. “The Lord is gracious and merciful, slow to anger and abounding in steadfast love. The Lord is good to all, and his mercy is over all that he has made.”

  • Inference: The Lord is merciful to all, which gives hope to all if we will only seek it and claim it.

4. “All your works shall give thanks to you, O Lord, and all your saints shall bless you!”

  • Inference: The Lord’s works are his witness to his might. His mark is on every scene and event.

5. “Your kingdom is an everlasting kingdom, and your dominion endures throughout all generations.”

  • Inference: All other kingdoms will fall while the kingdom of the Lord endures forever.

Psalm 146, Put Not Your Trust in Princes
1. “Put not your trust in princes, in a son of man, in whom there is no salvation. When his breath departs, he returns to the earth; on that very day his plans perish.”

  • Inference: The being of a person is temporary, but the reign of the Lord is forever, to all generations. “Praise the Lord!”

Psalm 147, He Heals the Brokenhearted
1. “He heals the brokenhearted and binds up their wounds.”

  • Inference: The parable of the Good Samaritan pertains (Luke 10:25-37)

2. “He determines the number of the stars; he gives to all of them their names. Great is our Lord and abundant in power; his understanding is beyond measure.

  • Inference: The Lord is really, really big.

3. “. . . the Lord takes pleasure in those who fear him, in those who hope in his steadfast love.”

  • Inference: Fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom (Proverbs 9:10)

Psalm 148, Praise the Name of the Lord
1. “Let them praise the name of the Lord! For he commanded and they were created. And he established them forever and ever; he gave a decree, and it shall not pass away.”

  • Inference: The name of the Lord alone is exalted; his majesty is above earth and heaven. He has raised up a horn for his people, praise for all his saints, for the people of Israel who are near him. “Horn” is Jesus (Isaiah 60:18-20).

Psalm 149, Sing to the Lord a New Song
1. “Sing to the Lord a new song, his praise in the assembly of the Godly.”

  • Inference: Dancing, melody with tambourine, and lyre are called on for making pleasure to the Lord who adorns the humble with salvation and the two-edge sword to execute judgment on the nations and punishments on the peoples.

Psalm 150, Let Everything Praise the Lord
1. “Let everything that has breath praise the Lord!”

  • Inference: David calls for trumpets, lute, harp, tambourine, dance, strings, pipes, and cymbals to be used to praise the Lord.

Week #82; Wed, Jul 24: Proverbs 1-11

Week #82; Wed, July 24: Proverbs 1:1-11:31

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Unlimited inferences appear to subtend from the flower of wisdom and the absence of it.

2. Proverbs is loaded with pointed examples of what is wise and what is an abomination.

3. Key examples are spotlighted for illustration; many more are among the Proverbs covered here.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Proverbs 1, The Beginning of Knowledge
1. “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wisdom and instruction.”

  • Inference: Solomon prayed for wisdom; he got so much more (1 Kings 3:5-15).

2. “My son, if sinners entice you, do not consent.”

  • Inference: “. . . my son, do not walk in the way with them; hold back your foot from their paths, for their feet run to evil, and they make haste to shed blood . . . Such are the ways of everyone who is greedy for unjust gain; it takes away the life of its possessors.”

3. “Wisdom cries aloud in the street, in the markets she raises her voice; at the head of the noisy streets she cries out; at the entrance of the city gates she speaks . . . ”

  • Inference: “. . . whoever listens to me will dwell secure and will be at ease, without dread of disaster.”

Proverbs 2, The Value of Wisdom
1. “My son, if you receive my words and treasure up my commandments with you, making your ear attentive to wisdom and inclining your heart to understanding . . . then you will understand the fear of the Lord and find the knowledge of God.”

  • Inference: “So you will walk in the way of the good and keep to the paths of the righteous.”

Proverbs 3, Trust in the Lord with All Your Heart
1. “Trust in the Lord with all your heart, and do not lean on your own understanding. In all your ways acknowledge him, and he will make straight your paths.”

  • Inference: “Be not wise in your own eyes; fear the Lord, and turn away from evil.”

2. “My son, do not despise the Lord’s discipline or be weary of his reproof, for the Lord reproves him whom he loves, as a father the son in whom he delights.”

  • Inference: The absence of reproof indicates a lack of a fathers love.

3. “Blessed is the one who finds wisdom, and the one who gets understanding, for the gain from her is better than gain from silver and her profit better thank gold.

  • Inference: “She is a tree of life to those who lay hold of her; those who hold her fast are called blessed.”
  • Inference: “The wise will inherit honor, but fools get disgrace.”

Proverbs 4, A Father’s Wise Instruction
1. “Hear, O sons, a father’s instruction, and be attentive, that you may gain insight, for I give you good precepts; do not forsake my teaching.”

  • Inference: “. . . the path of the righteous is like the light of dawn, which shines brighter and brighter until full day.”
  • Inference: “Put away from you crooked speech, and put devious talk far from you.”
  • Inference: “Do not swerve to the right or to the left; turn your foot away from evil.”

Proverbs 5, Warning Against Adultry
1. “My son, be attentive to my wisdom; incline your ear to my understanding, that you may keep discretion, and your lips may guard knowledge.”

  • Inference: Otherwise, the term “worm-wood” carries the negative context of the consequences (The Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis pertains)

2. “And now, O sons, listen to me, and do not depart from the words of my mouth.”

  • Inference: “. . . a forbidden woman” should be kept at a distance; “. . . do not go near the door of her house . . . rejoice in the wife of your youth . . .”
  • Inference: “For a man’s ways are before the eyes of the Lord, and he ponders all his paths.”

Proverbs 6, Practical Warnings
1. There are six things that the Lord hates, seven that are an abomination to him: 1) haughty eyes, 2) a lying tongue, 3) hands that shed innocent blood, 4) a heart that devises wicked plans, 5) feet that make haste to run to evil, 6) a false witness who breathes out lies, and 7) one who sows discord among brothers.”

  • Inference: The tight focus on adultery concludes Proverb 6 where stress is placed on keeping “your father’s commandments, and forsake not your mother’s teaching.”

2. “For the commandment is a lamp and the teaching a light, and the reproofs of discipline are the way of life . . .”

  • Inference: “He who commits adultery lacks sense; he who does it destroys himself.”

Proverbs 7, Warnings Against the Adulteress
1. “My son, keep my words and treasure up my commandments with you; keep my commandments and live; keep my teaching as the apple of your eye; bind them on your fingers; write them on the tablet of your heart.”

  • Inference: More focus on adultery in Proverb 7 reveals it is “. . . the way to Sheol, going down to the chambers of death.”

Proverbs 8, The Blessing of Wisdom
1. When wisdom calls, it speaks “noble things, and from my lips will come what is right, for my mouth will utter truth; wickedness is an abomination to my lips.”

  • Inference: “. . . blessed are those who keep my ways . . . Blessed is the one who listens to me . . .”

Proverbs 9, The Way of Wisdom
1. “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and the knowledge of the Holy One is insight. For by me your days will be multiplied and years will be added to your life.”

  • “If you are wise, you are wise for yourself; if you scoff, you alone will bear it.”

Proverbs 10, The Proverbs of Solomon
1. “The memory of the righteous is a blessing, but the name of the wicked will rot.”

  • Inference: “The wise of heart will receive commandments, but a babbling fool will come to ruin.”
  • Inference: “Whoever walks in integrity walks securely, but he who makes his ways crooked will be found out.”

2. “The mouth of the righteous is a fountain of life, but the mouth of the wicked conceals violence.”

  • Inference: “When words are many, transgression is not lacking, but whoever restrains his lips is prudent.”
  • Inference: “The mouth of the righteous brings forth wisdom, but the perverse tongue will be cut off.”

Proverbs 11, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “A false balance is an abomination to the Lord, but a just weight is his delight.”

  • Inference: “The righteous is delivered from trouble, and the wicked walks into it instead.”

2. “Whoever captures souls is wise.”

  • Inference: However, pride, crookedness, riches, wickedness, treacherousness, wickedness, godlessness, slandering, misguidance, violence, evil, and the cursed are abominations to the Lord.

 

Week #83; Wed, July 31: Proverbs 12-21

Week #83; Wed, July 31: Proverbs 12:1-21:31

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

1. Unlimited inferences appear to grow from insights in other places in the current chapter or from other places in the Bible.

2. Proverbs is loaded with pointed examples of what is wise and what is an abomination.

3. Key examples are spotlighted for illustration; many more are among the Proverbs covered here.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Proverbs 12, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid.” (12:1)

  • Inference: “How I hated discipline, and my heart despised reproof! I did not listen to the voice of my teachers or incline my ear to my instructors. I am at the brink of utter ruin . . .” (5:12-13)
  • Inference: “There is severe discipline for him who forsakes the way; whoever hates reproof will die.” (15:10)
  • Inference: “For he sees that even the wise die; the fool and the stupid alike must perish and leave their wealth to others.” (Ps. 49:10)

2. “An excellent wife is the crown of her husband, but she who brings shame is like rottenness in his bones.” (12:4)

  • Inference: “An excellent wife who can find? She is far more precious than jewels.” (31:10)

3. “Whoever works his land will have plenty of bread, but he who follows worthless pursuits lacks sense.” (12:11)

  • Inference: “Whoever works his land will have plenty of bread, he who is crooked in his ways will suddenly fall.” (28:18)
  • Inference: “. . . the work of a man’s hand comes back to him.” (12:14)
  • Inference: “The hand of the diligent will rule, while the slothful will be put to forced labor.” (12:24)

4. “Lying lips are an abomination to the Lord, but those who act faithful are his delight.” (12:22)

  • Inference: “Outside are the dogs and sorcerers and the sexually immoral and murderers and idolaters, and everyone who loves and practices falsehood.” (Rev. 22:15)
  • Inference: “There are six things that the Lord hates, seven that are an abomination to him: haughty eyes, a lying tongue, and hands that shed innocent blood, a heart that devises wicked plans, feet that make haste to run to evil, a false witness who breathes out lies, and one who sows discord among brothers.” (6:16-17)
  • Inference: “Those of crooked heart are an abomination to the Lord, but those of blameless ways are his delight.” (11:20)

Proverbs 13, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Whoever guards his mouth preserves his life; he who opens wide his lips comes to ruin.” (13:3)

  • Inference: “One pretends to be rich, yet has nothing; another pretends to be poor, yet has great wealth.” (13:7)

2. “The light of the righteous rejoices, but the lamp of the wicked will be put out.” (13:9)

  • Inference: “. . . when his lamp shone upon my head, and by his light I walked through darkness . . . (Job 29:3)
  • Inference: “Indeed, the light of the wicked is put out, and the flame of his fire does not shine. The light is dark in his tent, and his lamp above him is put out.” (Job 18:5)

3. “Wealth gained hastily will dwindle, but whoever gathers little by little will increase it.” (13:11)

  • Inference: “Treasures gained by wickedness do not profit, but righteousness delivers from death.” (10:2)
  • Inference: “The getting of treasures by a lying tongue is a fleeting vapor and a snare of death.” (21:6)

4. “Whoever despises the word brings destruction on himself, but he who reveres the commandment will be rewarded.” (13:13)

  • Inference: “Whoever gives thought to the word will discover good, and blessed is he who trusts in the Lord.” (16:20)
  • Inference: “A wicked messenger falls into trouble, but a faithful envoy brings healing.” (13:17)

Proverbs 14, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “The wisest of women builds her house, but folly with her own hands tears it down.” (14:1)

  • Inference: “Then all the people who were at the gate and the elders said, ‘We are witnesses. May the Lord make the woman, who is coming into your house, like Rachel and Leah, who together built up the house of Israel. May you act worthily in Ephrathah and be renowned in Bethlehem, and may your house be like the house of Perez, whom Tamar bore to Judah, because of the offspring that the Lord will give you by this young woman.’” (Ruth 4:11-12)

2. “The wisdom of the prudent is to discern his way, but the folly of fools is deceiving.” (14:8)

  • Inference: “One who is wise is cautious and turns away from evil, but a fool is reckless and careless.” (13:16)

3. “The house of the wicked will be destroyed, but the tent of the upright will flourish.” (14:11)

  • Inference: “The Lord’s curse is on the house of the wicked, but he blesses the dwelling of the righteous.” (3:33)

4. “The fear of the Lord is a fountain of life, that one may turn away from the snares of death.” (14:27)

  • Inference: “The teaching of the wise is a fountain of life, that one may turn away from the snares of death.” (13:14)

5. “Whoever is slow to anger has great understanding, but he who has a hasty temper exalts folly.” (14:29)

  • Inference: “Whoever is slow to anger is better than the mighty, and he who rules his spirit than he who takes a city.” (16:32)

6. “Righteousness exalts a nation, but sin is a reproach to any people.” (14:34)

  • Inference: Still true!

Proverbs 15, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.” (15:1)

  • Inference: “With patience a ruler may be persuaded, and a soft tongue will break a bone.” (25:15)
  • Inference: “A gentle tongue is a tree of life, but perverseness in it breaks the spirit.” (15:4)

2. “The eyes of the Lord are in every place, keeping watch on the evil and the good.” (15:3)

  • Inference: “Does not he see my ways and number all my steps? (Job 31:4)

3. “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination to the Lord, but the prayer of the upright is acceptable to him.” (15:8)

  • Inference: “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination; how much more when he brings it with evil intent. (21:27)

4. “There is severe discipline for him who forsakes the way; whoever hates reproof will die.” (15:10)

  • Inference: “Why will you still be struck down? Why will you continue to rebel? The whole head is sick, and the whole heart faint. (Isa. 1:5)

5. “Better is a dinner of herbs where love is than a fattened ox and hatred with it.” (15:17)

  • Inference: “Better is a dry morsel with quiet than a house full of feasting with strife. (17:1)

6. “The way of a sluggard is like a hedge of thorns, but the path of the upright is a level highway.” (15:19)

  • Inference: “But my people have forgotten me; they make offerings to false gods; they made them stumble in their ways, in the ancient roads, and to walk into side roads, not the highway, making their land a horror, a thing to be hissed at forever. Everyone who passes by it is horrified and shakes his head.” (Jer. 18:15)

7. “The Lord is far from the wicked, but he hears the prayers of the righteous.” (15:29)

  • Inference: “The Lord is near to all who call on him, to all who call on him in truth. He fulfills the desire of those who fear him; he also hears their cry and saves them. (Ps. 145:18-19)

Proverbs 16, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “All the ways of a man are pure in his own eyes, but the Lord weights the spirit.” (16:2)

  • Inference: “Every way of a man is right in his own eyes, but the Lord weighs the heart.” (21:2)

2. “By steadfast love and faithfulness iniquity is atoned for, and by the fear of the Lord one turns away from evil.” (16:6)

  • Inference: Therefore, O king (Nebuchadnezzar), let my (Daniel) counsel be acceptable to you: break off your sins by practicing righteousness, and your iniquities by showing mercy to the oppressed, that there may perhaps be a lengthening of your prosperity.” (Dan. 4:27)

3. “The highway of the upright turns aside from evil; whoever guards his way preserves his life.” (16:17)

  • Inference: “My brothers, if anyone among you wanders from the truth and someone brings him back, let him know that whoever brings back a sinner from his wandering will save his soul from death and will cover a multitude of sins.” (Jam. 5:19-20)

4. “Whoever gives thought to the word will discover good, and blessed is he who trusts in the Lord.” (16:20)

  • Inference: “Whoever gets sense loves his own soul; he who keeps understanding will discover good.” (19:8)

5. “Gracious words are like a honeycomb, sweetness to the soul and health to the body.” (16:24)

  • Inference: “The thoughts of the wicked are an abomination to the Lord, but gracious words are pure.” (15:26)

6. “Gray hair is a crown of glory; it is gained in a righteous life.” (16:31)

  • Inference: “Grandchildren are the crown of the aged, and the glory of children is their fathers.” (17:6)

Proverbs 17, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “An evildoer listens to wicked lips, and a liar gives ear to a mischievous tongue.” (17:4)

  • Inference: “The crucible is for silver, and the furnace is for gold, and the Lord gets hearts.” (17:3)

2. “Whoever covers an offense seeks love, but he who repeats a matter separates close friends.” (17:9)

  • Inference: “Hated stirs up strife, but love covers all offenses.” (10:12)

3. “If anyone returns evil for good, evil will not depart from his house.” (17:20)

  • Inference: “Those of crooked heart are an abomination to the Lord, but those of blameless ways are his delight.” (11:20)

4. “The discerning sets his face toward wisdom, but the eyes of a fool are on the ends of the earth.” (17:24)

  • Inference: “A scoffer seeks wisdom in vain, but knowledge is easy for a man of understanding.” (14:6)

5. “Whoever restrains his words has knowledge, and he who has a cool spirit is a man of understanding.” (17:27)

  • Inference: “When words are many, transgression is not lacking, but whoever restrains his lips is prudent.” (10:19)

Proverbs 18, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “A fool takes no measure in understanding, but only in expressing his opinion.” (18:2)

  • Inference: “In everything the prudent acts with knowledge, but a fool flaunts his folly.” (13:16)

2. “When wickedness comes, contempt comes also and with dishonor comes disgrace.” (18:3)

  • Inference: “Pride goes before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall.” (16:18)

3. “The name of the Lord is a strong tower; the righteous man runs into it and is safe. (18:10)

  • Inference: “The Lord descended in the cloud and stood with him there, and proclaimed the name of the Lord. The Lord passed before him and proclaimed, ‘The Lord, the Lord, a God merciful and gracious, slow to anger, and abounding in steadfast love and faithfulness, keeping steadfast love for thousands, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin, but who will by no means clear the guilty, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children and the children’s children, to the third and the fourth generation.'” (Ex. 34:5-7)

4. “He who finds a wife finds a good thing and obtains favor from the Lord.” (18-22)

  • Inference: “An excellent wife is the crown of her husband, but she who brings shame is like rottenness in his bones.” (12:4)

Proverbs 19, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Better is a poor person who walks in his integrity than one who is crooked in speech and is a fool.” (19:1)

  • Inference: “Whoever walks in uprightness fears the Lord, but he who is devious in his ways despises him.” (14:2)

2. “When a man’s folly brings his way to ruin, his heart rages against the Lord.” (19:3)

  • Inference: “The integrity of the upright guides them, but the crookedness of the treacherous destroys them.” (11:3)

3. “A false witness will not go unpunished, and he who breathes out lies will not escape.” (19:5)

  • Inference: “Truthful lips are an abomination to the Lord, but those who act faithfully are his delight.” (12:19)

4. “It is not fitting for a fool to live in luxury, much less for a slave to rule over princes.” (19:10)

  • Inference: “Fine speech is not becoming to a fool; still less is false speech to a prince.” (17:7)

5. “Good sense makes one slow to anger, and it is his glory to overlook an offense.” (19:11)

  • Inference: “Whoever is slow to anger has great understanding, but he who has a hasty temper exalts folly.” (14:29)

6. “Whoever is generous to the poor lends to the Lord, and he will repay him for his deed.” (19:17)

  • Inference: “Whoever has a bountiful eye will be blessed, for he shares his bread with the poor.” (22:9)

7. “The fear of the Lord leads to life, and whoever has it rests satisfied; he will not be visited by harm.” (19:23)

  • Inference: “The wage of the righteous leads to life, the gain of the wicked to sin.” (10:16)

Proverbs 20, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Wine is a mocker, strong drink a brawler, and whoever is led astray by it is not wise.” (20:1)

  • Inference: “Who has woe? Who has sorrow? Who has strife? Who has complaining? Who has wounds without cause? Who has redness of eyes? Those who tarry long over wine; those who go to try mixed wine. Do not look at wine when it is red, when it sparkles in the cup and goes down smoothly. In the end it bites like a serpent and stings like an adder. (23:29-32)

2. “The sluggard does not plow in the autumn; he will seek at harvest and have nothing.” (20:4)

  • Inference: “Slothfulness casts into a deep sleep, and an idle person will suffer hunger.” (19:15)

3. “Unequal weights and unequal measures are both alike an abomination to the Lord.” (20:10)

  • Inference: “Unequal weights are an abomination to the Lord, and false scales are not good.” (20:23)

4. “There is gold and abundance of costly stones, but the lips of knowledge are a precious jewel.” (20:15)

  • Inference: “No mention shall be made of coral or of crystal; the price of wisdom is above pearls.” (Job 28:18)

5. “Do not say, ‘I will repay evil’; wait for the Lord, and he will deliver you.” (20:22)

  • Inference: “Do not say, ‘I will do to him as he has done to me; I will pay the man back for what he has done.'” (24:29)

Proverbs 21, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Every way of a man is right in his own eyes, but the Lord weighs the heart.” (21:2)

  • Inference: “All the ways of a man are pure in his own eyes, but the Lord weighs the spirit” (16:2)

2. “Haughty eyes and a proud heart, the lamp of the wicked, are sin.” (21:4)

  • Inference: “Whoever slanders his neighbor secretly I will destroy. Whoever has a haughty look and an arrogant heart I will not endure. (Ps. 101:5)

3. “When a scoffer is punished, the simple becomes wise; when a wise man is instructed, he gains knowledge.” (21:11)

  • Inference: “Strike a scoffer, and the simple will learn prudence; reprove a man of understanding, and he will gain knowledge.” (19:25)

4. “Whoever closes his ear to the cry of the poor will himself call out and not be answered.” (21:13)

  • Inference: “For judgment is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy. Mercy triumphs over judgment.” (James 2:13)

5. “The horse is made ready for the day of battle, but the victor belongs to the Lord.” (21:31)

  • Inference: “Truly the hills are a delusion, the orgies on the mountains. Truly in the Lord our God is the salvation of Israel.” (Jer. 3:23)

Week #84; Wed, Aug 07: Proverbs 22–30

Week #84; Wed, August 07: Proverbs 22:1–30:33

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Please add key verses and inferences where they were omitted; use the “comment” block in the related blog page to record those verses that illustrate what you have observed.

2. A record holding baseball hitter was once asked, “What is your secret to such great hitting?” He answered, “See the ball, hit the ball.” Proverbs can be looked at in the same way, “See the wisdom, do the wisdom.”

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Proverbs 22, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “A good name is to be chosen rather than great riches, and favor is better than silver or gold.” (22:1)

  • Inference: “A good name is better than precious ointment, and the day of death than the day of birth.” (Eccles. 7:1)

2. “Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it.” (22:6)

  • Inference: “Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord.” (Eph. 6:4)

3. “The rich rules over the poor, and the borrower is the slave of the lender.” (22:7)

  • Inference: “But you have dishonored the poor man. Are not the rich the ones who oppress you, and the ones who drag you into court?” (James 2:6)

4. “He who loves purity of heart, and whose speech is gracious, will have the king as his friend.” (22:11)

  • Inference: “Righteous lips are the delight of a king, and he loves him who speaks what is right.” (16:13)

5. “Do not move the ancient landmark that your fathers have set.” (22:28)

  • Inference: “Do not move an ancient landmark or enter the fields of the fatherless, for their Redeemer is strong; he will plead their cause against you.” (23:10-11)

Proverbs 23, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Do not toil to acquire wealth; be discerning enough to desist.” (23:28)

  • Inference: “Whoever is greedy for unjust gain troubles his own household, but he who hates bribes will live.” (15:27)

2. “Do not speak in the hearing of a fool, for he will despise the good sense of your words.” (23:9)

  • Inference: “The wise person has his eyes in his head, but the fool walks in darkness. And yet I perceived that the same event happens to all of them.” (Ecc. 2:14)

3. “Let not your heart envy sinners, but continue in the fear of the Lord all the day.” (23:17)

  • Inference: “Fret not yourself because of evildoers; be not envious of wrongdoers! (Ps. 37:1)

4. “Be not among drunkards or among gluttonous eaters of meat, for the drunkard and the glutton will come to poverty, and slumber will clothe them with rags.” (23:20-21)

  • Inference: “Who has woe? Who has sorrow? Who has strife? Who has complaining? Who has those who go to try mixed wine.” (23:29-30)

Proverbs 24, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Be not envious of evil men, nor desire to be with them, for their hearts devise violence, and their lips talk of trouble.” (24:1-2)

  • Inference: “Fret not yourself because of evildoers, and be not envious of the wicked, for the evil man has no future; the lamp of the wicked will be put out.” (24:19-20)

2. “Whoever plans to do evil will be called a schemer. The devising of folly is sin, and the scoffer is an abomination to mankind.” (24:8-9)

  • Inference: “The sacrifice of the wicked is an abomination; how much more when he brings it with evil intent.” (21:27)

3. “Does not he who keeps watch over your soul know it, and will he not repay man according to his work?” (24:12)

  • Inference: “For he will command his angels concerning you to guard you in all your ways. (Ps. 91:11)

4. “Whoever says to the wicked, ‘You are in the right,’ will be cursed by peoples, abhorred by nations, but those who rebuke the wicked will have delight, and a good blessing will come upon them.” (24:24-26)

  • Inference: “He who justifies the wicked and he who condemns the righteous are both alike an abomination to the Lord.” (17:15)

Proverbs 25, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Take away the dross from the silver, and the smith has material for a vessel; take away the wicked from the presence of the king, and his throne will be established in righteousness.” (25:4-5)

  • Inference: ““Son of man, the house of Israel has become dross to me; all of them are bronze and tin and iron and lead in the furnace; they are dross of silver. Therefore thus says the Lord God: Because you have all become dross, therefore, behold, I will gather you into the midst of Jerusalem. As one gathers silver and bronze and iron and lead and tin into a furnace, to blow the fire on it in order to melt it, so I will gather you in my anger and in my wrath, and I will put you in and melt you.” (Ezek: 22:18-20)

2. “Do not put yourself forward in the king’s presence or stand in the place of the great, for it is better to be told, “Come up here,” than to be put lower in the presence of a noble.” (25:6-7)

  • Inference: “But when you are invited, go and sit in the lowest place, so that when your host comes he may say to you, ‘Friend, move up higher.’ Then you will be honored in the presence of all who sit at table with you. For everyone who exalts himself will be humbled, and he who humbles himself will be exalted.” (Luke 14:10-11)

3. “A word fitly spoken is like apples of gold in a setting of silver.” (25:11)

  • Inference: “To make an apt answer is a joy to a man, and a word in season, how good it is!” (15:23)

4. “Like clouds and wind without rain is a man who boasts of a gift he does not give.” (25:14)

  • Inference: “Many a man proclaims his own steadfast love, but a faithful man who can find? (20:6)

5. “Let your foot be seldom in your neighbor’s house, lest he have his fill of you and hate you.” (25:17)

  • Inference: ““You shall not hate your brother in your heart, but you shall reason frankly with your neighbor, lest you incur sin because of him.” (Lev. 19:17)

6. “If your enemy is hungry, give him bread to eat, and if he is thirsty, give him water to drink, for you will heap burning coals on his head, and the Lord will reward you.” (25:21-22)

  • Inference: “To the contrary, ‘if your enemy is hungry, feed him; if he is thirsty, give him something to drink; for by so doing you will heap burning coals on his head.’ ‘Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.'” (Romans 12:20-21)

Proverbs 26, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Answer not a fool according to his folly, lest you be like him yourself. Answer a fool according to his folly lest he be wise in his own eyes.” (26:4-45)

  • Inference: “A rich man is wise in his own eyes, but a poor man who has understanding will find him out.” (28:11)

2. “Like a dog that returns to his vomit is a fool who repeats his folly.” (26:11)

  • Inference: “What the true proverb says has happened to them: ‘The dog returns to its own vomit, and the sow, after washing herself, returns to wallow in the mire.'” (2 Peter 2:22)

3. “Whoever meddles in a quarrel not his own is like one who takes a passing dog by the ears. Like a madman who throws firebrands, arrows, and death is the man who deceives his neighbor and says, ‘I am only joking!'” (26:17-18)

  • Inference: “Behold, all you who kindle a fire, who equip yourselves with burning torches! Walk by the light of your fire, and by the torches that you have kindled! This you have from my hand: you shall lie down in torment.” (Isa. 50:11)

4. “Whoever digs a pit will fall into it, and a stone will come back on him who starts it rolling. A lying tongue hates its victims, and a flattering mouth works ruin.” (26:27-28)

  • Inference: “Whoever misleads the upright into an evil way will fall into his own pit, but the blameless will have a goodly inheritance.” (28:10)

Proverbs 27, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Do not boast about tomorrow, for you do not know what a day may bring. Let another praise you, and not your own mouth; a stranger, and not your own lips.” (27:1-2)

  • Inference: “Come now, you who say, ‘Today or tomorrow we will go into such and such a town and spend a year there and trade and make a profit’— yet you do not know what tomorrow will bring. What is your life? For you are a mist that appears for a little time and then vanishes.” (James 4:13)

2. “Like a bird that strays from its nest is a man who strays from his home.” (27:8)

  • Inference: “Like a sparrow in its flitting, like a swallow in its flying, a curse that is causeless does not alight.” (26:2)

3. “Better is a neighbor who is near than a brother who is far away.” (27:10)

  • Inference: “A friend loves at all times, and a brother is born for adversity.” (17:17)

4. “The prudent sees danger and hides himself, but the simple go on and suffer for it.” (27:12)

  • Inference: “The prudent sees danger and hides himself, but the simple go on and suffer for it.” (22:3)

5. “Iron sharpens iron, and one man sharpens another.” (27:17)

  • Inference: Heb. “sharpens the face of another.”

6. “As in water face reflects face, so the heart of man reflects the man.” (27:19)

  • Inference: “If a man fathers a hundred children and lives many years, so that the days of his years are many, but his soul is not satisfied with life’s good things, and he also has no burial, I say that a stillborn child is better off than he.” (Ecc. 6:3)

Proverbs 28, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “Those who forsake the law praise the wicked, but those who keep the law strive against them.” (28:4)

  • Inference: “Evil men do not understand justice, but those who seek the Lord understand it completely.” (28:5)
  • Inference: “But when that same servant went out, he found one of his fellow servants who owed him a hundred denarii, and seizing him, he began to choke him, saying, ‘Pay what you owe.’” (Matt. 18:28)

2. “Better is a poor man who walks in his integrity than a rich man who is crooked in his ways.” (28:6)

  • Inference: “Better is a poor person who walks in his integrity than one who is crooked in speech and is a fool.” (19:1)

3. “If one turns away his ear from hearing the law, even his prayer is an abomination.” (28:9)

  • Inference: “When he is tried, let him come forth guilty; let his prayer be counted as sin!” (Ps. 109:7)

4. “Whoever conceals his transgressions will not prosper, but he who confesses and forsakes them will obtain mercy.” (28:13)

  • Inference: “. . . if I have concealed my transgressions as others do by hiding my iniquity in my heart, . .  ” (Job 31:33)

5. “Whoever works his land will have plenty of bread, but he who follows worthless pursuits will have plenty of poverty.” (28:19)

  • Inference: “Whoever works his land will have plenty of bread, but he who follows worthless pursuits lacks sense.” (12:11)

6. “Whoever rebukes a man will afterward find more favor than he who flatters with his tongue.” (28:23)

  • Inference: “Better is open rebuke than hidden love. Faithful are the wounds of a friend; profuse are the kisses of an enemy.” (27:5-6)

7. “Whoever gives to the poor will not want, but he who hides his eyes will get many a curse.” (28:27)

  • Inference: “One gives freely, yet grows all the richer; another withholds what he should give, and only suffers want.” (11:24)

Proverbs 29, The Proverbs of Solomon (cont.)
1. “He who is often reproved, yet stiffens his neck, will suddenly be broken beyond healing.” (29:1)

  • Inference: “If someone sins against a man, God will mediate for him, but if someone sins against the Lord, who can intercede for him?” But they would not listen to the voice of their father, for it was the will of the Lord to put them to death.” (1 Sam. 2:25)

2. “If a wise man has an argument with a fool, the fool only rages and laughs, and there is no quiet.” (29:9)

  • Inference: “Better is a handful of quietness than two hands full of toil and a striving after wind.” (Eccles. 4:6)

3. “The rod and reproof give wisdom, but a child left to himself brings shame to his mother.” (29:15)

  • Inference: “Discipline your son, and he will give you rest; he will give delight to your heart.” (29:17)

4. “One’s pride will bring him low, but he who is lowly in spirit will obtain honor.” (29:23)

  • Inference: “Whoever loves transgression loves strife; he who makes his door high seeks destruction.” (17:19)

5. “An unjust man is an abomination to the righteous, but one whose way is straight is an abomination to the wicked.” (29:27)

  • Inference: “. . . and said, “O Lord, God of Israel, there is no God like you, in heaven or on earth, keeping covenant and showing steadfast love to your servants who walk before you with all their heart, . . .” (2 Cor. 6:14)

Proverbs 30, The Words of Agur
1. “Every word of God proves true; he is a shield to those who take refuge in him. Do not add to his words, lest he rebuke you and you be found a liar.” (30:5-6)

  • Inference: “I warn everyone who hears the words of the prophecy of this book: if anyone adds to them, God will add to him the plagues described in this book, and if anyone takes away from the words of the book of this prophecy, God will take away his share in the tree of life and in the holy city, which are described in this book.” (Rev. 22:18-19)

2. “There are those whose teeth are swords, whose fangs are knives, to devour the poor from off the earth, the needy from among mankind.” (30:14)

  • Inference: “My soul is in the midst of lions; I lie down amid fiery beasts—the children of man, whose teeth are spears and arrows, whose tongues are sharp swords.” (Ps. 57:4)

 

Week #85; Wed, Aug 14: Proverbs 31–Ecclesiastes 9

Week #85; Wed, August 14: Proverbs 31:1–Ecclesiastes 9:18

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS AND BLOG INFORMATION:
1. Overview: This three-year complete Bible study for men and women convenes January 2018 running through December 2020 using websites below or personal resources

2. Weekday and Time: Wednesdays, 9:00—11:00 AM for each new session study, however users may choose best time to suit individual weekly needs

3. Location: Anywhere your computer, tablet, phone, cable, and/or WiFi connect to the Internet and/or use personal Bible and e-mail input to host if preferred.

4. Session Info:

  • Format—Study of the entire English Standard Version (ESV) of the Holy Bible in a dramatized audio/visual setting with ample time allotted for expansion of ideas by blogging/e-mail—word-by-word, verse-by-verse—as desired.
  • Coverage per week—Key observations for seven to ten chapters are presented here every Wednesday morning in accordance with the schedule at link “5-Schedule” in above home menu.
  • Audio/Visual software—Use free ESV with PC downloads and/or tablet or phone apps for full coverage of text at: http://www.jwaministries.net.

5. This week’s Observations:

  • Wisdom literature—Job, Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and Song of Solomon are five biblical books that emphasize our need to understand and attain wisdom for all areas of life, including our relationships with God and with one another.
  • ExampleProverbs 1:2-7 says: “To know wisdom and instruction, to understand words of insight, to receive instruction in wise dealing, in righteousness, justice, and equity; to give prudence to the simple, knowledge and discretion to the youth—Let the wise hear and increase in learning, and the one who understands obtain guidance, to understand a proverb and a saying, the words of the wise and their riddles. The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge; fools despise wisdom and instruction.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Proverbs 31, The Words of King Lemuel
1. King Lemuel attributes the words of this proverb to his mother. She give strong counsel to her son on not giving his strength to women, drinking too much wine or strong drink, but to serve the mute, the destitute, and the poor.

  • Inference: “Give strong drink to the one who is perishing, and wine to those in bitter distress; let them drink and forget their poverty and remember their misery no more.” (31:6)

2. The King’s mother describes the woman who fears the Lord.

  • Inference: “An excellent wife who can find? She is far more precious than jewels. (31:10)
  • Inference: “The heart of her husband trusts in her, and he will have no lack of gain. (31:11)
  • Inference: “She does him good, and not harm, all the days of her life.” (31:12)
  • Inference: “She opens her hand to the poor and reaches out her hands to the needy.” (31:20)
  • Inference: “Her husband is known in the gates when he sits among the elders of the land.” (31:23)
  • Inference: “Strength and dignity are her clothing, and she laughs at the time to come. She opens her mouth with wisdom, and the teaching of kindness is on her tongue.” (31:25-26)
  • Inference: “Charm is deceitful, and beauty is vain, but a woman who fears the Lord is to be praised.” (31:30)

Ecclesiastes 1All Is Vanity
1. Solomon describes vanity.

  • Inference: “What does man gain by all the toil at which he toils under the sun?” (1:3)
  • Inference: “The sun rises . . . , the wind blows . . . , streams run . . . , All things are full of weariness; a man cannot utter it . . . ” (1:5-8)
  • Inference: “I have seen everything that is done under the sun, and behold, all is vanity and a striving after wind.” (1:14)
  • Inference: “For in much wisdom is much vexation, and he who increases knowledge increases sorrow.” (1:18)

Ecclesiastes 2, The Vanity of Self-Indulgence
1. “I (Solomon) said in my heart, ‘Come now, I will test you with pleasure; enjoy yourself.'” (2:1)

  • Inference: “I searched with my heart how to cheer my body with wine–my heart still guiding me with wisdom–and how to lay hold on folly, till I might see what was good for the children of man to do under heaven during the few days of their life.” (2:3)
  • Inference: “So I became great and surpassed all who were before me in Jerusalem. Also my wisdom remained with me. And whatever my eyes desired I did not keep from them.” (2:9)
  • Inference: “Then I considered all that my hands had done and the toil I had expended in doing it, and behold, all was vanity and a striving after wind, and there was nothing to be gained under the sun.” (2:11)
  • Inference: “So I turned to consider wisdom and madness and folly. . . . Then I saw that there is more gain in wisdom than in folly, as there is more gain in light than in darkness.” (2:12-13)
  • Inference: “Then I said in my heart, ‘What happens to the fool will happen to me also. Why then have I been so very wise?’ And I said in my heart that this also is vanity.” (2:15)
  • Inference: “For of the wise as of the fool there is no enduring remembrance, seeing that the days to come all will have been long forgotten. How the wise dies just like the fool.” (2:16)
  • Inference: “I hated all my toil in which I toil under the sun, seeing that I must leave it to the man who will come after me, and who knows whether he will be wise or a fool?” (2:18-19)
  • Inference: “There is nothing better for a person than that he should eat and drink and find enjoyment in his toil. This also, I saw, is from the hand of God, for apart from him who can eat or who can have enjoyment? For to the one who pleases him God has given wisdom and knowledge and joy, but to the singer he has given the business of gathering and collecting, only to give to one who pleases God. This also is vanity and a striving after wind.” (2:24-26)

Ecclesiastes 3, A Time for Everything
1. “For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven: . . .” (3:1)

  • Inference: “a time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up what is planted; a time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up; a time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance; a time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing; a time to seek, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away; a time to tear, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak; a time to love, and a time to hate; a time for war, and a time for peace.” (3:2-8)
  • Inference: “I have seen the business that God has given to the children of man to be busy with. He has made everything beautiful in its time. Also, he has put eternity into man’s heart, yet so that he cannot find out what God has done from the beginning to the end. I perceived that there is nothing better for them than to be joyful and to do good as long as they live; also that everyone should eat and drink and take pleasure in all his toil–that is God’s gift to man.” (3:9-13)
  • Inference: “Moreover, I saw under the sun that in the place of justice, even there was wickedness, and in the place of righteousness, even there was wickedness.” (3:16)
  • Inference: “For what happens to the children of man and what happens to the beasts is the same; as one dies, so dies the other. They all have the same breath, and man has no advantage over the beasts, for all is vanity. All go to one place. All are from the dust, and to dust all return. Who knows whether the spirit of man goes upward and the spirit of the beast goes down into the earth?” (3:19-20)

Ecclesiastes 4, Evil Under the Sun
1. “Again I saw all the oppressions that are done under the sun.” (4:1)

  • Inference: “And behold, the tears of the oppressed, and they had no one to comfort them!” (4:1)
  • Inference: “And I thought the dead who are already dead more fortunate than the living who are still alive.” (4:2)
  • Inference: “Then I saw that all toil and all skill in work come from a man’s envy of his neighbor. This also is vanity and a striving after wind.” (4:4)
  • Inference: “Two are better than one, because they have a good reward for their toil. For it they fall, one will lift up his fellow. But woe to him who is alone when he falls and has not another to lift him up!” (4:9-10)
  • Inference: “And though a man might prevail against one who is alone, two will withstand him–a threefold cord is not easily broken.” (4:12)

Ecclesiastes 5, Fear God
1. “Guard your steps when you go to the house of God.” (5:1)

  • Inference: “Be not rash with your mouth, nor let your heart be hasty to utter a word before God, for God is in heaven and you are on earth. Therefore let you words be few.” (5:2)
  • Inference: “When you vow a vow to God, do not delay paying it, for he has no pleasure in fools. Pay what you vow. It is better that you should not vow than that you should vow and not pay.” (5:4-5)
  • Inference: “If you see in a province the oppression of the poor and the violation of justice and righteousness, do not be amazed at the matter, for the high official is watched by a higher, and there are yet higher ones over them.” (5:8)

2. “He who loves money will not be satisfied with money, nor he who loves wealth with his income; this also is vanity.” (5:10)

  • Inference: “When goods increase, they increase who eat them, and what advantage has their owner but to see them with his eyes.” (5:11)
  • Inference: “There is a grievous evil that I have seen under the sun: riches were kept by their owner to his hurt, and those riches were lost by bad venture.” (5:13)
  • Inference: “As he came from his mother’s womb he shall go again, naked as he came, and shall take nothing for his toil that he may carry away in his hand. (5:15)

3. “Behold, what I have seen to be good and fitting is to eat and drink and find enjoyment in all the toil with which one toils under the sun the few days of his life that God has given him, for this is his lot.” (5:18)

Ecclesiastes 6, Striving After Wind
1. “There is an evil that I have seen under the sun, and it lies heavy on mankind; a man to whom God gives wealth, possessions, and honor, so that he lacks nothing of all that he desires, yet God does not give him power to enjoy them, but a stranger enjoys them. This is vanity; it is a grievous evil.” (6:1-2)

2. “If a man fathers a hundred children and lives many years, so that the days of his years are many, but his soul is not satisfied with life’s good things, and he also has ho burial, I say that a still born child is better off than he.” (6:3)

3. “For who knows what is good for man while he lives the few days of his vain life, which he passes like a shadow? For who can tell man what will be after him under the sun?” (6:12)

Ecclesiastes 7, The Contrast of Wisdom and Folly
1. “A good name is better than precious ointment, and the day of death than the day of birth.” (7:1)

2. “It is better for a man to hear the rebuke of the wise than to hear the song of fools.” (7:5)

3. “Be not quick in your spirit to become angry, for anger lodges in the bosom of fools.” (7:9)

4. “Consider the work of God: who can make straight what he has made crooked?” (7:13)

5. “Surely there is not a righteous man on earth who does good and never sins.” (7:20)

6. “See, this alone I found, that God made man upright, but they have sought out many schemes.” (7:29)

Ecclesiastes 8, Keep the King’s Command
1. “Who is like the wise? And who knows the interpretation of a thing? A man’s wisdom makes his face shine, and the hardness of his face is changed.” (8:1)

2. “Whoever keeps a command will know no evil thing, and the wise heart will know the proper time and the just way.” (8:5)

3. “No man has power to retain the spirit, or power over the day of death.” (8:8)

4. “Because the sentence against an evil deed is not executed speedily, the heart of the children of man is fully set to do evil.” (8:11)

Ecclesiastes 9, Death Comes to All
1. “It is the same for all since the same event happens to the righteous and the wicked, to the good and the evil, to the clean and the unclean, to him who sacrifices and him who does not sacrifice. As the good one is, sons the sinner, and he who swears is as he who shuns an oath.” (9:2)

2. “Again I saw that under the sun the race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, nor bread to the wise, nor riches to the intelligent, nor favor to those with knowledge, but time and chance happen to them all.” (9:11)

3. “The words of the wise heard in quiet are better than the shouting of a ruler among fools. Wisdom is better than weapons of war, but one sinner destroys much good.” (9:17-18)

Week #86; Wed, Aug 21: Ecclesiastes 10–Solomon–Isaiah 2

Week #86; Wed, August 21: Ecclesiastes 10:1–Solomon–Isaiah 2:22

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Heart and soul are terms that Solomon used to convey his depth for what he wrote.

2. King Solomon “. . . spoke 3,000 proverbs, and his songs were 1,005.” (1 Kings 4:32)

3. As a precursor to change from law to grace, the Lord told Isaiah to write, “Bring no more vain offerings; incense is an abomination to me.” (1:13)

4. Ultimately, “. . . the Lord alone will be exalted in that day (of the Lord)” (2:11, 17; 2 Peter 3)

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Ecclesiastes 10, A Wise Man’s heart inclines him to the Right
1. “A wise man’s heart inclines him to the right, but a fool’s heart to the left.” (10:2)

  • Inference: “Inclinations come from the heart.” (10:2)

2. “The words of a wise man’s mouth win him favor, but the lips of a fool consume him.” (10:12)

  • Inference: “The beginning of the words of his mouth is foolishness, and the end of his talk is evil madness.” (10:13)

Ecclesiastes 11Cast Your Bread upon the Water
1. “But know that for all these things God will bring you into judgment.” (11:9)

  • Inference: “Remove vexation (annoyed, frustrated, worried) from your heart, and put away pain from your body, for youth and dawn of life are vanity.” (11:10)

Ecclesiastes 12, RememberYour Creator in Your Youth
1. “Remember also your Creator in the days of your youth, . . . because man is going to his eternal home, and the mourners go about the streets . . . ” (12:1, 5)

  • Inference: “. . . the dust returns to the earth as it was, and the spirit returns to God who gave it.” (12:7)
  • Inference: “Vanity of vanities, says the Preacher; all is vanity.” (12:8)

2. “Besides being wise, the Preacher also taught the people knowledge, weighing and studying and arranging many proverbs with great care. The Preacher sought to find words of delight, and uprightly he wrote words of truth.” (12:9, 10)

  • Inference: “. . . they are all given by one Shepherd,” (12:11)
  • Inference: “Give ear, O Shepherd of Israel, you who lead Joseph like a flock! You who are enthroned upon the cherubim, shine forth.” (Ps. 80:1)

3. “The end of the matter; all has been heard. Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole cut of man.” (12:13)

  • Inference: “For God will bring every deed into judgment, with every secret thing, whether good or evil.” (12:14)

The Song of Solomon 1, The Bride Confesses Her Love
1. “The Song of Songs, which is Solomon’s. (1:1)

  • Inference: King Solomon “. . . spoke 3,000 proverbs, and his songs were 1,005.” (1 Kings 4:32)

2. This song is a record of Solomon and his bride’s delight for each other with comments by others. (1:2-17)

  • Inference: Solomon and his bride are deeply in love; physical appeal is expressed. (1:2-17)

The Song of Solomon 2, A Rose of Sharon
1. “My beloved is mine, and I am his . . .” (2:16)

  • Inference: Adoration abounds between Solomon and his bride.

The Song of Solomon 3, The Bride’s Dream
1. Solomon arrives for the wedding in a choice carriage with sixty mighty men of Israel wearing swords. (3:7-10)

  • Inference: It was the “. . . day of gladness of his heart.” (3:11)

The Song of Solomon 4, Solomon Admires His Bride’s Beauty
1. Solomon admires in full detail his bride’s beauty (4:1-5)

  • Inference: “You have captivated my heart, my sister, my bride; you have captivated my heart with one glance of your eyes, with one jewel of your necklace.” (4:9)

The Song of Solomon 5, The Bride Searches for Her Beloved
1. “. . . her beloved had turned and gone.” (5:6)

  • Inference: Others make little of her loss. (5:7-9)
  • Inference: The bride praises her beloved. (5:10-16)

The Song of Solomon 6, Together in the Garden of Love
1. Others help his bride seek him. (6:1)

  • Inference: Solomon and his bride are reunited in his garden of lilies and spices. (6:2-3)
  • Inference: Solomon and his bride delight in each other (6:4-13)

The Song of Solomon 7, The Bride Gives Her Love
1. “I am my beloved’s, and his desire is for me.” (7:10)

  • Inference: “My beloved is mine, and I am his . . .” (2:16, 6:3)

The Song of Solomon 8, Longing for Her Beloved
1. “Set me as a seal upon your heart, as a seal upon your arm, for love is strong as death, jealousy is fierce as the grave. Its flashes are flashes of fire, the very flame of the Lord.” (8:6)

  • Inference: “Many waters cannot quench love, neither can floods drown it.” (8:7)

Isaiah 1, The Wickedness of Judah
1. “The vision of Isaiah the son of Amoz, which he saw concerning Judah and Jerusalem in the days of Uzziah, Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, kings of Judah. (1:1)

  • Inference: “Hear, O heavens, and give ear, O earth; for the Lord has spoken: Children have I reared and brought up, but they have rebelled against me.” (1:2)
  • Inference: “. . . but Israel does not know, my people do not understand.” (1:3)

2. “Ah, sinful nation, a people laden with iniquity, offspring of evildoers, children who deal corruptly!” (1:4)

  • Inference: “They have forsaken the Lord, they have despised the Holy One of Israel, they are utterly estranged.” (1:4)

3. “Your country lies desolate; your cities are burned with fire; in your very presence foreigners devour your land; it is desolate, as overthrown by foreigners. (1:7)

  • Inference: “The daughter of Zion is left like a booth in a vineyard, like a lodge in a cucumber field, like a besieged city.” (1:8)

4. “I have had enough of burnt offerings of rams and the fat of well-fed beasts; I do not delight in the blood of bulls, or of lambs, or of goats.” (1:11)

  • Inference: “Bring no more vain offerings; incense is an abomination to me.” (1:13)
  • Inference: “Wash yourselves; make yourselves clean; remove the evil of your deeds from before my eyes; cease to do evil, learn to do good; seek justice, correct oppression; bring justice to the fatherless, plead the widow’s cause.” (1:16-17)
  • Inference: “Come now, let us reason together, says the Lord: though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they shall become like wool.” (1:18)

5. “How the faithful city has become a whore she who was full of justice! Righteousness lodged in her, but now murderers.” (1:21)

  • Inference: “Therefore the Lord declares, the Lord of hosts, the Mighty One of Israel: ‘Ah, I will get relief from my enemies and avenge myself on my foes. I will turn my hand against you and will smelt away your dross as with lye and remove all your alloy.'” (1:24)
  • Inference: “Zion shall be redeemed by justice, and those in her who repent, by righteousness.” (1:27)

Isaiah 2, The Mountain of the Lord
1. “It shall come to pass in the latter days that the mountain of the house of the Lord shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and shall be lifted up above the hills; and all the nations shall flow to it, and many peoples shall come, and say: ‘Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob, that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths.'” (2:3)

  • Inference: “For out of Zion shall go the law, and the word of the Lord from Jerusalem.” (2:3)
  • Inference: “He shall judge between the nations, and shall decide disputes for many peoples; and they shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks; nation shall not lift up sword against nation, neither shall they learn war anymore.” (2:4)

2. “Enter into the rock and hide in the dust from before the terror of the Lord, and from the splendor of his majesty.” (2:10)

  • Inference: “. . . the Lord alone will be exalted in that day (of the Lord)” (2:11, 17; 2 Peter 3)
  • Inference: “And people shall enter the caves of the rocks and the holes of the ground, from before the terror of the Lord, and from the splendor of his majesty, when he rises to terrify the earth.” (2:19)’
  • Inference: “In that day mankind will cast away their idols of silver and their idols of gold, which they made for themselves to worship . . .” (2:20)

Week #87; Wed, Aug 28: Isaiah 3–10

Week #87; Wed, August 28: Isaiah 3:1–Isaiah 10:34

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Isaiah’s single vision predicts the fall of Judah and Jerusalem because of their deeds against the Lord.

2. Israel and Syria came to wage war against Jerusalem.

3. A remnant would survive; but, the combination of Assyria and Egypt was too overwhelming.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Isaiah 3, Judgment on Judah and Jerusalem
1. “For behold, the Lord God of hosts is taking away from Jerusalem and from Judah support and supply, all support of bread, and all support of water; the mighty man and the soldier, the judge and the prophet, the diviner and the elder, the captain of fifty and the man of rank, the counselor and the skillful magician and the expert in charms.” (3:1-3)

  • Inference: “And I will make boys their princes, and infants shall rule over them. And the people will oppress one another, every one his fellow and every one his neighbor.” (3:4-5)

2. “For Jerusalem has stumbled, and Judah has fallen, because their speech and their deeds are against the Lord, defying his glorious presence.” (3:8)

  • Inference: “For the look on their faces bears witness against them; they proclaim their sin like Sodom; they do not hide it. Woe to them! For they have brought evil on themselves.” (3:9)

Isaiah 4, The Branch of the Lord Glorified
1. It appears that a milestone is reached when the term “called by your name” is stated as a lament by the survivors of Israel. (4:1)

  • Inference: “In that day the branch of the Lord shall be beautiful and glorious, and the fruit of the land shall be the pride and honor of the survivors of Israel.” (4:2)
  • Inference: “And he who is left in Zion and remains in Jerusalem will be called holy, everyone who has been recorded for life in Jerusalem, when the Lord shall have washed away the filth of the daughters of Zion and cleansed the bloodstains of Jerusalem from its midst by a spirit of judgment and by a spirit of burning. Then the Lord will create over the whole site of Mount Zion and over her assemblies a cloud by day, and smoke and the shining of a flaming fire by night; for over all the glory there will be a canopy.” (4:3-5)
  • Inference: “In days to come Jacob shall take root, Israel shall blossom and put forth shoots and fill the whole world with fruit.” (27:6)

Isaiah 5, The Vineyard of the Lord Destroyed
1. “For the vineyard of the Lord of hosts is the house of Israel, and the men of Judah are his pleasant planting; and he looked for justice, but behold, bloodshed; for righteousness, but behold, an outcry!” (5:7)

  • Inference: “. . . but they do not regard the deeds of the Lord, or see the work of his hands.” (5:12)

2. “Therefore my people go into exile for lack of knowledge; their honored men go hungry, and their multitude is parched with thirst.” (5:13)

  • Inference: “Man is humbled, and each one is brought low, and the eyes of the haughty are brought low. But the Lord of hosts is exalted in justice, and the Holy God shows himself holy in righteousness.” (5:15-16)
  • Inference: “Woe to those who call evil good and good evil, who put darkness for light and light for darkness who put bitter for sweet and sweet for bitter.” (5:20)

3. “. . . for they have rejected the law of the Lord of hosts, and have despised the word of the Holy One of Israel. Therefore the anger of the Lord was kindled against his people, and he stretched out his hand against them and struck them, and the mountains quaked; and their corpses were as refuse in the midst of the streets.” (5:24-25)

  • Inference: “For all this his anger has not turned away, and his hand is stretched out still.” (5:25)
  • Inference: “He will raise a signal for nations far away, and whistle for them from the ends of the earth; and behold, quickly, speedily they come!” (5:26)

Isaiah 6, Isaiah’s Vision of the Lord
1. “In the year that King Uzziah died I saw the Lord sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up; and the train of his robe filled the temple.” (6:1)

  • Inference: “And I said: Woe is me! For I am lost; for I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips; for my eyes have seen the King, the Lord of hosts!” (6:5)

2. “Then one of the seraphim flew to me, having in his hand a burning coal that he had taken with tongs from the altar. And he touched my mouth and said: ‘Behold, this has touched your lips; your guilt is taken away, and your sin atoned for.'” (6:7)

3. “And I heard the voice of the Lord saying, ‘Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then I said, ‘Here am i! Send me.’ And he said, ‘Go, and say to this people:” (6:8)

  • Inference: “Make the heart of this people dull, and their ears heavy, and blind their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their hearts, and turn and be healed.” (6:10)
  • Inference: “Then I said, ‘How long, O Lord?’ And he said: Until cities lie waste without inhabitant, and houses without people, and the land is a desolate waste, and the Lord removes people far away and the forsaken places are many in the midst of the land.” (6:11-12)

Isaiah 7, Isaiah Sent to King Ahaz
1. Syria and Israel colluded together to defeat Judah and Jerusalem. (7:1-6)

  • Inference: But, the Lord God says, “It shall not stand, and it shall not come to pass. For the head of Syria is Damascus, and the head of Damascus is Rezin. And within sixty-five years Ephraim will be shattered from being a people. And the head of Ephraim is Samaria, and the head of Samaria is the son of Remaliah. If you are not firm in faith, you will not be firm at all.” (7:8-9)

2. The sign of Immanuel: “Behold, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and shall call his name Immanuel. He shall eat curds and honey when he knows how to refuse the evil and choose the good. For before the boy knows how to refuse the evil and , the land whose two kings you dread will be deserted.” (7:14-16)

  • Inference: “In that day the Lord will shave with a razor that is hired beyond the River–with the king of Assyria–the head and the hair of the feet, and it will sweep away the beard also.” (7:20)

Isaiah 8, The Coming Assyrian Invasion
1. “. . . the wealth of Damascus and the spoil of Samaria will be carried away before the king of Assyria.” (8:4)

  • Inference: “. . . behold, the Lord is bringing up against them the waters of the River, mighty and many, the king of Assyria and all his glory. And it will rise over all its channels and go over all its banks, and it will sweep on into Judah, it will overflow and pass on, reaching even to the neck, and its outspread wings will fill the breadth of your land, O Immanuel.” (8:7-8)

2. “But the Lord of hosts, him you shall honor as holy. Let him be your fear, and let him be your dread.” (8:13)

  • Inference: “And he will become a sanctuary and a stone of offense and a rock of stumbling to both houses of Israel, a trap and a snare to the inhabitants of Jerusalem. And many shall stumble on it. They shall fall and be broken; they shall be snared and taken.” (8:14-15)
  • Inference: “And they will be thrust into thick darkness.” (8:22)

Isaiah 9, For to Us a Child Is Born
1. “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace. Of the increase his government and of peace there will be no end, on the throne of David and over his kingdom, to establish it and to uphold it with justice and with righteousness from this time forth and forevermore. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.” (9:6-7)

  • Inference: Jesus is on the way.

Isaiah 10, Judgment on Arrogant Assyria
1. “When the Lord has finished all his work on Mount Zion and on Jerusalem, he will punish the speech of the arrogant heart of the king of Assyria and the boastful look in his eyes.” (10:12)

  • Inference: “The light of Israel will become a fire, and his Holy One a flame, and it will burn and devour his thorns and briers in one day.” (10:17)

2. “A remnant will return, the remnant of Jacob, to the mighty God. For though your people Israel be as the sand of the sea, only a remnant of them will return.” (10:21)

  • Inference: “O my people, who dwell in Zion, be not afraid of the Assyrians when they strike with the rod and lift up their staff against you as the Egyptians did.” (10:24)

 

Week #88; Wed, Sep 04: Isaiah 11-21

Week #88; Wed, Sep 04: Isaiah 11:1-21:17

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The fall of Lucifer in chapter 14 is significant. The war in heaven originated when Lucifer said, “I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.” (14:12-14)

2. Satan thrown down to earth is described by John in Revelation 12, “Now war arose in heaven, Michael and his angels fighting against the dragon. And the dragon and his angels fought back, but he was defeated, and there was no longer any place for them in heaven. And the great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world—he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him.” (Revelation 12:7-9)

  • Inference: It appears that kairos and chronos concepts of time impact our understanding of both Isaiah and Revelation.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Isaiah 11, The Righteous Reign of the Branch
1. “There shall come forth a shoot from the stump of Jesse, and a branch from his roots shall bear fruit.” (11:1)

  • Inference: “And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him, the Spirit of wisdom and understanding, the Spirit of counsel and might, the Spirit of knowledge and the fear of the Lord.” (11:2)
  • Inference: “And his delight shall be in the fear of the Lord. He shall not judge by what his eyes see, or decide disputes by what his ears hear, but with righteousness he shall judge the poor, and decide with equity for the meek of the earth; and he shall strike the earth with the rod of his mouth, and with the breath of his lips he shall kill the wicked. Righteousness shall be the belt of his waist, and faithfulness the belt of his loins.” (11:3-5)
  • Inference: “The wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and the leopard shall lie down with the young goat, and the calf and the lion and the fattened calf together; and a little child shall lead them. The cow and the bear shall graze; their young shall lie down together; and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. The nursing child shall play over the hole of the cobra, and the weaned child shall put his hand on the adder’s den. They shall not hurt or destroy in all my holy mountain; for the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover the sea.” (11:6-9)

2. “In that day the Lord will extend his hand yet a second time to recover the remnant that remains of his people, from Assyria, from Egypt, from Pathros, from Cush, from Elam, from Shinar, from Hamath, and from the coastlands of the sea.” (11:11)

  • Inference: “He will raise a signal for the nations and will assemble the banished of Israel, and gather the dispersed of Judah from the four corners of the earth.” (11:12)

Isaiah 12, The Lord Is My Strength and My Song
1. “Behold, God is my salvation; I will trust, and will not be afraid; for the Lord God is my strength and my song, and he has become my salvation.” (12:2)

2. “Shout, and sing for joy, O inhabitant of Zion, for great in your midst is the Holy One of Israel.” (12:6)

Isaiah 13, The Judgment of Babylon
1. “The Lord of hosts is mustering a host for battle. They come from a distant land, from the end of the heavens, the Lord and the weapons of his indignation, to destroy the whole land.” (13:4-5)

  • Inference: “Behold, the day of the Lord comes, cruel, with wrath and fierce anger, to make the land a desolation and to destroy its sinners from it.” (13:9)
  • Inference: “For the stars of the heavens and their constellations will not give their light. I will punish the world for its evil, and the wicked for their iniquity; I will put an end to the pomp of the arrogant, and lay low the pompous pride of the ruthless.” (13:10-11)
  • Inference: “And Babylon, the glory of kingdoms, the splendor and pomp of the Chaldeans, will be like Sodom and Gomorrah when God overthrew them. (13:19)
  • Inference: “Though Babylon should mount up to heaven, and though she should fortify her strong height, yet destroyers would come from me against her, declares the Lord.” (Jeremiah 51:53)

Isaiah 14, The Restoration of Jacob and The Fall of Lucifer
1. The fall of Lucifer . . . “How you are fallen from heaven, O Day Star, son of Dawn! How you are cut down to the ground, you who laid the nations low! You said in your heart, ‘I will ascend to heaven; above the stars of God I will set my throne on high; I will sit on the mount of assembly in the far reaches of the north; I will ascend above the heights of the clouds; I will make myself like the Most High.'” (14:12-14)

  • Inference: “On that day the Lord will punish the host of heaven, in heaven, and the kings of the earth, on the earth.” (24:21)
  • Inference: “Their slain shall be cast out, and the stench of their corpses shall rise; the mountains shall flow with their blood.” (34:3)
  • Inference: “If they dig into Sheol, from there shall my hand take them; if they climb up to heaven, from there I will bring them down. If they hide themselves on the top of Carmel, from there I will search them out and take them; and if they hide from my sight at the bottom of the sea, there I will command the serpent, and it shall bite them. And if they go into captivity before their enemies, there I will command the sword, and it shall kill them; and I will fix my eyes upon them for evil and not for good.” (Amos 9:2)
  • Inference: “And you, Capernaum, will you be exalted to heaven? You will be brought down to Hades. For if the mighty works done in you had been done in Sodom, it would have remained until this day.” (Matthew 11:23; Luke 10:15, Daniel 5:22-23, and Revelation 12:7-9 pertain)

2. “I will rise up against them,” declares the Lord of hosts, “and will cut off from Babylon name and remnant, descendants and posterity,” declares the Lord. (14:22)

3. On Assyria: “I will break the Assyrian in my land, and on my mountains trample him underfoot; and his yoke shall depart from them, and his burden from their shoulder.” (14:25)

4. On Philistia: “. . . I will kill your root with famine, and your remnant it will slay.” (14:30)

5. “The Lord has founded Zion, and in her the afflicted of his people find refuge.” (14:32)

Isaiah 15, An Oracle Concerning Moab
1. “Moab is undone.” (see 15:1, and 16:13 below)

Isaiah 16, Send the Lamb
1. “This is the word that the Lord spoke concerning Moab in the past. But now the Lord has spoken, saying, ‘In three years, like the years of a hired worker, the glory of Moab will be brought into contempt, in spite of all his great multitude, and those who remain will be very few and feeble'” (16:13)

Isaiah 17, An Oracle Concerning Damascus
1. “Behold, Damascus will cease to be a city and will become a heap of ruins.” (17:1)

2. “And it shall be as when the reaper gathers standing grain and his arm harvests the ears, and as when one gleans the ears of grain in the Valley of Rephaim.” (17:5)

  • Inference: “In that day man will look to his Maker, and his eyes will look on the Holy One of Israel.” (17:7)

Isaiah 18, An Oracle Concerning Cush
1. “All you inhabitants of the world, you who dwell on the earth, when a signal is raised on the mountains, look! When a trumpet is blown, hear!” (18:3)

2. “At that time tribute will be brought to the Lord of hosts from a people tall and smooth, from a people feared near and far, a nation mighty and conquering, whose land the rivers divide, to Mount Zion, the place of the name of the Lord of hosts.” (18:7)

Isaiah 19, An Oracle Concerning Egypt
1. “Behold, the Lord is riding on a swift cloud and comes to Egypt; and the idols of Egypt will tremble at his presence, and the heart of the Egyptians will melt within them.” (19:1)

  • Inference: “And there will be nothing for Egypt that head or tail, palm branch or reed, may do.” (19:15)

2. Egypt, Assyria, Israel Blessed. “In that day the Egyptians will be like women, and tremble with fear before the hand that the Lord of hosts shakes over them. And the land of Judah will become a terror to the Egyptians. Everyone to whom it is mentioned will fear because of the purpose that the Lord of hosts has purposed against them.” (19:16-17)

  • Inference: “In that day there will be an altar to the Lord in the midst of the land of Egypt, and a pillar to the Lord at its border.” (19:19)
  • Inference: “When they cry to the Lord because of oppressors, he will send them a savior and defender, and deliver them. (19:20)
  • Inference: “And the Lord will make himself known to the Egyptians, and the Egyptians will know the Lord in that day and worship with sacrifice and offering, and they will make vows to the Lord and perform them.” (19:20)

Isaiah 20, A Sign Against Egypt and Cush

1. “As my servant Isaiah has walked naked and barefoot for three years as a sign and a portent against Egypt and Cush, so shall the king of Assyria lead away the Egyptian captives and the Cushite exiles, both the young and the old . . . ” (20:3)

2. “And the inhabitants of this coastland will say in that day, ‘Behold, this is what has happened to those in whom we hoped and to whom we fled for help to be delivered from the king of Assyria! And we, how shall we escape?'” (20:6)

Isaiah 21, Fallen, Fallen Is Babylon
1. “For thus the Lord said to me, ‘Within a year, according to the years of a hired worker, all the glory of Kedar will come to an end. And the remainder of the archers of the mighty men of the sons of Kedar will be few, for theLord, the God of Israel, has spoken.” (21:16)

 

Week #89; Wed, Sep 11: Isaiah 22–29

Week #89; Wed, Sep 11: Isaiah 22:1–29:24

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. The remainder of our blog reading schedule in the old testament (BCE-before current era of Christ or BC) covers the books of the 5 major prophets (Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Ezekiel, and Daniel) and the books of the 12 minor prophets (Hosea, Joel, Amos, Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, and Malachi).

  • Inference: The major prophets address broader topics and the minor prophets address narrower topics; the major prophets begin the books of prophecy and are longer.
  • Inference: The prophets point to Christ’s birth, sacrifice, and return.
  • Inference: God’s wrath, grace, and mercy are on display in all of the prophets.
  • Inference: The prophets apply to BCE/BC and now (CE-current era of Christ or AD).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Isaiah 22, Oracle Concerning Jerusalem
1. “All your leaders have fled together; without the bow they were captured. All of you who were found were captured, though they had fled far away.” (22:3)

  • Inference: “Your choicest valleys were full of chariots, and the horsemen took their stand at the gates. He has taken away the covering of Judah.” (22:7-8)

2. “In that day you looked to the weapons of the House of the Forest, and you saw that the breaches of the city of David were many.” (22:8-9)

  • Inference: “But you did not look to him who did it, or see him who planned it long ago.” (22:11)

3. “In that day I will call my servant Eliakim the son of Hilkiah, and I will cloth him with your robe, and will bind your sash on him, and will commit your authority to his hand. And he shall be a father to the inhabitants of Jerusalem and to the house of Judah. And I will place on his shoulder the key of the house of David. He shall open, and none shall shut; and he shall shut, and none shall open. And I will fasten him like a peg in a secure place, and he will become a throne of honor to his father’s house.” (22:20-23)

  • Inference: “In that day, declares the Lord of host, the peg that was fastened in a secure place will give way, and it will be cut down and fall, and the load that was on it will be cut off, for the Lord has spoken.” (22:25)

Isaiah 23, An Oracle Concerning Tyre and Sidon
1. Tyre and Sidon are port cities on the Mediterranean Sea in Lebanon and existed before Christ; they suffered defeats from Nebuchadnezzar, Alexander the Great, and Persia’s Artexarxes. They also supplied building materials and furnishings for Solomon’s first temple and for the rebuilding of the temple in Ezra’s time.

  • Inference: “Wail, O ships of Tarshish, for Tyre is laid waste, without house or harbor!” (23:1)

2. “The Lord of hosts has purposed it, to defile the pompous pride of all glory, to dishonor all the honored of the earth.” (23:9)

  • Inference: “He has stretched out his hand over the sea; he has shaken the kingdoms; the Lord has given command concerning Canaan to destroy its strongholds.” (23:11)
  • Inference: “In that day Tyre will be forgotten for seventy years, like the days of one king. At the end of seventy years, it will happen to Tyre as in the song of the prostitute . . .” (23:15)
  • Inference: “At the end of seventy years, the Lord will visit Tyre, and she will return to her wages and will prostitute herself with all the kingdoms of the world on the face of the earth. Her merchandise and her wages will be holy to the Lord. It will not be stored or hoarded, but her merchandise will supply abundant food and fine clothing for those who dwell before the Lord.” (23:17-18)

Isaiah 24, Judgment on the Whole Earth
1. “Behold, the Lord will empty the earth and make it desolate, and he will twist its surface and scatter its inhabitants. And it shall be, as with the people, so with the priest; as with the slave, so with his master; as with the maid, so with her mistress; as with the buyer, so with the seller; as with the lender, so with the borrower; as with the creditor, so with the debtor. The earth shall be utterly empty and utterly plundered; for the Lord has spoken this word.” (24:1-3)

  • Inference: “The earth lies defiled under its inhabitants; for they have transgressed the laws, violated the statutes, broken the everlasting covenant.” (24:5)
  • Inference: “Terror and the pit and the snare are upon you, O inhabitant of the earth!” (24:17)

2. “On that day the Lord will punish the host of heaven, in heaven, and the kings of the earth, on the earth.” (24:21)

  • Inference: “They will be gathered together as prisoners in a pit; they will be shut up in a prison, and after many days they will be punished.” (24:22)
  • Inference: “Then the moon will be confounded and the sun ashamed, for the Lord of hosts reigns on Mount Zion and in Jerusalem, and his glory will be before his elders.” (24:23)

Isaiah 25, God Will Swallow Up Death Forever
1. “O Lord, you are my God; I will exalt you; I will praise your name, for you have done wonderful things, plans formed of old, faithful and sure.” (25:1)

  • Inference: “On this mountain the Lord of hosts will make for all peoples a feast of rich food, a feast of well-aged wine, of rich food full of marrow, of aged wine well refined.” (25:6)

2. “He will swallow up death forever; and the Lord God will wipe away tears from all faces, and the reproach of his people he will take away from all the earth, for the Lord has spoken.” (25:8)

  • Inference: “It will be said on that day, ‘Behold, this is our God; we have waited for him that he might save us. This is the Lord; we have waited for him; let us be glad and rejoice in his salvation.'” (25:9)

Isaiah 26, You Keep Him in Perfect Peace
1. “Trust in the Lord forever, for the Lord God is an everlasting rock. For he has humbled the inhabitants of the height, the lofty city. He lays it low, lays it low to the ground, casts it to the dust.” (26:4-5)

  • Inference: “The path of the righteous is level; you make level the way of the righteous.” (26:7)
  • Inference: “If favor is shown to the wicked, he does not learn righteousness; in the land of uprightness he deals corruptly and does not see the majesty of the Lord.” (26:10)

2. “Your dead shall live; their bodies shall rise. You who dwell in the dust, awake and sing for joy! For your dew is a dew of light, and the earth will give birth to the dead.” (26:19)

  • Inference: “For behold, the Lord is coming out from his place to punish the inhabitants of the earth for their iniquity, and the earth will disclose the blood shed on it, and will no more cover its slain.” (26:21)

Isaiah 27, The Redemption of Israel
1. “In that day the Lord with his hard and great and strong sword will punish Leviathan the fleeing serpent, leviathan the twisting serpent, and he will slay the dragon that is in the sea.” (27:1)

  • Inference: “In days to come Jacob shall take root, Israel shall blossom and put forth shoots and fill the whole world with fruit.” (27:6)

2. In that day from the river Euphrates to the Brook of Egypt the Lord will thresh out the grain, and you will be gleaned one by one, O people of Israel. (27:12)

  • Inference: “And in that day a great trumpet will be blown, and those who were lost in the land of Assyria and those who were driven out to the land of Egypt will come and worship the Lord on the holy mountain at Jerusalem.” (27:13)

Isaiah 28, Judgment on Ephraim and Jerusalem
1. “Behold, the Lord has one who is mighty and strong; like a storm of hail, a destroying tempest, like a storm of mighty, overflowing waters, he casts down to the earth with his hand.” (28:2)

  • Inference: “The proud crown of the drunkards of Ephraim will be trodden underfoot . . .” (28:3)

2. “In that day the Lord of hosts will be a crown of glory, and a diadem of beauty, to the remnant of his people, and spirit of justice to him who sits in judgment, and strength to those who turn back the battle at the gate.” (28:5-6)

  • Inference: “Therefore hear the word of the Lord, you scoffers, who rule this people in Jerusalem!” (28:14)

3. “. . . therefore thus says the Lord God, ‘Behold, I am the one who has laid as a foundation in Zion, a stone, a tested stone, a precious cornerstone, of a sure foundation: Whoever believes will not be in haste.'” (28:16)

  • Inference: John 3:16

Isaiah 29, The Siege of Jerusalem
1. “Ah, Ariel, Ariel, the city where David encamped!” (29:1)

  • Inference: “And I will encamp against you all around, and will besiege you with towers and I will raise siege works against you. And You will be brought low; from the earth you shall speak, and from the dust your speech will be bowed down; your voice shall come from the ground like the voice of a ghost, and from the dust your speech shall whisper.” (29:3-4)

2. “And in an instant, suddenly, you will be visited by the Lord of hosts with thunder and with earthquake and great noise, with whirlwind and tempest, and the flame of a devouring fire.” (29:5-6)

  • Inference: “Shall the potter be regarded as the clay, that the thing made should say of its maker, ‘He did not make me.’; or the thing formed say of him who formed it, ‘He has no understanding’? (29:16)

Week #90; Wed, Sep 18: Isaiah 30–37

Week #90; Wed, Sep 18: Isaiah 30:1–37:38

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. It appears to be entirely possible to read the terms “The Lord” and “Angel of the Lord” as Jesus in the Old Testament.

  • Inference: See: www.gotquestions.org and search on the question, “Is Jesus in the Old Testament?”

2. In reading this prophet, I seem to find a pattern of good versus bad. By picking out the major points for reflection, I find that either a good or bad point is followed with the impact of taking one position or another as noted by the “inferences” within each chapter. Two Greek words help decompose the text: “kairos” and “chronos.” See: www.gotquestions.org and search on the question, “What is the meaning of the Greek word kairos?”

  • Inference: In seeking out the major points, it seems well to keep the Greek terms “kairos” and “chronos” in mind to reveal God’s macro view and the limited human micro view. Kairos portends past, present, and future views all at the same time (omnipotence) as only God can do. Chronos is limited to a step by step view that confines humans to the limits of our chronological clock.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Isaiah 30, Do Not Go Down to Egypt
1. “Ah, stubborn children,” declares the Lord, “who carry out a plan, but not mine, and who make an alliance, but not of my Spirit, that they may add sin to sin; who set out to go down to Egypt, without asking for my direction, to take refuge in the protection of Pharaoh and seek shelter in the shadow of Egypt!” (30:1-2)

  • Inference: “. . . everyone comes to shame through a people that cannot profit them, that brings neither help nor profit, but shame and disgrace.” (30:5)
  • Inference: “For they are a rebellious people, lying children, children unwilling to hear the instruction of the Lord; who say to the seers, ‘Do not see,’ and the prophets, ‘do not prophesy to us what is right; speak to us smooth things, prophesy illusions, leave the way, turn aside from the path, let us hear no more about the Holy One of Israel.'” (30:9-12)

2. “For thus said the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel, ‘In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength. But you were unwilling, and you said, ‘No! We will flee upon horses’; therefore you shall flee away; and, ‘We will ride upon swift steeds’; therefore your pursuers shall be swift.'” (30:15-16)

  • Inference: “Therefore the Lord waits to be gracious to you, and therefore he exalts himself to show mercy to you. For the Lord is a God of justice; blessed are all those who wait for him.” (30:18)

3. “For a people shall dwell in Zion, in Jerusalem; you shall weep no more. He will surely be gracious to you at the sound of your cry. As soon as he hears it, he answers you.” (30:19)

  • Inference: “And though the Lord give you the bread of adversity and the water of affliction, yet your Teacher will not hide himself anymore, but your eyes shall see your Teacher.” (30:20)
  • Inference: “And your ears shall hear a word behind you, saying, ‘This is the way, walk in it,’ when you turn to the right or when you turn to the left.” (30:21)
  • Inference: “Then you will defile your carved idols overlaid with silver and your gold-plated metal images, You will scatter them as unclean things. You will say to them, ‘Be gone.'” (30:22)

4. “The Assyrians will be terror-stricken at the voice of the Lord, when he strikes with his rod.” (30:31)

  • Inference: “And every stroke of the appointed staff that the Lord lays on them will be to the sound of tambourines and lyres. Battling with brandished arm, he will fight with them. For a burning place has long been prepared; indeed, for the king it is made ready, its pyre made deep and wide, with fire and wood in abundance; the breath of the Lord, like a stream of sulfur, kindles it.” (30:32-33)

Isaiah 31, Woe to Those Who Go Down to Egypt
1. “Woe to those who go down to Egypt for help and rely on horses, who trust in chariots because they are many and in horsemen because they are very strong, but do not look to the Holy One of Israel or consult the Lord!” (31:1)

  • Inference: “The Egyptians are man, and not God, and their horses are flesh, and not spirit.” (31:3)
  • Inference: “When the Lord stretches out his hand, the helper will stumble, and he who is helped will fall, and they will all perish together.” (31:3)
  • Inference: “. . . so the Lord of hosts will come down to fight on Mount Zion and on its hill. Like birds hovering, so the Lord of hosts will protect Jerusalem; he will protect and deliver it; he will spare and rescue it.” (31:4-5)

2. “Turn to him from whom people have deeply revolted, O children of Israel. For in that day everyone shall cast away his idols of silver and his idols of gold, which your hands have sinfully made for you.” (31:6-9)

  • Inference: “And the Assyrian shall fall by a sword, not of man; and a sword, not of man, shall devour him; and he shall flee from the sword, and his young men shall be put to forced labor.” (31:8)

Isaiah 32, A King Will Reign in Righteousness
1. “Behold, a king will reign in righteousness, and princes will rule in justice.” (32:1)

  • Inference: “Each will be like a hiding place from the wind, a shelter from the storm, like streams of water in a dry place, like the shade of a great rock in a weary land.” (32:2)

2. “As for the scoundrel–his devices are evil; he plans wicked schemes to ruin the poor with lying words, even when the plea of the needy is right.” (32:7)

  • Inference: “But he who is noble plans noble things, and on noble things he stands.” (32:8)

3. “Rise up, you women who are at ease, hear my voice; you complacent daughters, give ear to my speech.” (32:9)

  • Inference: “For the palace is forsaken, the populous city deserted; the hill and the watchtower will become dens forever, a joy of wild donkeys, a pasture of flocks; until the Spirit is poured upon us from on high, and the wilderness becomes a fruitful field, and the fruitful field is deemed a forest.” (32:14-15)
  • Inference: “Then justice will dwell in the wilderness, and righteousness abide in the fruitful field. And the effect of righteousness will be peace, and the rest of righteousness, quietness and trust forever.” (32:16-17)
  • Inference: “My people will abide in a peaceful habitation, in secure dwellings, and in quiet resting places.” (32:18)

Isaiah 33, O Lord, Be Gracious to Us
1. “Ah, you destroyer, who yourself have not been destroyed, you traitor, whom none has betrayed! When you have ceased to destroy, you will be destroyed; and when you have finished betraying, they will betray you.” (33:1)

  • Inference: “O Lord, be gracious to us; we wait for you. Be our arm every morning, our salvation in time of trouble.” (33:2)
  • Inference: “The Lord is exalted, for he dwells on high; he will fill Zion with justice and righteousness, and he will be the stability of your times, abundance of salvation, wisdom, and knowledge; the fear of the Lord is Zion’s treasure.” (33:5-6)
  • Inference: “‘Now I will arise,” says the Lord, ‘now I will lift myself up; now I will be exalted.'” (33:10)
  • Inference: “Your eyes will behold the king in his beauty; they will see a land that stretches afar.” (33:17)
  • Inference; “Behold Zion, the city of our appointed feasts! Your eyes will see Jerusalem, an untroubled habitation, an immovable tent, whose stakes will never be plucked up, nor will any of its cords be broken.” (33:20)

Isaiah 34, Judgment on the Nations
1. “Draw near, O nations, to hear, and give attention, O peoples! Let the earth hear, and all that fills it; the world, and all that comes from it. For the Lord is enraged against all the nations, and furious against all their host; he has devoted them to destruction, has given them over for slaughter. Their slain shall be cast out, and the stench of the corpses shall rise; the mountains shall flow with their blood.” (34:1-3)

  • Inference: “For the Lord has a day of vengeance, a war of recompense for the cause of Zion. (34:8)
  • Inference: “Seek and read from the book of the Lord . . .” (34:16)

Isaiah 35, The Ransomed Shall Return
1. “Say to those who have an anxious heart, ‘Be strong; fear not! Behold, your God will come with vengeance, with the recompense of God. He will come and save you.'” (35:4)

  • Inference: “Then the eyes of the blind shall be opened, and the ears of the deaf unstopped; then shall the lame man leap like a deer, and the tongue of the mute sing for joy.” (35:5-6)
  • Inference: “And the ransomed of the Lord shall return and come to Zion with singing; everlasting joy shall be upon their heads; they shall obtain gladness and joy, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.” (35:10)

Isaiah 36, Sennacherib Invades Judah
1. “In the fourteenth year of King Hezekiah, Sennacherib king of Assyria came up against all the fortified cities of Judah and took them. And the king of Assyria sent the Rabshakeh (a high ranking Assyrian military officer) from Lachish to King Hezekiah at Jerusalem, with a great army.” (36:1-3)

  • Inference: After hearing the demands of the Assyrian officer, “Then Eliakim the son of Hilkiah, who was over the household, and Shebna the secretary, and Joah the son of Asaph, the recorder, came to Hezekiah with their clothes torn, and told him the words of the Rabshakeh.” (36:22)

Isaiah 37, Hezekiah Seeks Isaiah’s Help
1. “As soon as King Hezekiah heard it, he tore his clothes and covered himself with sackcloth and went into the house of the Lord.” (37:1)

  • Inference: Hezekiah sent word to Isaiah asking him to “. . . pray for the remnant that is left.” (37:4)

2. “When the servants of King Hezekiah came to Isaiah, Isaiah said to them, ‘Say to your master, Thus says the Lord: Do not be afraid because of the words that you have heard, with which the young men of the king of Assyria have reviled me. Behold, I will put a spirit in him, so that he shall hear a rumor and return to his own land, and I will make him fall by the sword in his own land.'” (37:5)

  • Inference: “The Rabshakeh returned, and found the king of Assyria fighting against Libnah, for he had heard that the king had left Lachish.” (37:8)
  • Inference: It appears that the Rabshakeh sent more mockings to Hezekiah and when they were received, Hezekiah returned to the house of the Lord and lifted up his own prayers saying, “O Lord of hosts, God of Israel, enthroned above the cherubim, you are the God, you alone, of all the kingdoms of the earth; you have made heavens and earth. Incline your ear, O Lord, and hear; open your eyes, O Lord, and see; and hear all the words of Sennacherib, which he has sent to mock the living God. Truly, O Lord, the kings of Assyria have laid waste all the nations and their lands, and have cast their gods into the fire. For they were no gods, but the work of men’s hands, wood and stone. Therefore they were destroyed. So now, O Lord our God, save us from his hand, that all the kingdoms of earth know that you alone are the Lord.” (37:16-20)

3. “Then Isaiah the son of Amoz sent to Hezekiah, saying, ‘Thus says the Lord, the God Israel: Because you have prayed to me concerning Sennacherib king of Assyria, this is the word that the Lord has spoken concerning him . . . I will put my hook in your nose and bit in your mouth, and I will turn you back on the way by which you came.'” (37:21-22, 29)

  • Inference: “And the surviving remnant of the house of Judah shall again take root downward and bear fruit upward. For out of Jerusalem shall go a remnant, and out of Mount Zion a band of survivors. The zeal of the Lord of hosts will do this.” (37:31-32)
  • Inference: “Therefore thus says the Lord concerning the king of Assyria: He shall not come into this city or shoot an arrow there or come before it with a shield or cast up a siege mound against it. By the way that he came, by the same he shall return, and he shall not come into this city, declares the Lord. For I will defend this site to save it, for my own sake and for the sake of my servant David.” (37:33-35)

4. “And the angel of the Lord went out and struck down a hundred and eighty-five thousand in the camp of the Assyrians. And when people arose early in the morning, behold, these were all dead bodies.” (37:36)

  • Inference: “Then Sennacherib king of Assyria departed and returned home and lived at Nineveh. And as he was worshiping in the house of Nisroch his god, Adrammeleh and Sharezer, his sons, stuck him down with the sword.” (37:37-38)

Week #91; Wed, Sep 25: Isaiah 38–44

Week #91; Wed, Sep 25: Isaiah 38:1-44:28

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. This posting completes the 3rd quarter for 2019, only five more quarters to go to complete this 3-Year study of the ESV.

  • Inference: God’s word is one book. By this point in a complete Bible reading, it is hard to miss how the prophets point to Jesus who is anchored in all of the Old Testament. Isaiah 40-44 pertains to these connections.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Isaiah 38, Hezekiah’s Sickness and Recovery
1. King Hezekiah became sick (a boil per 38:21) and was at the point of death and Isaiah, the prophet, came to him. (38:1; 2 Chron. 32:24-33)

  • Inference: When Isaiah came to Hezekiah, he  said, “Thus says the Lord; Set your house in order, for you shall die, you shall not recover.” (38:1)
  • Inference: Then Hezekiah turned to the wall and prayed, “Please, O Lord, remember how I have walked before you in faithfulness and with a whole heart, and have done what is good in your sight.” (38:2-3)
  • Inference: “And Hezekiah wept bitterly.” (38:3)

2. “Then the word of the Lord came to Isaiah: ‘Go and say to Hezekiah, Thus says the Lord, the God of David your father: I have heard your prayer; I have seen your tears. Behold, I will add fifteen years to your life. I will deliver you and this city out of the hand of the the king of Assyria, and will defend this city.” (38:4-6)

  • Inference: “This shall be the sign to you from the Lord, that the Lord will do this thing that he has promised: ‘Behold, I will make the shadow cast by the declining sun on the dial of Ahaz turn back ten steps.'” (38:7-8)

3. After King Hezekiah recovered, he wrote a lengthy lament moaning of oppression and bitterness as his extended life nears an end. He also lifts up heartfelt thanksgiving for his salvation. (38:9-20)

  • Inference: “Now Isaiah had said, ‘Let them take a cake of figs and apply it to the boil, that he may recover.'” (38:21, 2 Kings 20:7)
  • Inference: “Hezekiah also had said, ‘What is the sign that I shall go up to the house of the Lord?'” (38:22, 2 Kings 20:8)

Isaiah 39, Envoys from Babylon
1. “At that time Merodach-baladan the son of Baladan, king of Babylon, sent envoys with letters and a present to Hezekiah, for he heard that he had been sick and had recovered. And Hezekiah welcomed them gladly. And he showed them his treasure house, the silver, the gold, the spices, the precious oil, his whole armory, all that was found in his storehouses. There was nothing in his house or in all his realm that Hezekiah did not show them.” (39:1-2, 2 Kings 20:12-19)

  • Inference: “Then Isaiah the prophet came to King Hezekiah, and said to him, ‘What did these men say? And from where did they come to you?’ Hezekiah said, ‘They have come to me from a far country, from Babylon.’ He said, ‘What have they seen in your house?’ Hezekiah answered, ‘They have seen all that is in my house. There is nothing in my storehouses that I did not show them.'” (39:3-4)

2. “Then Isaiah said to Hezkiah, ‘Hear the word of the Lord of hosts: Behold, the days are coming, when all that is in your house, and that which your fathers have stored up till this day, shall be carried to Babylon. Nothing shall be left, says the Lord. And some of your own sons, who will come from you, whom you will father, shall be taken away, and they shall be eunuchs in the palace of the king of Babylon.'” (39:5-7)

  • Inference: “Then said Hezekiah to Isaiah, ‘The word of the Lord that you have spoken is good.’ For he thought, “There will be peace and security in my days.'” (39:8)

Isaiah 40, Comfort for God’s People
1. “Comfort, comfort my people, says your God. Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and cry to her that her welfare is ended, that her iniquity is pardoned, that she has received from the Lord’s hand double for all her sins.” (40:1-2)

  • Inference: “A voice cries: In the wilderness prepare the way of the Lord; make straight in the desert a highway for our God. Every valley shall be lifted up, and every mountain and hill be made low; the uneven ground shall become level, and the rough places a plain. And the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together, for the mouth of the Lord has spoken.” (40:3-5)

2. “A voice says, ‘Cry!’ And I said, ‘What shall I cry?’ All flesh is grass, and all its beauty is like the flower of the field. The grass withers, the flower fades when the breath of the Lord blows on it; surely the people are grass. The grass withers, the flower fades, but the word of our God will stand forever.” (40:6-8)

  • Inference: “Behold, the Lord God comes with might, and his arm rules for him; behold, his reward is with him, and his recompense before him. He will tend his flock like a shepherd; he will gather the lambs in his arms; he will carry them in his bosom, and gently lead those that are with young.” (40:10-11, Rev. 22:12) [Jesus can be seen here]

3. Do you not know? Do you not hear? Has it not been told you from the beginning? Have you not understood from the foundations of the earth? It is he who sits above the circle of the earth, and its inhabitants are like grasshoppers; who stretches out the heavens like a curtain, and spreads them like a tent to dwell in; who brings princes to nothing, and makes the rulers of the earth as emptiness.” (40:21-23)

  • Inference: “Have you not known? Have you not heard? The Lord is the everlasting God, the Creator of the ends of the earth. He does not faint or grow weary; his understanding is unsearchable. (40:28)
  • Inference: “He gives power to the faint, and to him who has no might he increases strength. Even youths shall faint and be weary, and young men shall fall exhausted; but they who wait for the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings like eagles; they shall run and not be weary; they shall walk and not faint. (40:29-31)

Isaiah 41, Fear Not, For I Am with You
1. “Who stirred up one from the east whom victory meets at every step? He gives up nations before him, so that he tramples kings underfoot; he makes them like dust with his sword, like driven stubble with his bow. He pursues them and passes on safely, by paths his feet have not trod. Who has performed and done this, calling the generations from the beginning? (41:2-4)

  • Inference: “I, the Lord, the first, and with the last; I am he.” (41:4)

2. “But you, Israel, my servant, Jacob, whom I have chosen, the offspring of Abraham, my friend; you whom I took from the ends of the earth, and called from its farthest corners, saying to you, ‘You are my servant, I have chosen you and not cast you off’; fear not, for I am with you; be not dismayed, for I am your God; I will strengthen you, I will help you, I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.” (41:8-10)

  • Inference: “Behold, all who are incensed against you shall be put to shame and confounded; those who strive against you shall be as nothing and shall perish.” (41:11)

3. Regarding the futility of idols, “Set forth your case, says the Lord; bring your proofs, says the King of Jacob. Let them bring them, and tell us what is to happen.” (41:21-22)

  • Inference: “Behold, you are nothing, and your work is less than nothing; an abomination is he who chooses you.” (41:24)
  • Inference: “Behold, they are all a delusion; their works are nothing; their metal images are empty wind.” (41:29)

Isaiah 42, The Lord’s Chosen Servant
1. “Behold my servant, whom I uphold, my chosen, in whom my soul delights; I have put my Spirit upon him; he will bring forth justice to the nations. He will not cry aloud or lift up his voice, or make it heard in the street; a bruised reed he will not break, and a faintly burning wick he will not quench; he will faithfully bring forth justice. He will not grow faint or be discouraged till he has established justice in the earth; and the coastlands wait for his law.” (42:1-4) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “I am the Lord; I have called you in righteousness; I will take you by the hand and keep you; I will give you as a covenant for the people, a light for the nations, to open the eyes that are blind, to bring out the prisoners from the dungeon, from the prison those who sit in darkness.” (42:8-9)

2. “Sing to the Lord a new song, his praise from the end of the earth, you who go down to the sea, and all that fills it, the coastlands and their inhabitants.” (42:10)

  • Inference: “And I will lead the blind in a way that they do not know, in paths that they have not known I will guide them.” (42:16
  • Inference: “They are turned back and utterly put to shame, who trust in carved idols, who say to metal images, ‘You are our gods.'” (42:-1)

3. “Who among you will give ear to this, will attend and listen for the time to come? (42:23)

  • Inference: “Who gave up Jacob to the looter, and Israel to the plunderers? Was it not the Lord, against whom we have sinned, in whose ways they would not walk, and whose law they would not obey?” (42:24)

Isaiah 43, Israel’s Only Savior
1. “But now thus says the Lord, he who created you, O Jacob, he who formed you, O Israel: Fear not, for I have redeemed you; I have called you by name, you are mine. When you pass through the waters, I will be with you; and through the rivers, they shall not overwhelm you; when you walk through fire you shall not be burned, and the flame shall not consume you.” (43:1-3)

  • Inference: “For I am the Lord your God, the Holy one of Israel, your Savior.” (43:3)

2. “Because you are precious in my eyes, and honored, and I love you, I give men in return for you, peoples in exchange for your life.” (43:4)

  • Inference: “Fear not, for I am with you, peoples in exchange for your life. Fear not, for I am with you; I will bring your offspring from the east, and from the west I will gather you.” (43:5)

3. “‘You are my witnesses,’ declares the Lord, ‘and my servant whom I have chosen, that you may know and believe me and understand that I am he.’ Before me no god was formed, nor shall there be any after me. I, I am the Lord, and besides me there is o savior.” (43:10) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “I am the Lord, your Holy  One, the Creator of Israel, your King.” (43:15)

4. “Behold, I am doing a new thing; now it springs forth, do you not perceive it?” (43:19)

  • Inference: “I will make a way in the wilderness and rivers in the desert. The wild beasts will honor me, the jackals and the ostriches, for I give water in the wilderness, rivers in the desert, to give drink to my chosen people, the people whom I formed for myself that they might declare my praise.” (43:19-21)

5. “I, I am he who blots out your transgressions for my own sake, and I will not remember your sins.” (43:25)

  • Inference: “Your first father sinned, and you mediators transgressed against me. Therefore I will profane the princes of the sanctuary, and deliver Jacob to utter destruction and Israel to reviling.” (43:27-28)

Isaiah 44, Israel the Lord’s Chosen
1. “But now hear, O Jacob my servant, Israel whom I have chosen! Thus says the Lord who made you, who formed you from the womb and will help you: Fear not, O Jacob my servant, Jeshurun whom I have chosen.” (44:1-2)

  • Inference: “For I will pour water on the thirsty land, and streams on the dry ground; I will pour my Spirit upon your offspring, and my blessing on your descendants.” (44:3)

2. “Thus says the Lord, the King of Israel and his Redeemer, the Lord of hosts: I am the first and I am the last; besides me there is no god. Who is like me? Let him proclaim it. Let him declare and set it before me, since I appointed an ancient people. Let them declare what is to come, and what will happen.” (44:6-8) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “Fear not, nor be afraid; have I not told you from of old and declared it? And you are my witnesses! Is there a God besides me? There is no Rock; I know not any.” (44:8)

3. “All who fashion idols are nothing, and the things they delight in do not profit.” (44:9)

  • Inference: “Their witnesses neither see nor know, that they may be put to shame.” (44:9)

4. “Remember these things, O Jacob, and Israel, for you are my servant; I formed you; you are my servant; O Israel, you will not be forgotten by me. I have blotted out your transgressions like a cloud and your sins like mist; return to me, for I have redeemed you.” (44:21-22)

  • Inference: “Sing, O heavens, for the Lord has done it; shout, O depths of the earth; break forth into singing, O mountains, O forest, and every tree in it! For the Lord has redeemed Jacob, and will be glorified in Israel.” (44:23)

Week #92; Wed, Oct 02: Isaiah 45-53

Week #92; Wed, Oct 02: Isaiah 45:1-53:12

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. God uses all people, both good and bad, as instruments to bring about his will and accomplish his master plan.

  • Inference: “I call you by your name, I name you, though you do not know me.” (45:3-4)

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Isaiah 45, Cyrus, God’s Instrument
1. “Thus says the Lord to his anointed, to Cyrus, whose right hand I have grasped to subdue nations before him and to loose the belts of kings, to open doors before him that gates may not be closed: I will go before you and level the exalted places, I will break in pieces the doors of bronze and cut through bars of iron, I will give you the treasures of darkness and the hoards in secret places, that you may know that it is I, the Lord, the God of Israel who call you by your name.” (45:1-3)

  • Inference: “For the sake of my servant Jacob, and Israel my chosen, I call you by your name, I name you, though you do not know me.” (45:4)
  • Inference: “I am the Lord, and there is no other, besides me there is no God; I equip you, though you do not know me, that people may know, form the rising of the sun and from the west, that there is none besides me; I am the Lord, and there is no other.” (45:5-6)

2. Regarding Cyrus, “‘I have stirred him up in righteousness, and I will make all his ways level; he shall build my city and set my exiles free, not for price or reward,’ says the Lord of hosts.” (45:13)

  • Inference: “. . . who says of Cyrus, ‘He is my shepherd, and he shall fulfill all my purpose’; saying of Jerusalem, ‘She shall be built,’ and of the temple, ‘Your foundation shall be laid.'” (44:28)

3. “Turn to me and be saved, all the ends of the earth! For I am God, and there is no other. By myself I have sworn; from my mouth has gone out in righteousness a word that shall not return: ‘To me every knee shall bow, every tongue shall swear allegiance.'” (45:22-23)

  • Inference: “In the Lord all the offspring of Israel shall be justified and shall glory.” (45:25)

Isaiah 46, The Idols of Babylon and the One True God
1. “Those who lavish gold from the purse, and weigh out silver in the scales, hire a goldsmith, and he makes it into a god; then they fall down and worship! They lift it to their shoulders, they carry it, they set it in its place, and it stands there; it cannot move from its place.” (46:6-7)

  • Inference: “If one cries to it, it does not answer or save him from his trouble.” (46:7)

2. “Listen to me, you stubborn of heart, you who are far from righteousness: I bring near my righteousness; it is not far off, and my salvation will not delay; I will put salvation in Zion, for Israel my glory.” (46:13)

  • Inference: It appears that Cyrus does not know he is an instrument of the Lord, but he is a critical cog in the Lord’s plan for Israel, Jerusalem, and Zion.

Isaiah 47, The Humiliation of Babylon
1. “You (Babylon) felt secure in your wickedness, you said, ‘No one sees me” your wisdom and your knowledge led you astray, and you said in your heart, ‘I am, and there is no one besides me.'” (47:10)

  • Inference: “But evil shall come upon you, which you will not know how to charm away; disaster shall fall upon you, for which you will not be able to atone; and ruin shall come upon you suddenly, of which you know nothing.” (47:11)

Isaiah 48, Israel Refined for God’s Glory
1. “Behold, I have refined you, but not as silver; I have tried you in the furnace of affliction.” (48:10, 1 Pet. 1:7)

  • Inference: “For my own sake, for my own sake, I do it, for how should my name be profaned? My glory I will not give to another.” (48:11)
  • Inference: “Listen to me, O Jacob, and Israel, whom I called! I am he; I am the first, and I am the last. My hand laid the foundation of the earth, and my right hand spread out the heavens; when I call to them, they stand forth together.” (48:13)

2. Pertaining to the Lord’s call to Israel, “Assemble, all of you, and listen! Who among them has declared these things? The Lord loves him; he shall perform his purpose on Babylon, and his arm shall be against the Chaldeans. I, even I, have spoken and called him; I have brought him, and he will prosper in his way. Draw near to me, hear this: from the beginning I have not spoken in secret, from the time it came to be I have been there. And now the Lord God has sent me, and his Spirit. Thus says the Lord, your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel: ‘I am the Lord your God, who teaches you to profit, who leads you in the way you should go. . . .'” (48:14-17, 61:1-4, Luke 4:18, 19, Ps. 45:7, Ps. 146:7) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “Oh that you had paid attention to my commandments! Then your peace would have been like a river, and your righteousness like the waves of the sea; your offspring would have been like the sand, and your descendants like its grains; their name would never be cut off or destroyed from before me.” (48:18)

Isaiah 49, The Servant of the Lord
1. And now the Lord says, he who formed me from the womb to be his servant, to bring Jacob back to him; and that Israel might be gathered to him–for I am honored in the eyes of the Lord, and my God has become my strength.” (49:5)

  • Inference: “It is too light a thing that you should be my servant to raise up the tribes of Jacob and to bring back the preserved of Israel; I will make you as a light for the nations, that my salvation may reach to the end of the earth.” (49:6) [Jesus can be seen here]

2. “Thus says the Lord God: ‘Behold, I will lift up my hand to the nations, and raise my signal to the peoples; and they shall bring your sons in their bosom, and your daughters shall be carried on their shoulders.'” (49:22) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “Then you will know that I am the Lord; those who wait for me shall not be put to shame.” (49:23, 26)

Isaiah 50, Israel’s Sin and the Servant’s Obedience
1. “Behold, for your iniquities you were sold, and for your transgressions your mother was sent away.” (50:1)

  • Inference: “Who among you fears the Lord and obeys the voice of his servant? Let him who walks in darkness and has no light trust in the name of the Lord and rely on his God.” (50:10)

Isaiah 51, The Lord’s Comfort for Zion
1. “Look to Abraham your father and to Sarah who bore you; for he was but one when I called him, that I might bless him and multiply him.” (51:2)

  • Inference: “For the Lord comforts Zion; he comforts all her waste places and makes her wilderness like Eden, her desert like the garden of the Lord; joy and gladness will be found in her, thanksgiving and the voice of song” (51:3)
  • Inference: “Lift up your eyes to the heavens, and look at the earth beneath; for the heavens vanish like smoke, the earth will wear out like a garment, and they who dwell in it will die in like manner; but my salvation will be forever, and my righteousness will never be dismayed.” (51:6)
  • Inference: “And the ransomed of the Lord shall return and come to Zion with singing; everlasting joy shall be upon their heads; they shall obtain gladness and joy, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.” (51:11)

Isaiah 52, The Lord’s Coming Salvation
1. “Awake, awake, put on your strength, O Zion; put on your beautiful garments, O Jerusalem, the holy city; for there shall no more come into you the uncircumcised and the unclean. Shake yourself from the dust and arise; be seated, O Jerusalem; loose the bonds from your neck, O captive daughter of Zion.” (52:1-2)

  • Inference: “Behold, my servant shall act wisely; he shall be high and lifted up, and shall be exalted. As many were astonished at you–his appearance was so marred, beyond human semblance, and his form beyond that of the children of mankind–so shall he sprinkle (or startle) many nations; kings shall shut their mouths because of him; for that which has not been told them they see, and that which they have not heard they understand.” (52:13-15) [Jesus can be seen here]

Isaiah 53, He Was Wounded for Our Transgressions (cont. from ch. 52 above)
1. “He was despised and rejected by men; a man of sorrows and acquainted with grief; and as one from whom men hide their faces he was despised, and we esteemed him not.” (53:3) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “Surely he has borne our griefs and carried our sorrows; yet we esteemed him stricken, smitten by God, and afflicted.” (53:4) [Jesus can be seen here]
  • Inference: “But he was wounded for our transgressions; he was crushed for our iniquities; upon him was the chastisement that brought us peace, and with his stripes we are healed. All we like sheep have gone astray; we have turned–every one–to his own way; and the Lord has laid on him the iniquity of us all.” (53:5-6) [Jesus can be seen here]
  • Inference: “He was oppressed, and he was afflicted, yet he opened not his mouth; like a lamb that is led to the slaughter, and like a sheep that before its shearers is silent, so he opened not his mouth.” (53:7) [Jesus can be seen here]

2. “Yet, it was the will of the Lord to crush him; he has put him to grief; when his soul makes an offering for guilt, he shall see his offspring; he shall prolong his days; the will of the Lord shall prosper in his hand.” (53:10) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “Therefore I will divide him a portion with the many, and he shall divide the spoil with the strong, because he poured out his soul to death and was numbered with the transgressors; yet he bore the sin of many, and makes intercession for the transgressors. (53:12) [Jesus can be seen here]

Week #93; Wed, Oct 09: Isaiah 54-62

Week #93; Wed, Oct 02: Isaiah 54:1-62:12

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. Bible timelines that set out chronological events provide improved understanding, particularly during the period of the fall and rise of the northern and southern kingdoms of Israel.

  • Inference: The Rose Book of Bible Charts, Maps and Time Lines, 10th Expanded Anniversary Edition reveals connections between the prophets and the fall to the Assyrians, Babylonians, and Persians.
  • Inference: The World History Chart in Accordance with Bible Chronology, by Bible Charts and Maps, LLC, depicts activity in other parts of the world at the same time as the events in the Bible (i.e., China, Japan, Greece, Rome, India, Euro-Germanic tribes, Persia, etc.).

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Isaiah 54, The Eternal Covenant of Peace
1. “For your maker is your husband, the Lord of hosts is his name; and the Holy One of Israel is your Redeemer, the God of the whole earth he is called.” (54:5)

  • Inference: “For the Lord has called you like a wife deserted and grieved in spirit like a wife of youth when she is cast off, says your God. For a brief moment I deserted you, but with great compassion I will gather you.” (54:6-7)
  • Inference: “This is like the days of Noah to me: as I swore that the waters of Noah should no more go over the earth, so I have sworn that I will not be angry with you, and will not rebuke you.” (54;9)
  • Inference: “For the mountains may depart and the hills be removed, but my steadfast love shall not depart from you, and my covenant of peace shall not be removed, says the Lord, who has compassion on you.” (54:10)
  • Inference: “And the Lord said to Moses, ‘Phinehas the son of Eleazar, son of Aaron the priest, has turned back my wrath from the people of Israel, in that he was jealous with my jealousy among them, so that I did not consume the people of Israel in my jealousy. Therefore say, ‘Behold, I give to him my covenant of peace, and it shall be to him and to his descendants after him the covenant of a perpetual priesthood, because he was jealous for his God and made atonement for the people of Israel'” (Num. 25:12)

Isaiah 55, The Compassion of the Lord
1. “Come, everyone who thirsts, come to the waters; and he who has no money, come, buy and eat! Come, buy wine and milk without money and without price.” (55:1)

  • Inference: “For the heavens are higher than the earth, so are my ways higher than your ways and my thoughts than your thoughts.” (55:9)

Isaiah 56, Salvation for Foreigners
1. “Thus says the Lord: ‘Keep justice, and do righteousness, for soon my salvation will come, and my deliverance be revealed.” (56:1)

  • Inference: “Blessed is the man who does this, and the son of man who holds it fast, who keeps the Sabbath, not profaning it, an keeps his hand from doing any evil” (56:2)

2. “Let not the foreigner who has joined himself to the Lord say, ‘The Lord will surely separate me from his people’, and let not the eunuch say, ‘Behold, I am a dry tree.'” (56:3)

  • Inference: “. . . these I will bring to my holy mountain, and make them joyful in my house of prayer; their burnt offerings and their sacrifices will be accepted on my altar; for my house shall be called a house of prayer for all peoples.” (56:7)

Isaiah 57, Israel’s Futile Idolatry
1. “But you, draw near, sons of the sorceress, offspring of the adulterer and the loose woman.” (57:1)

  • Inference: “On a high and lofty mountain you have set your bed, and there you went up to offer sacrifice. Behind the door and the doorpost you have set up your memorial [idol]; for, deserting me, you have uncovered your bed, you have gone up to it, you have made it wide; and you have made a covenant for yourself with them, you have loved their bed, you have looked on nakedness.” (57:7-8)

2. “For thus says the One who is high and lifted up, who inhabits eternity, whose name is Holy: ‘I dwell in the high and holy place, and also with him who is of a contrite and lowly spirit, to revive the spirit of the lowly, and to revive the heart of the contrite.'” (57:15)

  • Inference: “I have seen his ways, but I will heal him; I will lead him and restore comfort to him and his mourners, creating the fruit of the lips. Peace, peace, to the far and to the near, says the Lord, and I will heal him.” (57:18-19)

Isaiah 58, True and False Fasting
1. “Cry aloud; do not hold back; lift up your voice like a trumpet; declare to my people their transgression, to the house of Jacob their sins. Yet they seek me daily and delight to know my ways, as if they were a nation that did righteousness and did not forsake the judgment of their God; they ask of me righteous judgments; they delight to draw near to God.” (58:1-2)

  • Inference: “Why have we fasted, and you see it not? Why have we humbled ourselves, and you take no knowledge of it? Behold, in the day of your fast you seek your own pleasure, and oppress all your workers. Behold, you fast only to quarrel and to fight and to hit with wicked fist. Fasting like yours this day will not make your voice to be heard on high.” (58:3-4)
  • Inference: “Is not this the fast that I choose: to loose the bonds of wickedness, to undo the straps of the yoke, to let the oppressed go free, and to break every yoke? Is it not to share your bread with the hungry and bring the homeless poor into your house; when you see the naked, to cover him, and not to hide yourself from your own flesh? Then shall your light break forth like the dawn, and your healing shall spring up speedily; your righteousness shall go before you; the glory of the Lord shall be your rear guard, Then you shall call, and the Lord will answer; you shall cry, and he will say, ‘Here I am.'” (58:6-9)

Isaiah 59, Evil and Oppression
1. “Behold, the Lord’s hand is not shortened, that it cannot save, or his ear dull, that it cannot hear; but our iniquities have made a separation between you and your God, and your sins have hidden his face from you so that he does not hear.” (59:1-2)

  • Inference: “For your hands are defiled with blood and your fingers with iniquity; your lips have spoken lies; your tongue mutters wickedness.” (59:3)

2. “The Lord saw it, and it displeased him that there was no justice.” (59:1)

  • Inference: “He put on righteousness as a breastplate, and a helmet of salvation on his head; he put on garments of vengeance for clothing, and wrapped himself in zeal as a cloak.” (59:17, 1 Thess. 5:8)
  • Inference: “So they shall fear the name of the Lord from the west, and his glory from the rising of the sun; for he will come like a rushing stream, which the wind of the Lord drives. ‘And a Redeemer will come to Zion, to those in Jacob who turn from transgression,’ declares the Lord.” (59:19-20, Rom. 11:26-27) [Jesus can be seen here]

Isaiah 60, The Future Glory of Israel

1. “Arise, shine, for your light has come, and the glory of the Lord has risen upon you. For behold, darkness shall cover the earth, and thick darkness the peoples; but the Lord will arise upon you, and his glory will be seen upon you.” (60:1-2) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “And nations shall come to your light, and kings to the brightness of your rising.” (60:3) [Jesus can be seen here]
  • Inference: “For the nation and kingdom that will not serve you shall perish; those nations shall be utterly laid waste.” (60:12, Zech. 14:17-20)

Isaiah 61, The Year of the Lord’s Favor
1. “The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me, because the Lord has anointed me to bring good news to the poor; he has sent me to bind up the broken-hearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to those who are bound; to proclaim the year of the Lord’s favor, and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all who mourn; to grant to those who mourn in Zion–to give them a beautiful headdress instead of ashes, the oil of gladness instead of mourning, the garment of praise instead of a faint spirit; that they may be called oaks of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that he may be glorified. They shall build up the ancient ruins; they shall raise up the former devastations; they shall repair the ruined cities, the devastations of many generations.” (61:1-4) [Jesus can be seen here]

  • Inference: “For as the earth brings forth its sprouts, and as a garden causes what is sown in it to sprout up, so the Lord God will cause righteousness and praise to sprout up before all the nations.” (61:11)

Isaiah 62, Zion’s Coming Salvation
1. For Zion’s sake I will not keep silent, and for Jerusalem’s sake I will not be quiet, until her righteousness goes forth as brightness, and her salvation as a burning torch.” (62:1)

  • Inference: “The nations shall see your righteousness, and all the kings your glory, and you shall be called by a new name that the mouth of the Lord will give. You shall be a crown of beauty in the hand of the Lord, and a royal diadem in the hand of your God.” (62:2-3)

Week #94; Wed, Oct 16: Isaiah 63–Jeremiah 3

Week #94; Wed, Oct 16: Isaiah 63:1–Jeremiah 3:25

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:
1. It is definitely worthwhile to read the related notes for a verse in the concordance that ties the prophecy to other prophecies and to similar topics in the Old and New Testament Scriptures. Use of Bible software on your PC or pad/tablet or phone eases searches and broadens depth of knowledge. See paragraph 1C at www.jwaministries.net for suggested software including a dramatized audio version.

  • Inference: Note how Isaiah 63:3 ties to Joel 3:13-16

2. Like earlier observation on Jesus in the Old Testament, here we see clearly where the Holy Spirit is named in the open in the Old Testament.

  • Inference: See Isaiah 63:10 and 11 for clear references to the Spirit of the Lord.

3. The relationship to Mount Zion in Jerusalem and the Kingdom of God and the New Jerusalem is worth deep contemplation. What a day that will be . . .

4. Please click https://jwaministries.net/wp for all archived postings.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Isaiah 63, The Lord’s Day of Vengeance
1. “I have trodden the winepress alone, and from the peoples no one was with me; I trod them in my anger and trampled them in my wrath; their lifeblood spattered on my garments, and stained all my apparel.” (63:3)

  • Inference: “For the day of vengeance was in my heart, and my year of redemption had come.” (63:4)
  • Inference: “Put in the sickle, for the harvest is ripe. Go in, tread, for the winepress is full. The vats overflow, for their evil is great. Multitudes, multitudes, in the valley of decision! For the day of the Lord is near in the valley of decision. The sun and the moon are darkened, and the stars withdraw their shining. The Lord roars from Zion, and utters his voice from Jerusalem, and the heavens and the earth quake. But the Lord is a refuge to his people, a stronghold to the people of Israel.” (Joel:13-16)

2. But, “I will recount the steadfast love of the Lord, the praises of the Lord, according to all that the Lord has granted us, and the great goodness to the house of Israel that he has granted them according to his compassion, according to the abundance of his steadfast love.” (63:7)

  • Inference: “For he said, ‘Surely they are my people, children who will not deal falsely.’ And he became their Savior.” (63:8)

3. “But they rebelled and grieved his Holy Spirit; therefore he turned to be their enemy, and himself fought against them.” (63:10)

  • Inference: “Then he remembered the days of old, of Moses and his people. Where is he who brought them up out of the sea with the shepherds of his flock? Where is he who put in the midst of them his Holy Spirit, who caused his glorious arm to go at the right hand of Moses, who divided the waters before them to make for himself an everlasting name, who led them through the depths?” (63:11-13)

4. Prayer for mercy. “Look down from heaven and see, from your holy and beautiful habitation. Where are your zeal and your might? The stirring of your inner parts and your compassion are held back from me. For you are our Father, though Abraham does not know us, and Israel does not acknowledge us; you, O Lord, are our Father, our Redeemer from of old is your name.” (63:15-16)

  • Inference: “O Lord, why do you make us wander from your ways and harden our heart, so that we fear you not? Return for the sake of your servants, the tribes of your heritage. Your holy people held possession for a little while; our adversaries have trampled down your sanctuary. We have become like those over whom you have never ruled, like those who are not called by your name.” (63:17-19)

Isaiah 64, The Lord’s Day of Vengeance (cont.)
1. “There is no one who calls upon your name, who rouses himself to take hold of you; for you have hidden your face from us, and have made us melt in the hand of our iniquities.” (64:7)

  • Inference: “But now, O Lord, your are our Father; we are the clay, and you are our potter; we are all the work of your hand. Be not so terribly angry, O Lord, and remember not iniquity forever. Behold, please look, we are all your people.” (64:8-9)

2. “Your holy cities have become a wilderness; Zion has become a wilderness, Jerusalem a desolation. Our holy and beautiful house, where our fathers praised you, has been burned by fire, and all our pleasant places have become ruins.” (64:10-11)

  • Inference: “Will you restrain yourself at these things, O Lord? Will you keep silent, and afflict us so terribly?” (64:12)

Isaiah 65, Judgment and Salvation and New Heavens and a New Earth
1. “I was ready to be sought by those who did not ask for me; I was ready to be found by those who did not seek me. I said, ‘Here am I, here am I,’ to a nation that was not called by my name. I spread out my hands all the day to a rebellious people, who walk in a way that is not good, following their own devices; a people who provoke me to my face continually, sacrificing in gardens and making offerings on bricks; who sit in tombs, and spend the night in secret places; who eat pig’s flesh, and broth of tainted meat is in their vessels; who say, ‘Keep to yourself, do not come near me, for I am too holy for you.'” (65:1-5)

  • Inference: “These are a smoke in my nostrils, a fire that burns all the day.” (65:5)
  • Inference: “Behold, it is written before me: ‘I will not keep silent, but I will repay; I will indeed repay into their bosom both your iniquities and your fathers’ iniquities together, says the Lord; because they made offerings on the mountains and insulted me on the hills, I will measure into their bosom payment for their former deeds.'” (65:6-7)

2. “I will bring forth offspring from Jacob, and from Judah possessors of my mountains; my chosen shall possess, and my servants shall dwell there. Sharon shall become a pasture for flocks, and the Valley of Achor a place for herds to lie down, for my people who have sought me. But you who forsake the Lord, who forget my holy mountain, who sat a table for Fortune and fill cups of mixed wine for Destiny, I will destine you to the sword, and all of you shall bow down to the slaughter, because, when I called, you did not answer; when I spoke, you did not listen, but you did what was evil in my eyes and chose what I did not delight in.” (65:9-12)

  • Inference: “Therefore thus says the Lord God: Behold, my servants shall eat, but you shall be hungry; behold, my servants shall drink, but you shall be thirsty; behold, my servants shall rejoice, but you shall be put to shame; behold, my servants shall sing for gladness of heart, but you shall cry out for pain of heart and shall wail for breaking of spirit. You shall leave your name to my chosen for a curse, and the Lord God will put you to death, but his servants he will call by another name.” (65:13-15)
  • Inference: “So that he who blesses himself in the land shall bless himself by the God of truth, and he who takes an oath in the land shall swear by the God of truth; because the former troubles are forgotten and are hidden from my eyes.” (65:16)

3. “For behold, I create new heavens and a new earth, and the former things shall not be remembered or come into mind. But be glad and rejoice forever in that which I create; for behold, I create Jerusalem to be a joy, and her people to be a gladness.” (65:17, 2 Peter 3:13, Rev. 21:1)

  • Inference: “I will rejoice in Jerusalem and be glad in my people; no more shall be heard in it the sound of weeping and the cry of distress. No more shall there be in it an infant who lives but a few days, or an old man who does not fill out his days, for the young man shall die a hundred years old, and the sinner a hundred years old shall be accursed.” (65:19-20)
  • Inference: “‘The wolf and the lamb shall graze together; the lion shall eat straw like the ox, and dust shall be the serpent’s food. They shall not hurt or destroy in all my holy mountain’, says the Lord.” (65:25, Mic. 7:17)

Isaiah 66, The Humble and Contrite in Spirit and Final Judgment and Glory of the Lord
1. “Thus says the Lord: ‘Heaven is my throne, and the earth is my footstool; what is the house that you would build for me, and what is the place of my rest? All these things my hand has made, and so all these things came to be, declares the Lord.'” (66:1-2)

  • Inference: “But this is the one to whom I will look: he who is humble and contrite in spirit and trembles at my word.” (66:2)
  • Inference: “I also will choose harsh treatment for them [evil doers] and bring their fears upon them, because when I called, no one answered, when I spoke, they did not listen; but they did what was evil in my eyes and chose that in which I did not delight.” (66:4)

2. “‘For behold, the Lord will come in fire, and his chariots like the whirlwind, to render his anger in fury, and his rebuke with flames of fire. For by fire will the Lord enter into judgment, and by his sword, with all flesh; and those slain by the Lord shall be many.” (66:15-16)

  • Inference: “And they shall go out and look on the dead bodies of the men who have rebelled against me. For their worm shall not die, and their fire shall not be quenched, and they shall be an abhorrence to all flesh.” (66:24, Mark 9:48, Rev. 21:8)

Jeremiah 1, The Call of Jeremiah (The Weeping Prophet)
1. “Now the word of the Lord came to me, saying, “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you; I appointed you a prophet to the nations.” (1:4-5)

  • Inference: “Then I said, ‘Ah, Lord God! Behold, I do not know how to speak, for I am only a youth.” (1:6)
  • Inference: “But the Lord said to me, ‘Do not say, I am only a youth’; for to all to whom I send you, you shall go, and whatever I command you, you shall speak. Do not be afraid of them, for I am with you to deliver you, declares the Lord.'” (1:7-8)

2. “Then the Lord put out his hand and touched my mouth. And the Lord said to me, ‘Behold, I have put my words in your mouth. See, I have set you this day over nations and over kingdoms, to pluck up and to break down, to destroy and to overthrow, to build and to plant.'” (1:9-10)

  • Inference: “And the word of the Lord came to me, saying, ‘Jeremiah, what do you see?’ And I said, ‘I see an almond branch.’ Then the Lord said to me, ‘You have seen well, for I am watching over my word to perform it.'” (1:11)
  • Inference: “The word of the Lord came to me a second time, saying, ‘What do you see?’ And I said, ‘I see a boiling pot, facing away from the north.’ Then the Lord said to me, ‘Out of the north disaster shall be let loose upon all the inhabitants of the land. For behold, I am calling all the tribes of the kingdoms of the north, declares the Lord, and they shall come, and every one shall set his throne at the entrance of the gates of Jerusalem, against all its walls all around and against all the cities of Judah. And I will declare my judgments against them, for all their evil in forsaking me. They have made offerings to other gods and worshiped the works of their own hands. But you, dress yourself for work; arise, and say to them everything that I command you. Do not be dismayed by them, lest I dismay you before them. And I, behold, I make you this day a fortified city, an iron pillar, and bronze walls, against the whole land, against the kings of Judah, its officials, its priests, and the people of the land. They will fight against you, but they shall not prevail against you, for I am with you, declares the Lord, to deliver you.'” (1:11-19)

Jeremiah 2, Israel Forsakes the Lord
1. “The word of the Lord came to me, saying, ‘Go and proclaim in the hearing of Jerusalem, Thus say the Lord, I remember the devotion of your youth, your love as a bride, how you followed me in the wilderness, in a land not sown. Israel was holy to the Lord, the first fruits of his harvest. All who ate of it incurred guilt; disaster came upon them, declares the Lord.'” (2:1-3)

  • Inference: “Hear the word of the Lord, O house of Jacob, and all the clans of the house of Israel. Thus says the Lord: ‘What wrong did your fathers find in me that they went far from me, and went after worthlessness, and became worthless? They did not say, ‘Where is the Lord who brought us up from the land of Egypt, who led us in the wilderness, in a land of deserts and pits, in a land of drought and deep darkness, in a land that none passes through, where no man dwells? And I brought you into a plentiful land to enjoy its fruits and its good things. But when you came in, you defiled my land and made my heritage an abomination.'” (2:4-7)

2. “The priests did not say, ‘Where is the Lord?’ Those who handle the law did not know me; the shepherds transgressed against me; the prophets prophesied by Baal and went after things that do not profit.” (2:8)

  • Inference: “Therefore I still contend with you, declares the Lord, and with your children’s children I will contend.” (2:9)

3. “Has a nation changed it’s gods, even though they are no gods? But my people have changed their glory for that which does not profit.” (2:11)

  • Inference: “Be  appalled, O heavens, at this; be shocked, be utterly desolate, declares the Lord, for my people have committed two evils: they have forsaken me, the fountain of living waters, and hewed out cisterns for themselves, broken cisterns that can hold no water.” (2:12-13)
  • Inference: “Your evil will chastise you, and your apostasy will reprove you. Know and see that it is evil and bitter for you to forsake the Lord your God; the fear of me is not in you, declares the Lord God of hosts.” (2:19)
  • Inference: “But in the time of their trouble they say, ‘Arise and save us!’ But where are your gods that you made for yourself? Let them arise, if they can save you, in your time of trouble; for as many as your cities are your gods, O Judah.” (2:27-28)
  • Inference: “Behold, I will bring you to judgment for saying, ‘I have not sinned.’ How much you go about, changing your way!” (2:35-36)

Jeremiah 3, Faithless Israel Called to Repentance

1. “If a man divorces his wife and she goes from him and becomes another man’s wife, will he return to her? Would not that land be greatly polluted? You have played the whore with many lovers; and would you return to me? declares the Lord.” (3:1)

  • Inference: “You have polluted the land with your vile whoredom. Therefore the showers have been withheld, and the spring rain has not come; yet you have the forehead of a whore; you refuse to be ashamed.” (3:2-3)

2. “The Lord said to me in the days of King Josiah: ‘Have you seen what she did, that faithless one, Israel, how she went up on every high hill and under every green tree, and there played the whore: And I thought, ‘After she has done all this she will return to me,’ but she did not return, and her treacherous sister Judah saw it. She saw that for all the adulteries of that faithless one, Israel, I had sent her away with a decree of divorce. Yet her treacherous sister Judah did not fear, but she too went and played the whore. Because she took her whoredom lightly, she polluted the land, committing adultery with stone and tree. Yet for all this her treacherous sister Judah did not return to me with her whole heart, but in pretense, declares the Lord.” (3:6-10)

  • Inference: “And the Lord said to me, ‘Faithless Israel has shown herself more righteous than treacherous Judah. Go, and proclaim these words toward the north, and say, ‘Return, faithless Israel, declares the Lord. I will not look on you in anger, for I am merciful, declares the Lord; I will not be angry forever. Only acknowledge your guilt, that you rebelled against the Lord your God and scattered your favors among foreigners under every green tree, and that you have not obeyed my voice, declares the Lord. Return, O faithless children, declares the Lord; for I am your master; I will take you, one from a city and two from a family, and I will bring you to Zion.” (3:11-14)

3. “And I will give you shepherds after my own heart, who will feed you with knowledge and understanding.” (3:15)

  • Inference: “And when you have multiplied and increased in the land, in those days, declares the Lord, they shall no more say, ‘The ark of the covenant of the Lord.’ It shall not come to mind or be remembered or missed; it shall not be made again. At that time Jerusalem shall be called the throne of the Lord, and all nations shall gather to it, to the presence of the Lord in Jerusalem, and they shall no more stubbornly follow their own evil heart. In those days the house of Judah shall join the house of Israel, and together they shall come from the land of the north to the land that I gave your fathers for a heritage.” (3:16-18)

4. “But from our youth the shameful thing has devoured all for which our fathers labored, their flocks and their herds, their sons and their daughters.” (3:24)

  • Inference: “Let us lie down in our shame, and let our dishonor cover us. For we have sinned against the Lord our God, we and our fathers, from our youth even to this day, and we have not obeyed the voice of the Lord our God.” (3:25)

Week #95; Wed, Oct 23: Jeremiah 4-9

Week #95; Wed, Oct 23: Jeremiah 4:1–9:26

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

1. Please click https://jwaministries.net/wp for all archived postings with search tools to query across all postings.

2. Even though God stands ready to destroy Israel and Judah, He says, “yet I will not make a full end.”

  • Inference: God has an overall “master plan” to restore His people Israel and Judah after the pending exile(s), therefore preserving an unbroken linage leading to the birth and life of His Son, Jesus Christ. Likewise, His plan includes restoration of His “pure kingdom” in heaven which must have an unbroken thread to and from Jesus across all time that extends into eternity. Watch for it through all of the prophets.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Jeremiah 4, Disaster in the North
1. “If you return, O Israel, declares the Lord, to me you should return. If you remove your detestable things from my presence, and do not waver, and if you swear, ‘As the Lord lives,’ in truth, in justice, and in righteousness, then nations shall bless themselves in him, and in him shall they glory.” (4:1-2)

  • Inference: “Declare in Judah, and proclaim in Jerusalem, and say, ‘Blow the trumpet through the land; cry aloud and say, ‘Assemble, and let us go into the fortified cities!’ Raise a standard toward Zion, flee for safety, stay not, for I bring disaster from the north, and great destruction. A lion has gone up from his thicket, a destroyer of nations has set out; he has gone out from his place to make your land a waste; your cities will be ruins without inhabitant. For this put on sackcloth, lament and wail, for the fierce anger of the Lord has not turned back from us.” (4:5-8)

2. “In that day, declares the Lord, courage shall fail both king and officials. The priests shall be appalled and the prophets astounded.” (4:9)

  • Inference: “Then I said, ‘Ah, Lord God, surely you have utterly deceived this people and Jerusalem, saying, ‘It shall be well with you,’ whereas the sword has reached their very life.'” (4:10)
  • Inference: “O Jerusalem, wash your heart from evil, that you may be saved. How long shall your wicked thoughts lodge within you?” (4:14)
  • Inference: “Besiegers come from a distant land; they shout against the cities of Judah. Like keepers of a field are they against her all around, because she has rebelled against me, declares the Lord. Your ways and your deeds have brought this upon you. This is your doom, and it is bitter; it has reached you very heart.” (4:16-18)

3. The Lord’s anguish over Judah’s desolation: “My anguish, my anguish! I writhe in pain! Oh the walls of my heart! My heart is beating wildly; I cannot keep silent, for I hear the sound of the trumpet, the alarm of war.” (4:19)

  • Inference: “For my people are foolish; they know me not; they are stupid children; they have no understanding. They are ‘wise’ in doing evil! But how to do good they know not.” (4:22)
  • Inference: “For thus says the Lord, ‘The whole land shall be a desolation; yet I will not make a full end. For this the earth shall mourn, and the heavens above be dark; for I have spoken; I have proposed; I have not relented, nor will I turn back.'” (4:27-28)

Jeremiah 5, Jerusalem Refused to Repent
1. “Run to and fro through the streets of Jerusalem, look and take note! Search her squares to see if you can find a man, one who does justice and seeks truth, that I may pardon her.” (5:1)

  • Inference: “Though they say, ‘As the Lord lives,’ yet they swear falsely. O Lord, do not your eyes look for truth? You have struck them down, but they felt no anguish; you have consumed them, but they refused to take corrections. They have made their faces harder than rock; they have refused to repent.” (5:2-3)

2. “How can I pardon you? Your children have forsaken me and have sworn by those who are no gods. When I fed them to the full, they committed adultery and trooped to the houses of whores. They were well-fed, lusty stallions, each neighing for his neighbor’s wife. Shall I not punish them for these things? declares the Lord; and shall I not avenge myself on a nation such as this?” (5:7-9)

  • Inference: “Go up through her vine rows and destroy, but make not a full end; strip away her branches, for they are not the Lord’s. For the house of Israel and the house of Judah have been utterly treacherous to me, declares the Lord. They have spoken falsely of the Lord and have said, ‘He will do nothing; no disaster will come upon us, nor shall we see sword or famine. The prophets will become wind; the word is not in them. Thus shall it be done to them!'” (5:10-13)

3. “But even in those days, declares the Lord, I will not make a full end of you. And when your people say, ‘Why has the Lord our God done all these things to us?’ you shall say to them, ‘As you have forsaken me and served foreign gods in your land, so you shall serve foreigners in a land that is not yours.'” (5:18-19)

  • Inference: “An appalling and horrible thing has happened in the land: the prophets prophesy falsely, and the priests rule at their direction; my people love to have it so, but what will you do when the end comes?” (5:30-31)

Jeremiah 6, Impending Disaster for Jerusalem
1. “To whom shall I speak and give warning, that they may hear? Behold, their ears are uncircumcised, they cannot listen; behold, the word of the Lord is to them an object of scorn; they take no pleasure in it.” (6:10)

  • Inference: “Therefore I am full of the wrath of the Lord; I am weary of holding it in. Pour it out upon the children in the street, and upon the gatherings of young men, also; both husband and wife shall be taken, the elderly and the very aged. Their houses shall be turned over to others, their fields and wives together, for I will stretch out my hand against the inhabitants of the land, declares the Lord.” (6:11-12)

2. “Thus says the Lord: ‘Stand by the roads, and look, and ask for the ancient paths, where the good way is; and walk in it, and find rest for your souls. But they said, ‘We will not walk in it.’ I set watchmen over you, saying, ‘Pay attention to the sound of the trumpet! But they said, ‘We will not pay attention.'” (6:16-17)

  • Inference: “Therefore hear, O nations, and know, O congregation, what will happen to them. Hear, O earth; behold, I am bringing disaster upon this people, the fruit of their devices, because they have not paid attention to my words; and as for my law, they have rejected it.” (6:18-19)
  • Inference: “Therefore thus says the Lord: ‘Behold, I will lay before this people stumbling blocks against which they shall stumble; fathers and sons together, neighbor and friend shall perish.'” (6:21-22)

3. “Behold, a people is coming from the north country, a great nation is stirring from the farthest parts of the earth. They lay hold on bow and javelin; they are cruel and have no mercy; the sound of them is like the roaring sea; they ride on horses, set in array as a man for battle, against you, O daughter of Zion!” (6:22-23)

  • Inference: “Go not out into the field, nor walk on the road, for the enemy has a sword; terror is on every side.” (6:25)

Jeremiah 7, Evil in the Land

1. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: ‘Stand in the gate of the Lord’s house, and proclaim there this word, and say, Hear the word of the Lord, all you men of Judah who enter these gates to worship the Lord. Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Amend your ways and your deeds and I will let you dwell in this place. Do not trust in these deceptive words: ‘This is the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord, the temple of the Lord.'” (7:1-4)

  • Inference: “For if you truly amend your ways and your deeds, if you truly execute justice one with another, if you do not oppress the sojourner, the fatherless, or the widow, or shed innocent blood in this place, and if you do not go after other gods to your own harm, then I will let you dwell in this place, in the land that I gave of old to your fathers forever.” (7:5-7)

2. “Behold, you trust in deceptive words to no avail. Will you steal, murder, commit adultery, swear falsely, make offerings to Baal, and go after other gods that you have not known, and then come and stand before me in this house, which is called by my name, and say, ‘We are delivered!–only to go on doing all these abominations? Has this house, which is called by my name, become a den of robbers in your eyes? Behold, I myself have seen it, declares the Lord. Go now to my place that was in Shiloh, where I made my name dwell at first, and see what I did to it because of the evil of my people Israel.” (7:8-12″

  • Inference: “And now, because you have done all these things, declares the Lord, and when I spoke to you persistently you did not listen, and when I called you, you did not listen, and when I called you, you did not answer, therefore I will do to the house that is called by my name, and in which you trust, and to the place that I gave to you and to your fathers, as I did to Shiloh. And I will cast you out of my sight, as I cast out all your kinsmen, all the offspring of Ephraim.” (7:13-15)
  • Inference: “As for you, do not pray for this people, or lift up a cry or prayer for them, and do not intercede with me, for I will not hear you.” (7:16)

3. “But this command I gave them: ‘Obey my voice, and I will be your God, and you shall be my people. And walk in all the way that I command you, that it may be well with you.'” (7:23)

  • Inference: “But they did not obey or incline their ear, but walked in their own counsels and the stubbornness of their evil hearts, and went backward and not forward.” (7:24)

4. “For the sons of Judah have done evil in my sight, declares the Lord. They have set their detestable things in the house that is called by my name, to defile it. And they have built the high places of Topeheth, which is in the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, to burn their sons and their daughters in the fire, which I did not command, nor did it come into my mind.” (7:30-31)

  • Inference: “Therefore, behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when it will no more be called Topheth, or the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, but the Valley of Slaughter; for they will bury in Topheth, because there is no room elsewhere.” (7:32)

Jeremiah 8, Bones in the Open
1. “At that time, declares the Lord, the bones of the kings of Judah, the bones of its officials, the bones of the priests, the bones of the prophets, and the bones of the inhabitants of Jerusalem shall be brought out of their tombs. And they shall be spread before the sun and the moon and all the host of heaven, which they have loved and served, which they have gone after, and which they have sought and worshiped. And they shall not be gathered or buried, They shall be as dung on the surface of the ground.” (8:1-2)

  • Inference: “Death shall be preferred to life by all the remnant that remains of this evil family in all the places where I have driven them, declares the Lord of hosts.” (8:3)

2. “Behold, the cry of the daughter of my people from the length and breadth of the land: ‘Is the Lord not in Zion? Is her King not in her? Why have they provoked me to anger with their carved images and with their foreign idols?'” (8:19)

  • Inference: “Is there no balm in Gilead? Is there no physician there? Why then has the health of the daughter of my people not been restored?” (8:22)

Jeremiah 9, Grieving for the Slain
1. “Oh that my head were waters, and my eyes a fountain of tears, that I might weep day and night for the slain of the daughter of my people! Oh that I had in the desert a travelers’ lodging place, that I might leave my people and go away from them! For they are all adulterers, a company of treacherous men. They bend their tongue like a bow; falsehood and not truth has grown strong in the land; for they proceed from evil to evil, and they do not know me, declares the Lord.” (9:1-3)

  • Inference: “Therefore thus says the Lord of hosts: ‘Behold, I will refine them and test them, for what else can I do, because of my people? Their tongue is a deadly arrow; it speaks deceitfully; with his mouth each speaks peace to his neighbor, but in his heart he plans an ambush for him. Shall I not punish them for these things? declares the Lord, and shall I not avenge myself on a nation such as this?” (9:7-9)

2. “Who is the man so wise that he can understand this? To whom has the mouth of the Lord spoken, that he may declare it? Why is the land ruined and laid waste like a wilderness, so that no one passes through? And the Lord says: ‘Because they have forsaken my law that I set before them, and have not obeyed my voice or walked in accord with it, but have stubbornly followed their own hearts and have gone after the Baals, as their fathers taught them.” (9:12-14)

  • Inference: “Therefore thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I will feed this people with bitter food, and give them poisonous water to drink. I will scatter them among the nations whom neither they nor their fathers have known, and I will send the sword after them, until I have consumed them.” (9:15-16)

3. “Thus says the Lord: ‘Let not the wise man boast in his wisdom, let not the mighty man boast in his might, let not the rich man boast in his riches, but let him who boasts boast in this, that he understands and knows me, that I am the Lord who practices steadfast love, justice, and righteousness in the earth. For in these things I delight, declares the Lord.” (9:23-24)

  • Inference: “Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will punish all those who are circumcised merely in the flesh–Egypt, Judah, Edom, the sons of Ammon, Moab, and all who dwell in the desert who cut the corners of their hair, for all these nations are uncircumcised, and all the house of Israel are uncircumcised in heart.” (9:25-26)

Week #96; Wed, Oct 30: Jeremiah 10-16

Week #96; Wed, Oct 30: Jeremiah 10:1–16:21

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

1. It appears that a larger biblical context is unfolding as we reflect back to our first week in 2018 and look forward to our final week in 2020.

  • Inference: Thoughts on the depth and breadth of God’s works seems to come to mind as we proceed in Jeremiah and as we are led by the Holy Spirit.
  • Inference: One such though filled my mind on God’s free-grace and our free-will that unfolded like this:
    1. Isaiah 14 addresses the war in heaven and Satans fall along with his not so angelic followers.
    2. Lucifer’s pride escaped his internal controls and he and his followers exercised their free-will to contend with God over ruling God’s kingdom, a big mistake although God knew the outcome before hand.
    3. The split resulted in a ratio of 2/3 of the angels opting for God’s side and 1/3 of the angels opting for Lucifer’s side.
    4. When humans were created, God gave them free-will just like the angels.
    5. Our free-will to exercise our choice to follow God or not has similar consequences as the angels.
    6. We will soon read how Jesus died for all; however, God will only accept believers back into His kingdom.
    7. God already knows who will become a believer and He sealed their names in the Lamb’s Book of Life before the foundation of the world.
    8. Someone asked me how God would permit some to be condemned and not want them all back in His kingdom.
    9. It has to be that God wants a restored pure kingdom where He will know that believers want to be on His side and not Satan’s side.
    10. I pictured all of the above at the breakfast table using a paper plate and the salt and pepper.
    11. I poured out a small quantity of both on the plate in separate piles for angels and humans.
    12. I then divided each pile into two to represent the free-will of angels and humans.
    13. By God’s free-grace, He knew which grain of each would be in which pile.
    14. So, our earthly environment is a temporary testing or proving ground.
    15. Yet, God knows the eternal outcome of our free-will choices that we make now here on earth.
    16. He is testing us now with His free-grace to enable us to make a free-will choice to believe.
    17. God sent Jesus to die for all, but we have to believe in Him and more than that, we must develop our relationship with Him from that point on.
    18. I visualize interlocking the fingers of our hands to imagine how tight our relationship should be.
    19. How tight is your relationship with Jesus, feel the presence of the Holy Spirit that He sent us.
    20. He already knows what you will do, just follow His Spirit.
  • Inference: Read on, Scripture gets richer and richer, particularly if it is read as one book containing all of God’s interrelated Word.

2. See click www.jwaministries.net in paragraph 1C for suggested software for quick text searches including a dramatized audio version.

3. Please click https://jwaministries.net/wp for all archived postings on page 1 and expanded reference list on page 3.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Jeremiah 10, Idols and the Living God
1. “Learn not the way of the nations, nor be dismayed at the signs of the heavens because the nations are dismayed at them, for the customs of the peoples are vanity. A tree from the forest is cut down and worked with an axe by the hands of a craftsman. They decorate it with silver and gold; they fasten it with hammer and nails so that it cannot move. Their idols are like scarecrows in a cucumber field, and they cannot speak; the have to be carried, for they cannot walk. Do not be afraid of them, for they cannot do evil, neither is it in them to do good.” (10:2-5)

  • Inference: “But the Lord is the true God; he is the living God and the everlasting King. At his wrath the earth quakes, and the nations cannot endure his indignation.” (10:10)
  • Inference: “Thus shall you say to them: ‘The gods who did not make the heavens and the earth shall perish from the earth and from under the heavens.'” (10:11)
  • Inference: “It is he who made the earth by his power, who established the world by his wisdom, and by his understanding stretched out the heavens.” (10:12)
  • Inference: “Pour out your wrath on the nations that know you not, and on the peoples that call not on your name, for they have devoured Jacob; they have devoured him and consumed him, and have laid waste his habitation.” (10:25)

Jeremiah 11, The Broken Covenant
1. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: ‘Hear the words of this covenant, and speak to the men of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem. You shall say to them, Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel. Cursed be the man who does not hear the words of this covenant that I commanded your fathers when I brought them out of the land of Egypt, from the iron furnace, saying, Listen to my voice, and do all that I command you. So shall you be my people, and I will be your God, that I may confirm the oath that I swore to your fathers, to give them a land flowing with milk and honey, as at this day.’ Then I answered, ‘So be it, Lord.'” (11:1-5)

  • Inference: “And the Lord said to me, ‘Proclaim all these words in the cities of Judah and in the streets of Jerusalem: Hear the words of this covenant and do them. For I solemnly warned your fathers when I brought them up out of the land of Egypt, warning them persistently, even to this day, saying, Obey my voice. Yet they did not obey or incline their ear, but everyone walked in the stubbornness of his evil heart. Therefore I brought upon them all the words of this covenant, which I commanded them to do, but they did not.” (11:6-8)
  • Inference: “Again the Lord said to me, ‘A conspiracy exists among the men of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem. They have turned back to the iniquities of their forefathers, who refused to hear my words.They have gone after other gods to serve them. The house of Israel and the house of Judah have broken my covenant that I made with their fathers.'” (11:9-10)
  • Inference: “‘Therefore, thus says the Lord, Behold, I am bringing disaster upon them that they cannot escape. Though they cry to me, I will not listen to them. Then the cities of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem will go and cry to the gods to whom they make offerings, but they cannot save them in the time of their trouble.'” (11:11-12)

2. “Can even sacrificial flesh avert your doom? Can you then exult?” (10:15)

  • Inference: “Therefore thus says the Lord concerning the men of Anathoth (city near Jerusalem), who seek your life, and say, ‘Do not prophesy in the name of the Lord, or you will die by our hand’–therefore thus says the Lord of hosts: ‘Behold, I will punish them. The young men shall die by the sword, their sons and their daughters shall die by famine, and none of them shall be left. For I will bring disaster upon the men of Anathoth, the year of their punishment.'” (11:21-23)

Jeremiah 12, Jeremiah’s Complaint
1. “Righteous are you, O Lord, when I complain to you; yet I would plead my case before you. Why does the way of the wicked prosper? Why do all who are treacherous thrive?” (12:1)

  • Inference: “You plant them, and they take root; they grow and produce fruit; you are near in their mouth and far from their heart.” (12:2)

2. “But you, O Lord, know me; you see me, and test my heart toward you. Pull them out like sheep for the slaughter, and set them apart for the day of slaughter.” (12:3)

  • Inference: “How long will the land mourn and the grass of every field wither? For the evil of those who dwell in it the beasts and the birds are swept away, because they said, ‘He will not see our latter end.'” (12:4)

3. “Thus says the Lord concerning all my evil neighbors who touch the heritage that I have my people Israel to inherit: ‘Behold, I will pluck them up from their land, and I will pluck up the house of Judah from among them.'” (12:14)

  • Inference: “And after I have plucked them up, I will again have compassion on them, and I will bring them again each to his heritage and each to his land. And it shall come to pass, if they will diligently learn the ways of my people, to swear by my name, ‘As the Lord lives,’ even as they taught my people to swear by Baal, then they shall be built up in the midst of my people. But if any nation will not listen, then I will utterly pluck it up and destroy it, declares the Lord.” (12:15-17)

Jeremiah 13, The Ruined Loincloth
1. “Thus says the Lord to me, ‘Go and buy a linen loincloth and put it around your waist, and do not dip it in water.’ So I bought a loincloth according to the word of the Lord, and I put it around my waist. And the word of the Lord came to me a second time, ‘Take the loincloth that you have bought, which is around your waist, and arise, go to the Euphrates and hide it there in a cleft of the rock.’ So I went and hid it by the Euphrates, as the Lord commanded me.” (13:1-5)

  • Inference: “And after many days, the Lord said to me, ‘Arise, go to the Euphrates, and take from there the loincloth that I commanded you to hide there.’ Then I went to the Euphrates, and dug, and I took the loincloth from the place where I had hidden it. And behold, the loincloth was spoiled, it was good for nothing.” (13:6-7)

2. “Then the word of the Lord came to me: ‘Thus says the Lord: Even so will I spoil the pride of Judah and the great pride of Jerusalem. This evil people, who refuse to hear my words, who stubbornly follow their own heart and have gone after other gods to serve them and worship them, shall be like this loincloth, which is good for nothing.” (13:8-10)

  • Inference: “For as the loincloth clings to the waist of a man, so I made the whole house of Israel and the whole house of Judah cling to me, declares the Lord, that they  might be for me a people, a name, a praise, and a glory, but they would not listen.” (13:11)
  • Inference: “You shall speak to them this word: ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, ‘Every jar shall be filled with wine.’ And they will say to you, ‘Do we not indeed know that every jar will be filled with wine?’ Then you shall say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord: Behold, I will fill with drunkenness all the inhabitants of this land: the kings who sit on David’s throne, the priests, the prophets, and all the inhabitants of Jerusalem. And I will dash them one against another, fathers and sons together, declares the Lord. I will not pity or spare or have compassion, that I should not destroy them.'” (13:12-14)

3. “But if you will not listen, my soul will weep in secret for your pride; my eyes will weep bitterly and run down with tears, because the Lord’s flock has been taken captive.” (13:17)

  • Inference: “And if you say in your heart, ‘Why have these things come upon me?’ it is for the greatness of your iniquity that your skirts are lifted up and you suffer violence.” (13:22)
  • Inference: “I will scatter you like chaff driven by the wind from the desert.” (13:24)
  • Inference: “I have seen your abominations, your adulteries and neighing, your lewd whorings, on the hills in the field. Woe to you, O Jerusalem! How long will it be before you are made clean?” (13:27)

Jeremiah 14, Famine, Sword, and Pestilence
1. “The word of the Lord that came to Jeremiah concerning the drought.” (14:1)

  • Inference: “Judah mourns, and her gates languish; her people lament on the ground, and the cry of Jerusalem goes up. Her nobles send their servants for water; they come to the cisterns; they find no water; they return with their vessels empty; they are ashamed and confounded and cover their heads.” (14:2-3)
  • Inference: “Though our iniquities testify against us, act, O Lord, for your name’s sake; for our backslidings are many; we have sinned against you.” (14:7)

2. “Thus says he Lord concerning this people: ‘They have loved to wander thus; they have not restrained their feet; therefore the Lord does not accept them; now he will remember their iniquity and punish their sins.'” (14:10)

  • Inference: “The Lord said to me: ‘Do not pray for the welfare of this people. Though they fast, I will not hear their cry, and though they offer burnt offering and grain offering, I will not accept them. But I will consume them by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence.‘” (14:11-12)

3. “Then I said: ‘Ah, Lord God, behold, the prophets say to them, ‘You shall not see the sword, nor shall you have famine, but I will give you assured peace in this place.'” (14:13)

  • Inference: “And the Lord said to me: ‘The prophets are prophesying lies in my name. I did not send them, nor did I command them or speak to them. They are prophesying to you a lying vision, worthless divination, and the deceit of their own minds. Therefore thus says the Lord concerning the prophets who prophesy in my name although I did not send them, and who say, ‘Sword and famine shall not come upon this land’: By sword and famine those prophets shall be consumed. And the people to whom they prophesy shall be cast out in the streets of Jerusalem, victims of famine and sword, with none to bury them–them, their wives, their sons, and their daughters. for I will pour out their evil upon them.” (14:14-16)

Jeremiah 15, The Lord Will Not Relent
1. “Then he Lord said to me, ‘Though Moses and Samuel stood before me, yet my heart would not turn toward this people. Send them out of my sight, and let them go! And when they ask you, ‘Where shall we go?’ you shall say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord: ‘Those who are for pestilence, to pestilence, and those who are for the sword, to the sword; those who are for famine, to famine, and those who are for captivity, to captivity.'” (15:1-2) 

  • Inference: “I will appoint over them four kinds of destroyers, declares the Lord: the sword to kill, the dogs to tear, and the birds of the air and the beasts of the earth to devour and destroy. And I will make them a horror to all the kingdoms of the earth because of what Manasseh the son of Hezekiah, king of Judah, did in Jerusalem.” (15:3-4)

2. Jeremiah complains . . . “Woe is me, my mother, that you bore me, a man of strife and contention to the whole land! I have not lent, nor have I borrowed, yet all of them curse me.” (15:10, Ex. 22:25)

  • Inference: “The Lord said, ‘Have I not set you free for their good? Have I not pleaded for you before the enemy in the time of trouble and in the time of distress? Can one break iron, iron from the north, and bronze? Your wealth and your treasures I will give as spoil, without price, for all your sins, throughout all your territory. I will make you serve your enemies in a land that you do not know, for in my anger a fire is kindled that shall burn forever.” (15:11-13)

Jeremiah 16, Famine, Sword, and Death
1. “The word of the Lord came to me: ‘You shall not take a wife, nor shall you have sons or daughters in this place. For thus says the Lord concerning the sons and daughters who are born in this place, and concerning the mothers who bore them and the fathers wh0 fathered them in this land: ‘They shall die of deadly diseases. They shall not be lamented, nor shall they be buried. They shall be as dung on the surface of the ground. They shall perish by the sword and by famine, and their dead bodies shall be food for the birds of the air and for the beasts of the earth.'” (16:1-4)

  • Inference: “You shall not go into the house of feasting to sit with them, to eat and drink.” (16:8)
  • Inference: “For thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I will silence in this place, before your eyes and in your days, the voice of mirth and the voice of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom and the voice of the bride.” (16:9)

2. “And when you tell this people all these words, and they say to you, ‘Why has the Lord pronounced all this great evil against us? What is our iniquity? What is the sin that we have committed against the Lord our God?'” (16:10)

  • Inference: “. . . then you shall say to them: ‘Because your fathers have forsaken me, declares the Lord, and have gone after other gods and have served and worshiped them, and have forsaken me and have not kept my law, and because you have done worse than your fathers, for behold, every one of you follows his stubborn evil will, refusing to listen to me. Therefore I will hurl you out of this land into a land that neither you nor your fathers have known, and there you shall serve other gods day and night, for I will show you no favor.'” (16:11-13)

3. The Lord Will Restore Israel. “Therefore, behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when it shall no longer be said, ‘As the Lord lives who brought up the people of Israel out of the land of Egypt,’ but ‘As the Lord lives who brought up the people of Israel out of the north country and out of all countries where he had driven them.’ For I will bring them back to their own land that I gave to their fathers.” (16:14-15)

  • Inference: “Therefore, behold, I will make them know, this once I will make them know my power and my might, and they shall know that my name is the Lord.” (16:21)

Week #97; Wed, Nov 06: Jeremiah 17–23

Week #97; Wed, Nov 06: Jeremiah 17:1–23:40

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

1. It is definitely worthwhile to read the related notes for a verse in a concordance that ties the prophecy to other prophecies and similar topics in the Old and New Testament Scriptures. Use of Bible software on your PC or pad/tablet or phone eases searches and broadens depth of knowledge. See paragraph “1C” at www.jwaministries.net for suggested software including a dramatized audio version.

  • Inference: Note how Jeremiah 23:6 ties to Romans 10:4 and 1 Corinthians 1:30

2. Please click https://jwaministries.net/wp for all searchable archived postings.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Jeremiah 17, The Sin of Judah
1. “The sin of Judah is written with a pen of iron; with a point of diamond it is engraved on the tablet of their heart, and on the horns of their altars, while their children remember their altars and their Asherim, beside every green tree and on the high hills, on the mountains in the open country.” (17:1-3)

  • Inference: “Your wealth and all your treasures I will give for spoil as the price of your high places for sin throughout all your territory. You shall loosen your hand from your heritage that I gave to you, and I will make you serve your enemies in a land that you do not know, for in my anger a fire is kindled that shall burn forever.” (17:3-4)
  • Inference: “‘Thus says the Lord: ‘Cursed is the man who trusts in man and makes flesh his strength, whose heart turns away from the Lord. He is like a shrub in the desert, and shall not see any good come. He shall dwell in the parched places of the wilderness, in an uninhabited salt land. Blessed is the man who trusts in the Lord, whose trust is the Lord. He is like a tree planted by water, that sends out its roots by the stream, and does not fear when heat comes, for its leaves remain green, and is not anxious in the year of drought, for it does not cease to bear fruit. The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it? I the Lord search the heart and test the mind, to give every man according to his ways, according to the fruit of his deeds.’ Like the partridge that gathers a brood that she did not hatch, so is he who gets riches but not by justice; in the midst of his days they will leave him, and at his end he will be a fool. A glorious throne set on high from the beginning is the place of our sanctuary. O Lord, the hope of Israel, all who forsake you shall be put to shame; those who turn away from you shall be written in the earth, for they have forsaken the Lord, the fountain of living water.” (17:5-13)
  • Inference: Jeremiah Prays for Deliverance. “Heal me, O Lord, and I shall be healed; save me, and I shall be saved, for you are my praise. Behold, they say to me, ‘Where is the word of the Lord? Let it come!’ I have not run away from being your shepherd, nor have I desired the day of sickness. You know what came out of my lips; it was before your face. Be not a terror to me; you are my refuge in the day of disaster. Let those be put to shame who persecute me, but let me not be put to shame; let them be dismayed, but let me not be dismayed; bring upon them the day of disaster; destroy them with double destruction!” (17:14-18)

2. Keep the Sabbath Holy. “Thus said the Lord to me: ‘Go and stand in the People’s Gate, by which the kings of Judah enter and by which they go out, and in all the gates of Jerusalem, and say: ‘Hear the word of the Lord, you kings of Judah, and all Judah, and all the inhabitants of Jerusalem, who enter by these gates. Thus says the Lord: Take care for the sake of your lives, and do not bear a burden on the Sabbath day or bring it in by the gates of Jerusalem. And do not carry a burden out of your houses on the Sabbath or do any work, but keep the Sabbath day holy, as I commanded your fathers. Yet they did not listen or incline their ear, but stiffened their neck, that they might not hear and receive instruction.” (17:19-23)

  • Inference: “‘But if you listen to me, declares the Lord, and bring in no burden by the gates of this city on the Sabbath day, but keep the Sabbath day holy and do no work on it, then there shall enter by the gates of this city kings and princes who sit on the throne of David, riding in chariots and on horses, they and their officials, the men of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem. And this city shall be inhabited forever. And people shall come from the cities of Judah and the places around Jerusalem, from the land of Benjamin, from the Shephelah, from the hill country, and from the Negev, bringing burnt offerings and sacrifices, grain offerings and frankincense, and bringing thank offerings to the house of the Lord.” (17:24-26)
  • Inference: “But if you do not listen to me, to keep the Sabbath day holy, and not to bear a burden and enter by the gates of Jerusalem on the Sabbath day, then I will kindle a fire in its gates, and it shall devour the palaces of Jerusalem and shall not be quenched.” (17:27)

Jeremiah 18, The Potter and the Clay.
1. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: ‘Arise, and go down to the potter’s house, and  there I will let you hear my words.’ So I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was working at his wheel. And the vessel he was making of clay was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel, as it seemed good to the potter to do.” (18:1-4)

  • Inference: “Then the word of the Lord came to me: ‘O house of Israel, can I not do with you as this potter has done? declares the Lord. Behold, like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in my hand, O house of Israel.” (18:5-8)
  • Inference: “If at any time I declare concerning a nation or a kingdom, that I will pluck up and beak down and destroy it, and if that nation, concerning which I have spoken, turns from its evil, I will relent of the disaster that I intended to do to it. And if at any time I declare concerning a nation or a kingdom that I will build and plant it, and if it does evil in sight, not listening to my voice, then I will relent of the good that I had intended to do to it.” (18:9-10)
  • Inference: “Now, therefore, say to the men of Judah and the inhabitants of Jerusalem: ‘Thus says the Lord, Behold, I am shaping disaster against you and devising a plan against you. Return, every one from his evil way, and amend your ways and your deeds.'” (18:11)

2. “But they say, ‘That is in vain! We will follow our own plans, and will every one act according to the stubbornness of his evil heart.'” (18:12)

  • Inference: “Therefore thus says the Lord: Ask among the nations, Who has heard the like of this? The virgin Israel has done a very horrible thing. Does the snow of Lebanon leave the crags of Sirion? Do the mountain waters run dry, the cold flowing streams? But my people have forgotten me; they make offerings to false gods; they made them stumble in their ways, in the ancient roads, and to walk into side roads, not the highway, making their land a horror, a thing to be hissed at forever. Everyone who passes by it is horrified and shakes his head. Like the east wind I will scatter them before the enemy. I will show them my back, not my face, in the day of their calamity.” (18:13-17)
  • Inference: “Yet you, O Lord, know all the plotting to kill me. Forgive not their iniquity, nor blot out their sin from your sight. Let them be overthrown before you; deal with them in the time of your anger.” (18:23)

Jeremiah 19, The Broken Flask
1. “Thus says the Lord, ‘Go buy a potter’s earthenware flask, and take some of the elders of the people and some of the elders of the priests, and go out to the Valley of the Son of Hinnom at the entry of the Potsherd Gate, and proclaim there the words that I tell you. You shall say, ‘Hear the word of the Lord, O kings of Judah and inhabitants of Jerusalem. Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I am bringing such disaster upon this place that the ears of everyone who hears of it will tingle.'” (19:1-3)

  • Inference: “Because the people have forsaken me and have profaned this place by making offerings in it to other gods whom neither they nor their fathers nor the kings of Judah have known; and because they filled this place with the blood of innocents, and have built the high places of Baal to burn their sons in the fire as burnt offerings to Baal, which I did not command or decree, nor did it come into my mind–therefore, behold, days are coming , declares the Lord, when this place shall no more be called Topheth, or the Valley of the Son of Hinnom, but the Valley of Slaughter. And in this place I will make void the plans of Judah and Jerusalem, and will cause their people to fall by the sword before their enemies, and by the hand of those who seek their life. I will give their dead bodies for food to the birds of the air and to the beasts of the earth. And I will make this city a horror, a thing to be hissed at. Everyone who passes by it will be horrified and will hiss because of all its wounds. And I will make them eat the flesh of their sons and their daughters, and everyone shall eat the flesh of his neighbor in the siege and in the distress, with which their enemies and those who seek their life afflict them.'” (19:4-9)

2. “Then you shall break the flask in the sight of the men who go with you, and shall say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts: So will I break this people and this city, as one breaks a potter’s vessel, so that it can never be mended. Men shall bury in Topheth because there will be no place else to bury.'” (19:10-11)

  • Inference: “Thus will I do to this place, declares the Lord, and to its inhabitants, making this city like Topheth. The houses of Jerusalem and the houses of the kings of Judah–all the houses on whose roofs offerings have been offered to all the host of heaven, and drink offerings have been poured out to other godsshall be defiled like the place of Topheth.” (19:12-13)

3. “Then Jeremiah came from Topheth, where the Lord had sent him to prophesy, and stood in the court of the Lord’s house and said to all the people: ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, behold, I am bringing upon this city and upon all its towns all the disaster that I have pronounced against it, because they have stiffened their neck, refusing to hear my words.'” (19:14-15)

Jeremiah 20, Jeremiah Persecuted by Pashhur
1. “Now Pashhur the priest, the son of Immer, who was chief officer in the house of the Lord, heard Jeremiah prophesying these things. Then Pashhur beat Jeremiah the prophet, and put him in the stocks that were in the upper Benjamin Gate of the house of the Lord.” (20:1-2)

  • Inference: “The next day, when Pashhur released Jeremiah from the stocks, Jeremiah said to him, ‘The Lord does not call your name Pashhur, but Terror On Every Side. For thus says the Lord: Behold, I will make you a terror to yourself and to all your friends. They shall fall by the sword of their enemies while you look on. And I will give all Judah into the hand of the king of Babylon. He shall carry them captive to Babylon, and shall strike them down with the sword. Moreover, I will give all the wealth of the city, all its gains, all its prized belongings, and all the treasures of the kings of Judah into the hand of their enemies, who shall plunder them and seize them and carry them to Babylon. And you, Pashhur, and all who dwell in your house, shall go into captivity. To Babylon you shall go, and there you shall die, and there you shall be buried, you and all  your friends, to whom you have prophesied falsely.'” (20:3-8)

2. Jeremiah reveals his personal grief . . . (20:7-18)

Jeremiah 21, Jerusalem Will Fall to Nebuchadnezzar
1. “This is the word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord, when King Zedekiah sent to him Pashhur the son of Malchiah and Zephaniah the priest, the son of Maaseiah, saying, ‘Inquire of the Lord for us, for Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon is making war against us. Perhaps the Lord will deal with us according to all his wonderful deeds and will make him withdraw from us.'” (21:1-2)

  • Inference: “Then Jeremiah said to them: ‘Thus you shall say to Zedekiah, ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel: ‘Behold, I will turn back the weapons of war that are in your hands and with which you are fighting against the king of Babylon and against the Chaldeans who are besieging you outside the walls.'” (21:3-4)
  • Inference: “I myself will fight against you with outstretched hand and strong arm, in anger and in fury and in great wrath. And I will strike down the inhabitants of this city, both man and beast. They shall die of a great pestilence. Afterward, declares the Lord, I will give Zedekiah king of Judah and his servants and the people in this city who survive the pestilence, sword, and famine into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and into the hand of their enemies, into the hand of those who seek their lives. He shall strike them down with the edge of the sword. He shall not pity them or spare them or have compassion.'” (21:5-7)
  • Inference: “‘And to this people you shall say: ‘Thus says the Lord: Behold, I set before you the way of life and the way of death. He who stays in this city shall die by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence, but he who goes out and surrenders to the Chaldeans who are besieging you shall live and shall have his life as a prize of war. For I have set my face against this city for harm and not for good, declares the Lord: it shall be given into the hand of the king of Babylon, and he shall burn it with fire.'” (21:8-10)

2. The house of David is not exempted and is singled out with a special message of condemnation for evil deeds. (21:11-14)

Jeremiah 22, Do Justice and Righteousness
1. “Thus says the Lord: ‘Go down to the house of the king of Judah and speak there this word, and say, ‘Hear the word of the Lord, O king of Judah, who sits on the throne of David, you, and your servants, and your people who enter these gates. Thus says the Lord: Do justice and righteousness, and deliver from the hand of the oppressor him who has been robbed. And do no wrong or violence to the resident alien, the fatherless, and the widow, nor shed innocent blood in this place. For if you will indeed obey this word, then there shall enter the gates of this house kings who sit on the throne of David riding in chariots and on horses, they and their servants and their people.'” (22:1-4)

  • Inference: “But if you will not obey these words, I swear by myself, declares the Lord, that this house shall become a desolation. For thus says the Lord concerning the house of the king of Judah:” (22:5)

2. The sons of Josiah are also not exempted and are singled out with a special message of condemnation for failure to obey the voice of the Lord. (22:11-30)

Jeremiah 23, The Righteous Branch
1. “Woe to the shepherds who destroy and scatter the sheep of my pasture! Therefore thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, concerning the shepherds who care for my people: ‘You have scattered my flock and have driven them away, and you have not attended to them. Behold, I will attend to you for your evil deeds, declares the Lord.” (23:1-2)

  • Inference: “Then I will gather the remnant of my flock out of all the countries where I have driven them, and I will bring them back to their fold, and they shall be fruitful and multiply. I will set shepherds over them who will care for them, and they shall fear no more, nor be dismayed, neither shall any be missing, declares the Lord.” (23:3-4)

2. “Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will raise up for David a righteous Branch, and he shall reign as king and deal wisely, and shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. In his days Judah will be saved, and Israel will dwell securely. And this is the name by which he will be called: ‘The Lord is our righteousness.'” (23:5-6)

  • Inference: It appears that “a righteous Branch” is the church age led by Jesus.
    • “For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to everyone who believes.” (Romans 10:4)
    • “And because of him you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom for God, righteousness and sanctification and redemption, so that, as it is written, ‘Let the one who boasts, boast in the Lord.'” (1 Corinthians 1:30)

3. “Am I a God at hand, declares the Lord, and not a God far away? Can a man hide himself in secret places so that I cannot see him? declares the Lord. Do I not fill heaven and earth? declares the Lord. I have heard what the prophets have said who prophesy lies in my name, saying, ‘I have dreamed, I have dreamed!’ How long shall there be lies in the heart of the prophets who prophesy lies, and who prophesy the deceit of their own heart, who think to make my people forget my name by their dreams that they tell one another, even as their fathers forgot my name for Baal. Let the prophet who has a dream tell the dream, but let him who has my word speak my word faithfully.” (23:23-28)

  • Inference: “Therefore, behold, I am against the prophets, declares the Lord, who steal my words from one another. Behold, I am against the prophets, declares the Lord, who use their tongues and declare, ‘declares the Lord.’ Behold, I am against those who prophesy lying dreams, declares the Lord, and who tell them and lead my people astray by their lies and their recklessness, when I did not send them or charge them. So they do not profit this people at all, declares the Lord.” (23:30-32)

 

Week #98; Wed, Nov 13: Jeremiah 24–30

Week #98; Wed, Nov 13: Jeremiah 24:1–30:24

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

1. Upon completing our readings to the point of hearing the prophets, it brings us to a point where inward thinking starts to settle in for personal utility. It appears to be a good time to fast forward to Colossians 3 and isolate three key words: above, earth, and below. When directions are applied to these words, they render a vertical, horizontal, and transverse context that can be labeled God, earthly, and evil respectively. When reading Scripture, the current topic can then be analyzed in an X, Y, and Z context and mentally plotted by pinpointing the following:

  • Finding(s)
  • Criteria
  • Condition
  • Cause
  • Effect
  • Recommendation

2. See paragraph “1C” at www.jwaministries.net for suggested PC and/or iPad/tablet software including a dramatized audio version.

3. Please click https://jwaministries.net/wp for all archived postings.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Jeremiah 24, The Good Figs and the Bad Figs
1. After Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon had taken into exile from Jerusalem Jeconiah the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, together with the officials of Judah, the craftsmen, and the metal workers, and had brought them to Babylon, the Lord showed me this vision: behold, two baskets of figs placed before the temple of the Lord. One basket had very good figs, like first-ripe figs, but the other basket had very bad figs, so bad that they could not be eaten. And the Lord said to me, ‘What do you see, Jeremiah?’ I said, ‘Figs, the good figs very good, and the bad figs very bad, so bad that they cannot be eaten.'” (24:1-3)

  • Inference: “Then the word of the Lord came to me: ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel: Like these good figs, so I will regard as good the exiles from Judah, whom I have sent away from this place to the land of the Chaldeans, I will set my eyes on them for good, and I will bring them back to this land. I will build them up, and not tear them down; I will plant them, and not uproot them. I will give them (by grace) a heart to know that I am the Lord, and they shall be my people and I will be their God, for they shall return to me with their whole heart.'” (24:4-7)
    • Finding–God’s “chosen” people turned away from Him
    • Criteria–The Lord demands a right relationship to know Him (visualize interlocking fingers)
    • Condition–His people need a new heart leading them back to the Lord (hear His voice)
    • Cause–His people turned away to evil and earthly temptations (pride and stiff necks)
    • Effect–Punishment (God humiliated them and imposed severe losses)
    • Recommendation–Return to the Lord (open heart and ears; follow Him, do His will with faith because of His love and His grace)

2. “But thus says the Lord: Like the bad figs that are so bad they cannot be eaten, so will I treat Zedekiah the king of Judah, his officials, the remnant of Jerusalem who remain in this land, and those who dwell in the land of Egypt.” (24:8)

  • Inference: “I will make them a horror to all the kingdoms of the earth, to be a reproach, a byword, a taunt, and a curse in all the places where I shall drive them. And I will send sword, famine, and pestilence upon them, until they shall be utterly destroyed from the land that I gave to them and their fathers.” (24:9-10)
    • Finding–King and officials, the remnant of Jerusalem, and Egypt will remain in exile
    • Criteria–His people will ultimately return and restore the land without evil and corrupt leaders leaders
    • Condition–Leaders will be made an example to others (made a horror, reproach, byword, taunt, and a curse; they shall be utterly destroyed)
    • Cause–Evil (bad figs)
    • Effect–Destroyed, sent into exile
    • Recommendation–Keep the land they were given pure and undefiled

Jeremiah 25, Seventy Years of Captivity
1. “The word that came to Jeremiah concerning all the people of Judah, in the fourth year of Jehoiakim the sons of Josiah, king of Judah (that was the first year of Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon), which Jeremiah the prophet spoke to all the people of Judah and all the inhabitants of Jerusalem: ‘For twenty-three years, from the thirteenth year of Josiah the son of Amon, king of Judah, to this day, the word of the Lord has come to me, and I have spoken persistently to you, but you have not listened. You have neither listened nor inclined your ears to hear, although the Lord persistently sent to you all his servants the prophets, saying, Turn now, every one of you, from his evil ways and evil deeds, and dwell upon the land that the Lord has given to you and your fathers from of old and forever.” (25:1-5)

  • Inference: “Do not go after other gods to serve and worship them, or provoke me to anger with the work of your hands. Then I will do you no harm. Yet you have not listened to me, declares the Lord, that you might provoke me to anger with the work of your hands to your own harm.” (25:6-7)
    • Finding–The inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem ignored the word of the Lord as delivered by Jeremiah for 23 years
    • Criteria–These inhabitants worshipped other gods and the works of their hands
    • Condition–The anger of the Lord was provoked by these inhabitants and their evil deeds
    • Cause–These inhabitants did not listen to the word of the Lord through Jeremiah
    • Effect–The anger of the Lord was unleashed on these inhabitants sending them into captivity for 70 years
    • Recommendation–These inhabitants need to turn back to the Lord and obey Him

2. “Therefore thus says the Lord of hosts: ‘Because you have not obeyed my words, behold, I will send for all the tribes of the north, declares the Lord, and for Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant, and I will bring them against this land and its inhabitants, and against all these surrounding nations. I will devote them to destruction, and make them a horror, a hissing, and an everlasting desolation. Moreover, I will banish from them the voice of mirth and the voice of gladness, the voice of the bridegroom (Jesus’ presence can be seen here) and the voice of the bride, the grinding of the millstones and the light of the lamp.” (25:8-10)

  • Inference: “This whole land shall become a ruin and a waste, and these nations shall serve the king of Babylon seventy years. Then after seventy years are completed, I will punish the king of Babylon and that nation, the land of the Chaldeans, for their iniquity, declares the Lord, making the land an everlasting waste. I will bring upon that land all the words that I have uttered against it, everything written in this book, which Jeremiah prophesied against all the nations. For many nations and great kings shall make slaves even of them, and I will recompense them according to their deeds and the work of their hands.” (25:11-14)
    • Finding–All the inhabitants of Judah and Jerusalem did not obey the words of the Lord
    • Criteria–The servant of the Lord was Nebuchadnezzar assigned to devote them to destruction
    • Condition–Banishment for seventy years
    • Cause–Worship of other gods and the works of their hands
    • Effect–Anger of the Lord provoked
    • Recommendation–Surrender to Babylon, go into exile, wait on the Lord

3. “Thus the Lord, the God of Israel, said to me: ‘Take from my hand this cup of the wine of wrath, and make all the nations to whom I send you drink it. They shall drink and stagger and be crazed because of the sword that I am sending among them.'” (25:15-16)

  • Inference: “So I took the cup from the Lord’s hand, and made all the nations to whom the Lord sent me drink it . . . all the kingdoms of the world that are on the face of the earth. And after them the king of Babylon shall drink.'” (25:17-27)
    • Finding–The cup of the Lord’s wrath is to be poured out to all the kingdoms of the world
    • Criteria–The sword of God’s wrath must be delivered to all kingdoms commanded to take the cup
    • Condition–Jeremiah has a mandate from the Lord
    • Cause–Punishment to the whole earth has been dictated by the Lord
    • Effect–They are to drink, fall, and rise no more, because of the sword of God’s wrath
    • Recommendation–Drink the cup of God’s wrath

Jeremiah 26, Jeremiah Threatened with Death

1. “In the beginning of the reign of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah, this word came from the Lord: ‘Thus says the Lord: Stand in the court of the Lord’s house, and speak to all the cities of Judah that come to worship in the house of the Lord all the words that I command you to speak to them; do not hold back a word.” (26:1-2)

  • Inference: “It may be they will listen, and every one turn from his evil way, that I may relent of the disaster that I intend to do to them because of their evil deeds. ‘You shall say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord: If you will not listen to me, to walk in my law that I have set before you, and listen to the words of my servants the prophets whom I send to you urgently, though you have not listened, then I will make this house like Shiloh, and I will make this city a curse for all the nations of the earth.'” (26:3-6)
    • Finding–The Lord holds out hope His people will listen and return to His ways (free-grace, free-will in operation)
    • Criteria–Jeremiah was commanded to speak to all of the worshipers that come to worship in the house of the Lord without holding back a word
    • Condition–Walk in the law of the Lord and listen to Jeremiah and the prophets
    • Cause–The Lord wants to hold back His wrath on His people; He wants to relent
    • Effect–The Lord will lose His wrath if His people listen and return to Him
    • Recommendation–Jeremiah urgently speaks to the worshipers in the house of the Lord as the Lord commanded him

2. “The priests and the prophets and all the people heard Jeremiah speaking these words in the house of the Lord. And when Jeremiah had finished speaking all that the Lord had commanded him to speak to all the people, then the priests and the prophets and all the people laid hold of him, saying, ‘You shall die!’ Why have you prophesied in the name of the Lord, saying, ‘This house shall be like Shiloh, and this city shall be desolate, without inhabitant’? And all the people gathered around Jeremiah in the house of the Lord.” (26:7-9)

  • Inference: “Then the priests and the prophets said to the officials and to all the people, ‘This man deserves the sentence of death, because he has prophesied against this city, as you have heard with your own ears.’ Then Jeremiah spoke to all the officials and all the people, saying, ‘The Lord sent me to prophesy against this house and this city all the words you have heard. Now therefore mend your ways and your deeds, and obey the voice of the Lord your God, and the Lord will relent of the disaster that he has pronounced against you. But as for me, behold, I am in your hands. Do with me as seems good and right to you. Only know for certain that if you put me to death, you will bring innocent blood upon yourselves and upon this city and its inhabitants, for in truth the Lord sent me to you to speak all these words in your ears.” (26:11-15)
    • Finding–The Lord sent a “last chance” to His people to mend their ways and deeds, and obey the voice of the Lord their God
    • Criteria–Return to the ways of the Lord, His people are needed to consummate His master plan
    • Condition–Jeremiah is threatened with death
    • Cause–The Lord’s people still will not follow the ways of the Lord
    • Effect–Jeremiah is spared from death by testimony of certain elders who arose speaking of Micah and Uriah who prophesied the same as Jeremiah in the days of Hezekiah and Jehoiakim
    • Recommendation–Jeremiah was spared, but Nebuchadnezzar looms so surrender needs serious consideration

Jeremiah 27, The Yoke of Nebuchadnezzar
1. “In the beginning of the reign of Zedekiah the son of Josiah, king of Judah, this word came to Jeremiah from the Lord. Thus the Lord said to me. ‘Make yourself straps and yoke-bars, and put them on your neck. Send word to the king of Edom, the king of Moab, the king of the sons of Ammon, the king of Tyre, and the king of Sidon by the hand of envoys who have come to Jerusalem to Zedekiah king of Judah. Give them this charge for their masters: ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: This is what you shall say to your masters: ‘It is I who by my great power and my outstretched arm have made the earth, with the men and animals that are on the earth, and I give it to whomever it seems right to me. Now I have given all these lands into the hand of Nebuchadnezzar, the king of Babylon, my servant, and I have given him all the beasts of the field to serve him. All the nations shall serve him and his son and his grandson, until the time of his own land comes. Then many nations of great kings shall make him their slave.” (27:1-7)

  • Inference: “But if any nation or kingdom will not serve this Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, and put its neck under the yoke of the king of Babylon, I will punish that nation with the sword, with famine, and with pestilence, declares the Lord, until I have consumed it by his hand . . . But any nation that will bring its neck under the yoke of the king of Babylon and serve him, I will leave on its own land, to work it and dwell there, declares the Lord.'” (27:8, 11)
    • Finding–The Lord declared that all nations must serve Nebuchadnezzar
    • Criteria–The Lord can give the kingdoms and lands to whomever it seems right to Him
    • Condition–The Lord dictates that all the nations shall serve Nebuchadnezzar
    • Cause–To make example of His great power over all the earth and bring His people to His law and will, through harsh submission to Babylon
    • Effect–The Lord’s edict is widespread over the whole world
    • Recommendation–compliance should follow; serve Nebuchadnezzar and live–ignore the false prophets

Jeremiah 28, Hananiah the False Prophet
1. “In the same year, at the beginning of the reign of Zedekiah king of Judah, in the fifth month of the fourth year, Hananiah, the son of Azzur, the prophet from Gibeon, spoke to me in the house of the Lord, in the presence of the priests and all the people, saying, ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: I have broken the yoke of the king of Babylon. Within two years I will bring back to this place all the vessels of the Lord’s house, which Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon took away from this place and carried to Babylon. I will also bring back to this place Jeconiah the son of Jehoiakim, king of Judah, and all the exiles from Judah who went to Babylon, declares the Lord, for I will break the yoke of the king of Babylon.'” (28:1-4)

  • Inference: “Then the prophet in the presence of the priests and all the people who were standing in the house of the Lord, and the prophet Jeremiah said, “Amen! May the Lord do so; may the Lord make the words that you have prophesied come true, and bring back to this place from Babylon the vessels of the house of the Lord, and all the exiles. Yet hear now this word that I speak in your hearing and in the hearing of all the people. The prophets who preceded you and me from ancient prophesied war, famine, and pestilence against many countries and great kingdoms. As for the prophet who prophesies peace, when the word of that prophet comes to pass, then it will be known that the Lord has truly sent the prophet. Sometime after . . . the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah: ‘Go, tell Hananiah, ‘Thus says the Lord: . . . I have put on the neck of all these nations an iron yoke to serve Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, and they shall serve him, for I have given to him even the beasts of the field.'” (28:5-9, 12, 14-17)
    • Finding–Hananiah is a false prophet intent on uttering rebellion against the Lord
    • Criteria–The Lord will overcome the false prophets to accomplish his will
    • Condition–Hannaniah died
    • Cause–Hannaniah uttered rebellion against the Lord to undermine God’s will
    • Effect–The Lord won
    • Recommendation–Don’t follow the false prophets like Hannaniah

Jeremiah 29, Jeremiah’s Letter to the Exiles
1. “These are the words of the letter that Jeremiah the prophet sent from Jerusalem to the surviving elders of the exiles, and to the priests, the prophets, and all the people, whom Nebuchadnezzar had taken into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon. . . . The letter was sent by the hand of Elasah the son of Shaphan and Gemariah the son of Hilkiah, whom Zedekiah king of Judah sent to Babylon to Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon. It said, ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel, to all the exiles whom I have sent into exile from Jerusalem to Babylon: Build houses and live in them; plant gardens and eat their produce. Take wives and have sons and daughters; take wives for your sons, and give your daughters in marriage, that they may bear sons and daughters; multiply there, and do not decrease. But seek the welfare of the city where I have sent you into exile, and pray to the Lord on its behalf, for in its welfare you will find your welfare.” (29:1-9)

  • Inference: “For thus says the Lord: When seventy years are completed for Babylon, I will visit you, and I will fulfill to you my promise and bring you back to this place. For I know the plans I have for you, declares the Lord, plans for welfare and not for evil, to give you a future and a hope. Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will hear you. You will seek me and find me, when you seek me with all your heart. I will be found by you, declares the Lord, and I will restore your fortunes and gather you from all the nations and all the places where I have driven you, declares the Lord, and I will bring you back to the place from which I sent you into exile.” (29:10-14)
    • Finding–Exiles shall build houses and raise families for 70 years in Babylon
    • Criteria–Pray for Babylon and do not decrease in number
    • Condition–The Lord will fulfill His promise and bring the exiles back
    • Cause–The Lord’s plans for the exiles will not be for evil, but to give them a future and a hope
    • Effect–Then they will call upon the Lord come and pray to Him with all their heart; He will hear them and He will restore their fortunes
    • Recommendation–Exiles should return to the place from which they were sent, He plans to use them to fulfill His master plan through Jesus

Jeremiah 30, Restoration for Israel and Judah
1. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel: Write in a book all the words that I have spoken to you. For behold, days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will restore the fortunes of my people, Israel and Judah, says the Lord, and I will bring them back to the land that I gave to their fathers, and they shall take possession of it.'” (30:1-3)

  • Inference: “Alas! That day is so great there is none like it; it is a time of distress for Jacob; yet he shall  be saved out of it.” (30:7)
    • Finding–Jacob and Israel’s fortunes will be restored
    • Criteria–The Lord’s city will be restored
    • Condition–The exiles will be God’s people and He will be their God
    • Cause–As promised by the Lord
    • Effect–The Lord will multiply the exiles and they will not be few
    • Recommendation–Rebuild to execute and accomplish the intentions of the mind of the Lord

Week #99; Wed, Nov 20: Jeremiah 31-35

Week #99; Wed, Nov 20: Jeremiah 31:1–35:19

Suggested archives: https://jwaministries.net/wp

Suggested software: www.jwaministries.net, paragraph 1-C

Suggested references: Page 7 in this Blog

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

I. It appears that an overarching biblical context is unfolding and should be incorporated in all remaining reading, particularly Week #100 through Week #156. Corrective “comments” are welcome.

A. Inference: Since week #1 in 2018, our blog postings increasingly reveal the height, depth and breadth of God’s Word that demands including God’s free-grace and our free-will.

B. Inference: And, as we recognize key events in His plan unfolding, I have attempted to plot 15 of those milestones in a loop that looks like this (Suggested diagram: www.jwaministries.net, paragraph 4-A):

  1. The Lamb’s Book of Life recorded God’s elect, chosen, and pre-destined before the foundation of the world (Proverbs 8:22-31, Matthew 25:31-46, John 10:28-30, Ephesians 1:4-14, Philippians 4:2-5, Revelation 3:4-6; 13:7-9; 17:7-9; 20:11-15; 22:18-20).
  2. Creation of earth and angels (Psalm 148:5; Revelation 12:7-12).
  3. War in heaven where Satan falls along with his not so angelic followers (Isaiah 14; Revelation 12:7-12).
  4. Lucifer’s pride escaped his internal controls and he and his followers exercised their free-will to contend with God over ruling God’s kingdom, a big mistake although God knew the outcome before hand (Isaiah 14; Revelation 12:7-12).
  5. The split resulted in a ratio of 2/3 of the angels opting for God’s side and 1/3 of the angels opting for Lucifer’s side. (Revelation 12:7-12)
  6. When humans were created, God gave them free-will just like the angels (Genesis 1, 3).
  7. Our free-will to exercise our choice to follow God or not has similar consequences as the angels (Genesis 3).
  8. We will soon read how Jesus died for all; however, God will only accept believers back into His kingdom (John 3:16-21).
  9. God already knows who will become a believer and He sealed their names in the Lamb’s Book of Life before the foundation of the world (2 Peter 3).
  10. Someone asked me how God would permit some to be condemned and not want them all back in His kingdom (Luke 18:7).
  11. It has to be that God wants a restored pure kingdom where He will know that believers want to be on His side and not Satan’s side (Hebrews 10:37-39).
  12. Yet, God knows the eternal outcome of our free-will choices that we make now here on earth (Ephesians 2:8).
  13. He is testing us now with His free-grace to make a free-will choice to believe (Luke 24:47).
  14. God sent Jesus to die for all, but we have to believe in Him and more than that, we must develop our relationship with Him from that point on (Matthew 4:17).
  15. I visualize interlocking the fingers of our hands to imagine how tight our relationship should be (John 15:4-5).

II. Upon completing our readings to the point of hearing the prophets, it brings us to a point where inward thinking starts to settle in for personal utility.

A. Inference: It appears to be a good time to fast forward to Colossians 3 and isolate three key words: above, earth, and below.

B. Inference: When directions are applied to these words, they render a vertical, horizontal, and transverse context that can be labeled God, earth, and Satan respectively (Suggested 3-D cartesian model: www.jwaministries.net, paragraph 4-B).

C. When reading Scripture, the current topic can then be analyzed in an X, Y, and Z context and mentally plotted by constantly pinpointing the following:

  1. Finding–Abnormality(ies) bearing on the mission (pertains to GAO, GAGAS Yellow Book)
  2. Criteria-Says who?  Who says this is a problem?
  3. Condition-What is the problem/issue? What is happening?
  4. Cause-How or why did the condition happen?
  5. Effect-So what? Why should the reader care about this condition? What is the impact?
  6. Recommendation-How do we resolve the condition/cause?

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Jeremiah 31, The Lord Will Turn Mourning to Joy
I. “At that time, declares the Lord, I will be the God of all the clans of Israel, and they shall be my people.” (31:1)

A. Inference: “Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will sow the house of Israel and the house of Judah with the seed of man and the seed of beast. And it shall come to pass that as I have watched over them to pluck up and break down, to overthrow, destroy, and bring harm, so I will watch over them to build and to plant, declares the Lord. In those days they shall no longer say: ‘The fathers have eaten sour grapes, and the children’s teeth are set on edge.’ But everyone shall die for his own sin. Each man who eats sour grapes, his teeth shall be set on edge.” (31:27-30)

  1. Finding–“He who scattered Israel will gather him, and will keep him as a shepherd keeps his flock.” (31:10)
  2. Criteria–“I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts. And I will be their God, and they shall be my people; . . . but everyone shall die for his own sin.” (31:30, 33)
  3. Condition–“I have watched over them to pluck up and break down, to overthrow, destroy, and bring harm.” (31:28)
  4. Cause–“I have loved you with an everlasting love; therefore I have continued my faithfulness to you.” (31:3)
  5. Effect–“The Lord will turn mourning to joy.” (31:13)
  6. Recommendation–“The planters shall plant and shall enjoy the fruit.” (31:5)

II. “Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah, not like the covenant that I made with their fathers on the day when I took them by the hand to bring them out of the land of Egypt, my covenant that they broke, though I was their husband, declares the Lord.” (31:31-32)

A. Inference: “But this is the covenant that I will make with the house of Israel after those days, declares the Lord: I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts. And I will be their God, and they shall be my people. And no longer shall each one teach his neighbor each his brother, saying, ‘Know the Lord,’ for they shall all know me, from the least of them to the greatest, declares the Lord. For I will forgive their iniquity, and I will remember their sin no more.” (31:33-34)

  1. Finding–“I will make a new covenant with the house of Israel and the house of Judah.” (31:31)
  2. Criteria–“I will put my law within them, and I will write it on their hearts.” (31:33)
  3. Condition-“And I will be their God, and they shall be my people. (31:33)
  4. Cause–The Lord’s people strayed from Him, turning to other gods and handmade idols, followed by exile.
  5. Effect–“. . . they shall all know me, from the least of them to the greatest, declares the Lord.” (31:34)
  6. Recommendation–Do not depart from the Lord and His ways; obey the Lord.

Jeremiah 32, Jeremiah Buys a Field During the Siege
I. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord in the tenth year of Zedekiah king of Judah, which was the eighteenth year of Nebuchadnezzar. At that time the army of the king of Babylon was besieging Jerusalem, and Jeremiah the prophet was shut up in the court of the guard that was in the palace of the king of Judah. For Zedekiah king of Judah had imprisoned him, saying, ‘Why do you prophesy and say, ‘Thus says the Lord: Behold, I am giving this city into the hand of the king of Babylon, and he shall capture it; Zedekiah king of Judah shall not escape out of the hand of the Chaldeans, but shall surely be given into the hand of the king of Babylon, and shall speak with him face to face and see him eye to eye.” (32:1-4)

A. Inference: “Jeremiah said, ‘The word of the Lord came to me: Behold, Hanamel the son of Shallum your uncle will come to you and say, Buy my field that is at Anathoth, for the right of redemption by purchase is yours. Then Hanamel my cousin came to me in the court of the guard, in accordance with the word of the Lord, and said to me, ‘Buy my field that is at Anathoth in the land of Benjamin, for the right of possession and redemption is yours; buy it for yourself. Then I knew that this was the word of the Lord.'” (32:6-8)

  1. Finding–Jeremiah the prophet was shut up in the court of the guard that was in the palace and the Lord declared that he was to go and buy a field.
  2. Criteria-The word of the Lord gave Jerusalem to the king of Babylon and he shall capture it.
  3. Condition-Jerusalem is under siege by the Chaldeans and is about to fall.
  4. Cause-Zedekiah king of Judah had imprisoned Jeremiah for his prophesy that the king would be taken to Babylon to face Nebuchadnezzar because the people did not obey the Lord (worshiped Baal and other gods).
  5. Effect-Even pending the exile of inhabitants of Jerusalem, the Lord revealed his promise for his people.
  6. Recommendation-“The word of the Lord came to Jeremiah to buy the field of his uncle Shallum; Jeremiah bought the field for seventeen shekels of silver and placed the deeds in an earthenware vessel for the Lord said, ‘Houses and fields and vineyards shall again be bought in this land.'”

Jeremiah 33, The Lord Promises Peace
I. “The word of the Lord came to Jeremiah a second time, while he was still shut up in the court of the guard: ‘Thus says the Lord who made the earth, the Lord who formed it to establish it–the Lord is his name: Call to me and I will answer you, and will tell you great and hidden things that you have not known.'” (33:1-3)

A. Inference: “‘Give thanks to the Lord of hosts, for the Lord is good, for his steadfast love endures forever!’ For I will restore the fortunes of the land as at first, says the Lord.” (33:11)

  1. Finding–While Jeremiah the prophet was shut up in the court of the guard that was in the palace, the Lord declared that ‘David shall never lack a man to sit on the throne of the house of Israel.'”
  2. Criteria–The Lord’s covenant with David.
  3. Condition–Hidden things will be revealed about promises of peace.
  4. Cause–The Lord has a master plan that spans a greater amount of time than the defeat, exile, and return of his people from Babylon.
  5. Effect–Peace, joy, and forgiveness are on the other side of the current conflict and siege of Jerusalem.
  6. Recommendation–Be patient and wait on the Lord; call on the Lord, wait for his answer.

II. “Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will fulfill the promise I made to the house of Israel and the house of Judah. In those days and at that time I will cause a righteous Branch to spring up for David, and he shall execute justice and righteousness in the land. In those days Judah will be saved, and Jerusalem will dwell securely. And this is the name by which it will be called: ‘The Lord is our righteousness.‘” (33:14-18)

A. Inference: “For thus says the Lord: ‘David shall never lack a man to sit on the throne in the house of Israel, and the Levitical priests shall never lack a man in my presence to offer burnt offerings, to burn grain offerings, and to make sacrifices forever.'” (33:17-18)

  1. Finding–A righteous Branch (Jesus can be seen here) shall execute justice and righteousness in the land.
  2. Criteria–The righteous Branch to come sets out a provision for eternal peace in the Lord’s pure kingdom at the end of the age.
  3. Condition–There is a fixed order of heaven and earth. (33:25)
  4. Cause–The Lord promises to restore their fortunes and will have mercy on them. (33:11, 26)
  5. Effect–This new covenant from the Lord is unbreakable then and now.
  6. Recommendation–Trust in the Lord.

Jeremiah 34, Zedekiah to Die in Babylon
I. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord, when Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army and all the kingdoms of the earth under his dominion and all the peoples were fighting against Jerusalem and all of its cities: ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel: Go and speak to Zedekiah king of Judah and say to him, ‘Thus says the Lord: Behold, I am giving this city into the hand of the king of Babylon, and he shall burn it with fire. You shall not escape from his hand but shall surely be captured and delivered into his hand. You shall see the king of Babylon eye to eye and speak with him face to face. And you shall go to Babylon.'” (34:1-3)

A. Inference: “Yet hear the word of the Lord, O Zedekiah king of Judah! Thus says the Lord concerning you: ‘You shall not die by the sword. You shall die in peace. And as spices were burned for your fathers, the former kings who were before you, so people shall burn spices for you and lament for you, saying, ‘Alas, lord!’ For I have spoken the word declares the Lord.” (34:4-5)

  1. Finding–Zedekiah king of Judah will die in Babylon in peace
  2. Criteria–Declaration of the Lord
  3. Condition–Jerusalem is given into the hand of the king of Babylon and burned by fire.
  4. Cause–The Lord is angry because the people turned away and worshiped other gods and idols.
  5. Effect–The city is captured and it’s inhabitants are taken to Babylon.
  6. Recommendation–Surrender.

II.”The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord, after King Zedekiah had made a covenant with all the people in Jerusalem to make a proclamation of liberty to them, that everyone should set free his Hebrew slaves, male and female, so that no one should enslave a Jew, his brother. And they obeyed, all the officials and all the people who had entered into the covenant that everyone would set free his slave, male or female, so that they would not be enslaved again. They obeyed and set them free.”  (34:8-10)

A. Inference: “But afterward they turned around and took back the male and female slaves they had set free, and brought them into subjection as slaves. The word of the Lord came to Jeremiah from the Lord: ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel: I myself made a covenant with your fathers when I brought them out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage, saying, ‘At the end of seven years each of you must set free the fellow Hebrew who has been sold to you and has served you six years; you must set him free for your service.’ But your fathers did not listen to me or incline their ears to me. You recently repented  and did what was right in my eyes by proclaiming liberty, each to his neighbor, and you made a covenant before me in the house that is called by my name, but then you turned around and profaned my name when each of you took back his male and female slaves, whom you had set free according to their desire, and you brought them into subjection to be your slaves.” (34:11-16)

  1. Finding–The inhabitants broke the proclamation of liberty to set free his Hebrew slaves, male and female which they obeyed; however, they broke the proclamation and took back their slaves.
  2. Criteria–The people repented and did what was right per the proclamation to free their slaves, they digressed and reclaimed them, returning them to slavery.
  3. Condition–Even though the people repented and freed their slaves, they took them back and returned them to bondage even while the invading army withdrew from Jerusalem
  4. Cause–The people did not obey the proclamation of liberty for their slaves.
  5. Effect–The Lord was angered by the transgression of the people and he proclaimed they would be given to the sword, famine and pestilence.
  6. Recommendation–Go into the hands of their enemies and into the hand of those who seek their lives.

Jeremiah 35, The Obedience of the Rechabites
I. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord in the days of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah: ‘Go to the house of the Rechabites and speak with them and bring them to the house of the Lord, into one of the chambers; then offer them wine to drink.'” (35:1-2)

A. Inference: “Then I set before the Rechabites pitchers full of wine, and cups, and I said to them, ‘Drink wine.’ But they answered, ‘We will drink no wine, for Jonadab the son of Rechab, our father, commanded us, ‘You shall not dink wine, neither you nor your sons forever. You shall not build a house; you shall not sow seed; you shall not plant or have a vineyard; but you shall live in tents all your days, that you may live many days in the land where you sojourn.’ We have obeyed the voice of Jonadab the son of Rechab, our father, in all that he commanded us, to drink no wine in all our days, ourselves, our wives, our sons, or our daughters, and not to build houses to dwell in. We have no vineyard or field or seed, but we have lived in tents and have obeyed and done all that Jonadab our father commanded us.” (35:5-10)

  1. Finding–The Rechabites were obedient to their father’s commands not to drink wine, build houses, plant or have a vineyard, or sow seed demonstrating how to follow commands.
  2. Criteria–The Lord sent to his people the prophets saying, “Turn now every one of you from his evil way, and amend your deeds, and do not go after other gods to serve them, and then you shall dwell in the land that I gave to you and your fathers.”
  3. Condition–The Lord needed an example to use to show his people how he desired obedience; he used the Rechabites.
  4. Cause–The people disobeyed God and worshiped other gods and handmade idols.
  5. Effect–The Recabites obeyed the command of Jonadab and kept all his precepts and did all that he commanded.
  6. Recommendation–The people of Judah, Israel, and Jerusalem should obey God like the Recabites obeyed their father.

Week #100; Wed, Nov 27: Jeremiah 36–41

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Suggested software: www.jwaministries.net, paragraph 1-C

Suggested references: Page 7 in this Blog

Week #100; Wed, Nov 27: Jeremiah 36:1-41:18

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

I. It appears that a larger biblical context is unfolding as we reflect back to our first week in 2018 and look forward to our final week in 2020.

A. Inference: Thoughts of the depth and breadth of God’s works seems to settle into our conscious as we proceed and as we are led by the Holy Spirit.

B. Inference: One such though filled my mind on God’s free-grace and our free-will that unfolded like this:

  1. The Lamb’s Book of Life is the “Boss File” that was compiled before the foundation of the world; It is referenced at least ten times in the Bible (Page 7; I. Books A.; Table 12 pertains).
  2. Isaiah 14 addresses the war in heaven and Satans fall along with his not so angelic followers.
  3. Lucifer’s pride escaped his internal controls and he and his followers exercised their free-will to contend with God over ruling God’s kingdom, a big mistake although God knew the outcome before hand.
  4. The split resulted in a ratio of 2/3 of the angels opting for God’s side and 1/3 of the angels opting for Lucifer’s side.
  5. When humans were created, God gave them free-will just like the angels.
  6. Our free-will to exercise our choice to follow God or not has similar consequences as the angels.
  7. We will soon read how Jesus died for all; however, God will only accept believers back into His kingdom.
  8. God already knows who will become a believer and He sealed their names in the Lamb’s Book of Life before the foundation of the world.
    • Someone asked me how God would permit some to be condemned and not want them all back in His kingdom.
    • It has to be that God wants a restored pure kingdom where He will know that believers want to be on His side and not Satan’s side.
    • I pictured all of the above at the breakfast table using a paper plate and the salt and pepper.
    • I poured out a small quantity of both on the plate in separate piles for angels and humans.
    • I then divided each pile into two to represent the free-will of angels and humans.
    • By God’s free-grace, He knew which grain of each would be in which pile.
    • So, our earthly environment is like a temporary testing or proving ground.
  9. Yet, God knows the eternal outcome of our free-will choices that we make now here on earth.
  10. He is testing us now by His free-grace for us to make a free-will choice to believe.
  11. God sent Jesus to die for all, but we have to believe in Him and more than that, we must develop our relationship with Him from that point on; blasphemy brings about deletion of a name from the Lambs Book of Life.
  12. At the rapture, Jesus will meet believers in the sky at the “Bema Seat” of Christ to receive one of five crowns as reward.
  13. A seven year period of tribulation will follow; the battle of Armageddon ends the period with the second coming of Christ with his angels who will gather any converted Jews and gentiles and defeat Satan and his demons.
  14. A 1,000 year reign begins peace on earth as Satan is bound during this period.
  15. The period ends with Jesus on the Great White Throne of final judgment.
  16. The New Jerusalem will descend to a fire purified earth and sit on Mount Zion in the former Jerusalem for eternity.

C. Inference: Read on. Scripture gets richer and richer, particularly if it is read as one book containing all of God’s interrelated Word.

II. Upon completing our readings to hearing from the prophets, it brings us to a point where inward thinking starts to settle in for personal use.

A. It appears to be a good time to fast forward to Colossians 3 and isolate three key words: above, earth, and below. When directions are applied to these words, they render a vertical, horizontal, and transverse context that can be labeled God, earthly, and evil respectively.

B. When reading Scripture, the current topic can then be analyzed in an X, Y, and Z context and easily mentally plotted using a single toy jax (stick out the thumb, pointer finger, and middle finger of your right hand so that they are perpendicular to each other, and then let your thumb be the “good” or positive x-axis, let your pointer finger be the “bad” or positive y-axis, and let your middle finger be the “ugly” or positive z-axis. Plot the following observation points to gain a fuller understanding of the topic’s position (GAO, GAGAS Yellow Book pertains):

  1. Finding–Abnormality(ies) bearing on the mission
  2. Criteria-Says who?  Who says this is a problem?
  3. Condition-What is the problem/issue? What is happening?
  4. Cause-How or why did the condition happen?
  5. Effect-So what? Why should the reader care about this condition? What is the impact?
  6. Recommendation-How do we resolve the condition/cause?

III. See paragraph 1C at www.jwaministries.net for suggested PC and/or iPad/tablet software including a dramatized audio version.

IV. Please click https://jwaministries.net/wp for all archived postings.

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:
Jeremiah 36, Jehoiakim Burns Jeremiah’s Scroll
I. “In the fourth year of Jehoiakim the son of Josiah, king of Judah, this word came to Jeremiah from the Lord: ‘Take a scroll and write on it all the words that I have spoken to you, from the days of Josiah until today. It may be that the house of Judah will hear all the disaster that I intend to do to them, so that everyone may turn from his evil way, and that I may forgive their iniquity and their sin.'” (36:1-3)

A. Inference: “Then Jeremiah called Baruch the son of Neriah, and Baruch wrote on a scroll at the dictation of Jeremiah all the words of the Lord that he had spoken to him. And Jeremiah ordered Baruch, saying, ‘I am banned from going to the house of the Lord, so you are to go, and on a day of fasting in the hearing of all the people in the Lord’s house you shall read the words of the Lord from the scroll that you have written at my dictation. You shall read them also in the hearing of all the men of Judah who come out of their cities. It may be that their plea for mercy will come before the Lord, and that every one will turn from his evil way, for great is the anger and wrath that the Lord has pronounced against this people.” (36:4-7)

  1. Finding–The Lord speaks to Jeremiah to warn his people of his anger and wrath because of their evil way.
  2. Criteria–The Lord wanted his people to worship him only and not other gods or hand made idols.
  3. Condition–Jeremiah was banned by the king from going to the house of the Lord so he sent Baruch to read the words of the Lord from a scroll he dictated.
  4. Cause–The Lord wanted everyone to turn from his evil way; he wanted to grant mercy when they repented.
  5. Effect–The Lord intended to dispense harsh punishment without repentance by his people.
  6. Recommendation–Baruch needs to read the scroll with the words of the Lord to the people.

II. During a fast proclaimed before the Lord, Baruch read the words of Jeremiah from the scroll, in the house of the Lord. Micaiah went down to the king’s house and told the officials all the words that he had heard when Baruch read the scroll in the hearing of the people. Baruch then read the scroll before the king’s officials. They feared the words of the Lord and sent Baruch and Jeremiah into hiding. They went into the court to the king, and they reported all the words to the king. Jehudi read it to the king and all the officials who stood beside the king. (36:10-21)

A. Inference: “As Jehudi read three or four columns, the king would cut them off with a knife and throw them into the fire in the fire pot until the entire scroll was consumed in the fire that was in the pot. . . . After the king had burned the scroll with the words that Baruch wrote at Jeremiah’s dictation, the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah: Take another scroll and write on it all the former words that were in the first scroll, which Jehoiakim the king of Judah has burned. And concerning Jehoiakim king of Judah you shall say, ‘Thus says the Lord, You have burned this scroll, saying, ‘Why have you written in it that the king of Babylon will certainly come and destroy this land, and will cut off from it man and beast?’ Therefore thus says the Lord concerning Jehoiakim king of Judah: he shall have none to sit on the throne of David, and his dead body shall be cast out to the heat by day and the frost by night. And I will punish him and his offspring and his servants for their iniquity. I will bring upon them and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem and upon the people of Judah all the disaster that I have pronounced against them, but they would not hear.'” (36:23, 27-31)

  1. Finding–The king did not listen to the word of the Lord provided by the scroll from Jeremiah.
  2. Criteria–The Lord will not allow his covenant with David to be broken.
  3. Condition–The king and the people did not hear and heed the words of the Lord that were sent by the Lord through Jeremiah.
  4. Cause–The king and the people did not fear the Lord.
  5. Effect–Disaster will be delivered as pronounced on the king and the people.
  6. Recommendation–Recognize their sins, repent, turn back to the Lord, seek mercy, or prepare for disaster.

Jeremiah 37, Jeremiah Warns Zedekiah
I. “Zedekiah the son of Josiah, who Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon made king in the land of Judah, reigned instead of Coniah the son of Jehoiakim. But neither he nor his servants nor the people of the land listened to the words of the Lord that he spoke through Jeremiah the prophet.” (37:1-2)

A. Inference: “King Zedekiah sent Jehucal the son of Shelemiah, and Zephaniah the priest, the son of Maaseiah, to Jeremiah the prophet, saying, ‘Please pray for us to the Lord our God.’ Now Jeremiah was still going in and out among the people, for he had not yet been put in prison. The army of Pharaoh had come out of Egypt. And when the Chaldeans who were besieging Jerusalem heard news about them, they withdrew from Jerusalem.” (37:3-5)

  1. Finding–The Chaldeans withdrew from Jerusalem on word that the army of Pharaoh had left Egypt headed for Jerusalem.
  2. Criteria–The Lord is still intent on the people being taken to Babylon.
  3. Condition–Zedekiah sent word to Jeremiah to have him pray to the Lord.
  4. Cause–The Lord wants the people to see their sin, repent, and turn back to him.
  5. Effect–There is no way out of going to Babylon without a change of heart toward the Lord.
  6. Recommendation–Defeat and exile must be accepted without a reversal in total reliance on the Lord.

II. “Then the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah the prophet: “Thus says the Lord, God of Israel: Thus shall you say to the king of Judah who sent you to me to inquire of me, ‘Behold, Pharaoh’s army that came to help you is about to return to Egypt, to its own land. And the Chaldeans shall come back and fight against this city. They shall capture it and burn it with fire. Thus says the Lord, Do not deceive yourselves, saying, ‘The Chaldeans will surely go away from us,’ for they will not go away. For even if you should defeat the whole army of Chaldeans who are fighting against you, and there remained of them only wounded men, every man in his tent, they would rise up and burn this city with fire.'” (37:5-10)

A. Inference: “Now when the Chaldean army had withdrawn from Jerusalem at the approach of Pharaoh’s army, Jeremiah set out from Jerusalem to go to the land of Benjamin to receive his portion there among the people. When he was at the Benjamin Gate, a sentry there named Irijah the son of Shelemiah, son of Hannah, seized Jeremiah the prophet, saying, ‘You are deserting to the Chaldeans.’ And Jeremiah said, ‘It is a lie; I am not deserting to the Chaldeans.’ But Irijah would not listen to him, and seized Jeremiah and brought him to the officials. And the officials were enraged at Jeremiah, and they beat him and imprisoned him in the house of Jonathan the secretary, for it had been made a prison.” (37:11-15)

  1. Finding–The people are without the army of Egypt; they face the Chaldeans again and Jeremiah is taken to prison.
  2. Criteria–The people do not want to turn back to the Lord; they blame Jeremiah for bringing the bad news.
  3. Condition–Jeremiah suffered harsh beatings.
  4. Cause–The people did not want to hear or believe his words from the Lord.
  5. Effect–The Chaldeans will not relent in taking Jerusalem and taking the people to Babylon.
  6. Recommendation–Keep praying and turn back to the Lord.

III. “When Jeremiah had come to the dungeon cells and remained there many days, King Zedekiah sent for him and received him. The king questioned him secretly in his house and said, ‘Is there any word from the Lord?’ Jeremiah said, ‘There is.’ Then he said, ‘You shall be delivered into the hand of the king of Babylon.'” (37:16-17)

A. Inference: Jeremiah also said to King Zedekiah, ‘What wrong have I done to you or your servants or this people, that you have put me in prison? Where are your prophets who prophesied to you, saying, ‘The king of Babylon will not come against you and against this land‘? Now hear, please, O my lord the king: let my humble plea come before you and do not send me back to the house of Jonathan the secretary, lest I die there. So King Zedekiah gave orders, and they committed Jeremiah to the court of the guard. And a loaf of bread was given him daily from the bakers’ street, until all the bread of the city was gone. So Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard.” (37:18-21)

  1. Finding–King Zedekiah resistence starts to crack and he meets secretly with Jeremiah to learn of any word from the Lord.
  2. Criteria–The word of the Lord is unchanging.
  3. Condition–There was word from the Lord.
  4. Cause–False prophets continue to say that Babylon will not come against Jerusalem.
  5. Effect–The false prophets are believable because of a preferred outcome over exile.
  6. Recommendation–Turn away from the false prophets.

Jeremiah 38, Jeremiah Cast into the Cistern
I. Jeremiah cast into the cistern. “. . . Jeremiah was saying to all the people, ‘Thus says the Lord: ‘He who stays in this city shall die by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence, but he who goes out to the Chaldeans shall live, He shall have his life as a prize of war, and live. Thus says the Lord: This city shall surely be given into the hand of the army of the king of Babylon and be taken.'” (38:1-3)

A. Inference: “Then the officials said to the king, ‘Let this man be put to death, for he is weakening the hands of the soldiers who are left in this city, and the hands of all the people, by speaking such words to them. For this man is not seeking the welfare of this people, but their harm.'” (38:4)

  1. Finding–Jeremiah continues to speak the word of the Lord that the city will fall to the Chaldeans.
  2. Criteria–The word of the Lord through Jeremiah never changes; no false prophesy.
  3. Condition–Gloom over pending defeat by the Chaldeans.
  4. Cause–Jeremiah’s message is not being heard.
  5. Effect–Gloom remains.
  6. RecommendationIf you return to the Lord that is best, then the Lord will provide mercy, else give up the city. (classic if, then, else reasoning)

II. Jeremiah rescued from the cistern. “So they took Jeremiah and cast him into the cistern of Malchiah, the king’s son, which was in the court of the guard, letting Jeremiah down by ropes. And there was no water in the cistern, but only mud, and Jeremiah sank in the mud.” (38:6)

A. Inference: “Ebed-melech went from the king’s house and said to the king, ‘My Lord the king, these men have done evil in all that they did to Jeremiah the prophet by casting him into the cistern, and he will die there of hunger, for there is no bread left in the city.’ Then the king commanded Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, ‘Take thirty men with you from here, and lift Jeremiah the prophet out of the cistern before he dies.’ So Ebed-melech took the men with him and went to the house of the king, to a wardrobe in the storehouse, and took from there old rags and worn-out clothes, which he let down to Jeremiah in the cistern by ropes. Then Ebed-melech the Ethiopian said to Jeremiah, ‘Put the rags and clothes between you armpits and the ropes.’ Jeremiah did so. Then they drew Jeremiah up with ropes and lifted him out of the cistern. And Jeremiah remained in the court of the guard.” (38:8-13)

  1. Finding–Jeremiah was was cast into the cistern.
  2. Criteria–The people wanted to follow false prophets and deny the Lord even with known gloom and doom.
  3. Condition–Only mud and no food in the cistern for Jeremiah.
  4. Cause–The refusal of the people to follow the Lord.
  5. Effect–The Lord will deliver harsh punishment.
  6. Recommendation–Listen to Jeremiah.

III. Jeremiah warns Zedekiah again. “King Zedekiah sent for Jeremiah the prophet and received him at the third entrance of the temple of the Lord. The king said to Jeremiah, ‘I will ask you a question; hide nothing from me.’ Jeremiah said to Zedekiah, ‘If I tell you, will you not surely put me to death? And if I give you counsel, you will not listen to me.’ Then King Zedekiah swore secretly to Jeremiah, ‘As the Lord lives, who made our souls, I will not put you to death or deliver you into the hand of these men who seek your life.'” (38:14-16)

A. Inference: “Then Jeremiah said to Zedekiah, ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of hosts, the God of Israel: If you will surrender to the officials of the king of Babylon, then your life shall be spared, and this city shall not be burned with fire, and you and your house shall live. But if you do not surrender to the officials of the king of Babylon, then this city shall be given into the hand of the Chaldeans, and they shall burn it with fire, and you shall not escape from their hand.” (38:17-18)

  1. Finding–Surrender is the best option if the people will not turn and repent.
  2. Criteria–The Lord’s word is the only option–repent, turn back, obey the Lord.
  3. Condition–The word of the Lord through Jeremiah to Zedekiah reveals the best counsel.
  4. Cause–False counsel will result in defeat and doom.
  5. Effect–The people and the king can live in Babylonian exile.
  6. Recommendation–Surrender.

Jeremiah 39, The Fall of Jerusalem
I. “In the ninth year of Zedekiah king of Judah, in the the tenth month, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon and all his army came against Jerusalem and besieged it. In the eleventh year of Zedekiah, in the fourth month, on the ninth day of the month, a breach was made in the city. The king of Babylon slaughtered the sons of Zedekiah at Riblah before his eyes, and the king of Babylon slaughtered all the nobles of Judah. He put out the eyes of Zedekiah and bound him in chains to take him to Babylon. The Chaldeans burned the king’s house and the house of the people, and broke down the walls of Jerusalem. Then Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, carried into exile to Babylon the rest of the people who were left in the city, those who had deserted to him, and the people who remained. ” (39:1-2, 6-9)

A. Inference: “Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, left in the land of Judah some of the poor people who owned nothing, and gave them vineyards and fields at the same time.” (39:10)

  1. Finding–The Chaldeans breached the city wall.
  2. Criteria–Although blinded, Zedekiah was kept alive (as promised by the word of the Lord) and led away to Babylon.
  3. Condition–Zedekiah’s sons and all the nobles were put to death, the poor were allowed to stay in the vineyards and fields.
  4. Cause–The people did not follow the word of the Lord as delivered by Jeremiah (the weeping prophet)
  5. Effect–Jerusalem falls.
  6. Recommendation–Weep along with Jeremiah; change, turn back to the Lord.

II. The Lord delivers Jeremiah. “Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon gave command concerning Jeremiah through Nebuzaradan, the captain of the guard, saying, ‘Take him, look after him well, and do him no harm, but deal with him as he tells you.'” (39:11)

A. Inference: “Go, and say to Ebed-melech the Ethiopian, ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I will fulfill my words against this city for harm and not for good, and they shall be accomplished before you on that day. ” (39:12-)

  1. Finding–Jeremiah is given care by the captain of the guard as promised by the word of the Lord.
  2. Criteria–The word of the Lord stated that he will fulfill his words against the city for harm and not for good; and he did.
  3. Condition–The city is seized and destroyed.
  4. Cause–Failure to obey the Lord.
  5. Effect–Doom and gloom.
  6. Recommendation–Return to the Lord God and plead for his mercy.

Jeremiah 40, Jeremiah Remains in Judah
I. “The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord after Nebuzaradan the captain of the guard had let him go from Ramah, when he took him bound in chains along with all captives of Jerusalem and Judah who were being exiled to Babylon. The captain of the guard took Jeremiah and said to him, ‘The Lord your God pronounced this disaster against this place. The Lord has brought it about, and has done as he said. Because you sinned against the Lord and did not obey his voice, this thing has come upon you. Now, behold, I release you today from the chains on your hands. If it seems good to you to come with me to Babylon, come, and I will look after you well, but if it seems wrong to you to come with me to Babylon, do not come. See, the whole land is before you; go wherever you think it good and right to go. If you remain, then return to Gedaliah the son Ahikam, son of Shaphan, whom the king of Babylon appointed governor of the cities of Judah, and dwell with him among the people. Or go whoever you think it right to go.‘” (40:1-5)

A. Inference: “Then Jeremiah went to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, at Mizpah, and lived with him among the people who were left in the land.” (40:6)

  1. Finding–The Lord pronounced disaster against this place and the Lord has brought it about as he said.
  2. Criteria–The Lord fulfilled his promise to bring disaster on his people for sinning against the Lord
  3. Condition–Exile to Babylon
  4. Cause–Because you sinned against the Lord and did not obey his voice, this thing has come upon you.
  5. Effect–Exile to Babylon except for the poor.
  6. Recommendation–Serve Babylon and dwell in the land.

Jeremiah 41, Gedaliah Murdered
I. “In the seventh month, Ishmael the son of Nethaniah, son of Elishama, of the royal family, one of the chief officers of the king, came with ten men to Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, at Mizpah. As they ate bread together there at Mizpah, Ishmael the son of Nethaniah and the ten men with him rose up and struck down Gedaliah the son of Ahikam, son of Shaphan, with the sword, and killed him, whom the king of Babylon had appointed governor in the land. Ishmael also struck down all the Judeans who were with Gedaliah at Mizpah, and the Chaldean soldiers who happened to be there.” (41:1-3)

A. Inference: “The slaughtered were cast into a cistern.” (41:7)

  1. Finding–Ishmael killed Gedaliah and all the Judeans who were with Gedaliah at Mizpah.
  2. Criteria–The king of Babylon appointed Gedaliah governor over the cities and land of Judah.
  3. Condition–Gedaliah was murdered by Ishmael.
  4. Cause–The evil of Ishmael
  5. Effect–Survivors attempted to go to Egypt to escape the Chaldeans and Ishmael
  6. Recommendation–Consult Jeremiah.

Week #101; Wed, Dec 04: Jeremiah 42-48

Week #101; Wed, Dec 04: Jeremiah 42:1–48:47

PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS:

I. A personal Biblical yardstick helps study the Bible.

A. This is mine:

  1. The Lamb’s Book of Life was compiled with our names before the foundation of the world.
  2. Isaiah 14 addresses the war in heaven and Satans fall along with his not so angelic followers.
  3. Lucifer’s pride escaped his internal controls and he and his followers exercised their free-will to contend with God over ruling God’s kingdom, a big mistake although God knew the outcome before hand.
  4. The split resulted in a ratio of 2/3 of the angels opting for God’s side and 1/3 of the angels opting for Lucifer’s side.
  5. When humans were created, God gave them free-will just like the angels.
  6. Our free-will to exercise our choice to follow God or not has similar consequences as the angels.
  7. We will soon read how Jesus died for all; however, God will only accept believers back into His kingdom.
  8. God already knows who will become a believer and He sealed their names in the Lamb’s Book of Life before the foundation of the world; blasphemy results in a name being deleted from the Lamb’s Book of Life.
  9. God does condemn some and does not want them back in His kingdom.
  10. God wants a restored pure kingdom where He will know that believers want to be on His side and not Satan’s side.
  11. So, our earthly environment is a temporary testing or proving ground.
  12. Yet, God knows the eternal outcome of our free-will choices that we make now here on earth.
  13. He is testing us now with His free-grace to make a free-will choice to believe in Jesus.
  14. God sent Jesus to die for all, but we have to believe in Him and more than that, we must develop our relationship with Him from that point on.
  15. Interlocking fingers depicts how tight our relationship with Jesus should be.

B. Inference: Read on, Scripture gets richer and richer, particularly if it is read as one voice of God.

II. Upon currently hearing the prophets, it brings us to a point where some inward reflection is good.

A. Colossians 3 isolates three important words: above, earth, and below. When directions are applied to these words, they render a vertical, horizontal, and transverse context that can be labeled God, earthly, and evil respectively.

B. When reading Scripture, the current topic can then be analyzed in an X, Y, and Z context and mentally plotted by pinpointing the following:

  1. Finding(s): Abnormality(ies)?
  2. Criteria: Basis for good results?
  3. Condition: What’s happening?
  4. Cause: How or why did the condition happen?
  5. Effect: Impact?
  6. Recommendation: Resolution for the condition/cause?

CHAPTER OBSERVATIONS:

Jeremiah 42, Warning Against Going to Egypt

I. “Then all the commanders of the forces, and Johanan the son Kereah and Jezaniah the son of Hoshaiah, and all the people from the least to the greatest, came near and said to Jeremiah the prophet, ‘Let our plea for mercy come before you, and pray to the Lord your God for us, for all this remnant (that did not go into exile)–because we are left with but a few, as your eyes see us–that the Lord your God may show us the way we should go, and the thing that we should do.'” (42:1-3)

A. Inference: “Jeremiah the prophet said to them, ‘I have heard you. Behold, I will pray to the Lord your God according to your request, and whatever the Lord answers you I will tell you. I will keep nothing back from you.'” (42:4)

  1. Finding: Jeremiah agrees to pray for the people who wanted to be shown the way they should go, and the thing that they should do.
  2. Criteria: Uncertain future; need for mercy.
  3. Condition: The people are living under captivity by the king of Babylon even though they were left behind those that were taken into exile.
  4. Cause: The people are living in fear of the king of Babylon; they did not obey God’s Word.
  5. Effect: Desperation.
  6. Recommendation: Listen to Jeremiah; adhere to God’s Word.

B. Inference: “Then they said to Jeremiah, ‘May the Lord be a true and faithful witness against us if we do not act according to all the word with which the Lord our God sends you to us. Whether it is good or bad, we will obey the voice of the Lord our God to whom we are sending you, that it may be well with us when we obey the voice of the Lord our God.” (42:5-6)

  1. Finding: Jeremiah intercedes for the people to the Lord when they promise to obey the voice of the Lord God.
  2. Criteria: Promises to obey the Lord as revealed by Jeremiah.
  3. Condition: The people are living under captivity by the king of Babylon.
  4. Cause: The people are living in fear of the king of Babylon.
  5. Effect: Desperation
  6. Recommendation: Keep promises made to Jeremiah

II. “At the end of ten days the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah. Then he summoned Johanan the son of Kareah and all the commanders of the forces who were with him, and all the people from the least to the greatest, and said to them, ‘Thus says the Lord, the God of Israel, to whom you sent me to present your plea for mercy before him: If you will remain in this land, then I will build you up and not pull you down; I will plant you, and not pluck you up; for I relent of the disaster that I did to you. Do not fear the king of Babylon, of whom you are afraid. Do not fear him, declares the Lord, for I am with you, to save you and to deliver you from his hand. I will grant you mercy, that he may have mercy on you and let you remain in your own land.” (42:7-12)

A. Inference: “But if you say, ‘We will not remain in this land,’ disobeying the voice of the Lord your God and saying, ‘No, we will go to the land of Egypt, where we shall not see war or hear the sound of the trumpet or be hungry for bread, and we will dwell there, then hear the word of the Lord, O remnant of Judah. Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: If you set your faces to enter Egypt and go to live there, then the sword that you fear shall overtake you there in the land of Egypt, and the famine of which you are afraid shall follow close after you to Egypt, and there you shall die. (42:13-15)

  1. Finding: The word of the Lord came to Jeremiah and he told the people that the Lord said not to fear the king of Babylon; the Lord will save you and deliver you from his hand, and you may remain in your own land.
  2. Criteria: “The Lord has said to you, O remnant of Judah, ‘Do not go to Egypt.'” (42:19)
  3. Condition: The people (the remnant of Judah) are living under captivity by the king of Babylon.
  4. Cause: The fall of Jerusalem, Israel, and Judah.
  5. Effect: “Now therefore know for a certainty that you shall die by the sword, by famine, and by pestilence in the place where you desire to go to live.” (42:22)
  6. Recommendation: Do not go to Egypt; stay in Judah where the Lord wants you when his untold greater plan unfolds.

Jeremiah 43, Jeremiah Taken to Egypt

I. “When Jeremiah finished speaking to all the people all these words of the Lord their God, with which the Lord their God had sent him to them, Azariah the son of Hoshaiah and Johanan the son of Kareah and all the insolent men said to Jeremiah, ‘You are telling a lie. The Lord our God did not send you to say, ‘Do not go to Egypt to live there,’ but Baruch the son of Neriah has set you against us, to deliver us into the hand of the Chaldeans, that they may kill us or take us into exile in Babylon.'” (43:1-3)

A. Inference: “So Johanan the son of Kareah and all the commanders of the forces and all the people did not obey the voice of the Lord, to remain in the land of Judah. But Johanan the son Kareah and all the commanders of the forces took all the remnant of Judah who had returned to live in the land of Judah from all the nations to which they had been driven” (43:4-5)

  1. Finding: Judah’s remnant that did not go to Babylon accused Jeremiah of lying about the voice of God about remaining in the land of Judah and not go to Egypt.
  2. Criteria: God commanded (through Jeremiah) the remnant of Judah not go to Egypt.
  3. Condition: The people (the remnant of Judah) are living under captivity by the king of Babylon.
  4. Cause: The fall of Jerusalem and Judah to Babylon.
  5. Effect: Desperation and fear.
  6. Recommendation: Listen to Jeremiah; the remnant should stay in Judah.

B. Inference: “But Johanan the son of Kareah and all the commanders of the forces took all the remnant of Judah who had returned to live in the land of Judah from all the nations to which they had been driven . . . also Jeremiah the prophet and Baruch the son of Neriah. And they came into the land of Egypt, for they did not obey the voice of the Lord.” (43:6-7)

  1. Finding: The remnant of Judah, Jeremiah and Baruch were taken to Egypt by Johanan and all the commanders of the forces against the voice of the Lord.
  2. Criteria: The voice of the Lord commanded the remnant of Judah to stay in their land and not go to Egypt.
  3. Condition: The remnant left for Egypt against the voice of the Lord.
  4. Cause: The remnant of Judah were afraid of the Chaldeans.
  5. Effect: The remnant of Judah disobeyed the voice of the Lord, setting up harsh judgment by the Lord.
  6. Recommendation: Resist going against the voice of the Lord.

C. Inference: “Then the word of the Lord came to Jeremiah in Tahpanhes: ‘Take in your hands large stones and hide them in the mortar in the pavement that is at the entrance to Pharaoh’s palace in Tahpanhes, in the sight of the men of Judah, and say to them, ‘Thus says the Lord of hosts, the God of Israel: Behold, I will send and take Nebuchadnezzar the king of Babylon, my servant, and I will set his throne above these stones that I have hidden, and he will spread his royal canopy over them. He shall come and strike the land of Egypt, giving over to the pestilence those who are doomed to the pestilence, to captivity those who are doomed to captivity, and to the sword, those who are doomed to the sword.” (43:8-11)

  1. Finding: Nebuchadnezzar will come and strike the land of Egypt
  2. Criteria: The